ICEINSPACE
Most Read Articles
Moon Phase
CURRENT MOON Waxing Crescent
26.4%
The Sun Now
Time Zones
Sydney
11:53 pm
Perth
9:53 pm
Auckland
1:53 am
New York*
9:53 am
Paris*
3:53 pm
GMT
1:53 pm




Go Back   IceInSpace > General Astronomy > General Chat

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average.
  #1  
Old 09-11-2008, 05:15 PM
boundless
Registered User

boundless is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5
Is this Aldi Telescope any good?

Aldi have got a 76/700 Optus Reflector Telescope on sale shortly for $79.

Reflecting mirror diameter 76mm
Focal Length 700mm
31.7mm diameter eyepiece – 20mm, 12.5mm,6mm
erecting eyepiece 1.5x
magnification 35x-116x
finderscope 5x 24mm

Has anyone got one of these and is it any good?

Cheers
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-11-2008, 05:24 PM
erick's Avatar
erick (Eric)
Starcatcher

erick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Haifa, Israel
Posts: 8,331
It was discussed here and got the thumbs down:-

http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/s...ad.php?t=37526
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 09-11-2008, 07:49 PM
mick pinner's Avatar
mick pinner
Astrolounge

mick pinner is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: monbulk-vic
Posts: 2,010
no.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-11-2008, 07:53 PM
TrevorW's Avatar
TrevorW
Zugzwang

TrevorW is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 6,977
Honestly save you money and don't buy a cheap plastic telescope from discount stores you'll be disappointed. Get a good pair on binoculars about $100 to start with they'll have better quality lens and EP's

Cheers
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 09-11-2008, 08:40 PM
GrahamL's Avatar
GrahamL
pro lumen

GrahamL is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Wollongbar
Posts: 2,668
I've seen these on sale after x-mass for $40.. and you know .. I'd still say
no ... though I' did consider throwing the scope and keeping the tripod

welcome and spend some time looking around here its a great resource.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 09-11-2008, 10:07 PM
seeker372011's Avatar
seeker372011 (Narayan)
6EQUJ5

seeker372011 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Sydney
Posts: 3,492
a friend of mine bought one of these... before he asked me I hasten to add...so i went along to his house to help him use it, for the first time ever maybe 9 months after he bought it

I was able to show him a tiny Saturn which gave him a bit of a buzz and a couple of the brighter deep Space objects-Jewel Box and Eta Carina and so on

he was mightily dissapointed with the image scale-he thought he should be seeing Saturn the size of a 50 cent coin ! Guess what, for 79$ you are not going to get that!

the mount is really painful to use -its typical department store rubbish

I'd save my money and buy a pair of binoculars and learn the sky.
As far as I know after that one night when i showed him how to use it, my friend has never used his scope again. that's what happens to all these discount store scopes-wind up in garage sales, having never been used
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 09-11-2008, 10:46 PM
AlexN's Avatar
AlexN
Tunnel Vision

AlexN is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Brisbane, Australia
Posts: 6,359
I think these scopes might also be a reason more people dont get into astronomy, they look through a little department store cheapie, are disgusted by the difference between the hubble images on the box, and the views through the eye piece, put the scope in the darkest corner of the garage and never voyage into astronomy again...
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-11-2008, 07:43 AM
OneOfOne's Avatar
OneOfOne (Trevor)
Meteor & fossil collector

OneOfOne is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Bentleigh
Posts: 1,386
I think if someone gave you one as a present...you still paid too much.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-11-2008, 05:52 PM
Jen's Avatar
Jen
Moving to Pandora

Jen is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Swan Hill
Posts: 6,543
Boundless to IIS
stay away from aldi scopes they are only good to put in a kids xmas stocking that you dont like very much even then $79 is a bit rich lol get some binos instead
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-11-2008, 06:33 PM
Omaroo's Avatar
Omaroo (Chris Malikoff)
Let there be night...

Omaroo is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Sydney/Cooma
Posts: 7,627
Don't listen to any of them! They're jealous! I have one and love it - only I paid $39 for the same scope as the Aldi one, only sold through the Warehouse instead.

Through the supplied eyepieces, planets are visible, as is the moon. The alt-azimuth mount is pretty shakey, and is almost acceptable with the 20-odd degree shake it sports. If you slew it around to somewhere near the object you're after, let it go and go and make a coffee. By the time you've made AND drunk your coffee the scope should have settled down so that you can start viewing - as long as you're still somewhere near your chosen object. Damping could be better... and prey there's no wind.

Deep space objects? What are those? The finder scope is pretty-well...uhm... non fuctional

All in all - if you have a spare $39 to blow, then go ahead and grab one! They're fun if nothing else. If $39 is going to kill the bank, then maybe better to save for a proper telescope like a 6" Dob.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-11-2008, 06:48 PM
qld
Registered User

qld is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: sydney australia
Posts: 162
aldi scope

Quote:
Originally Posted by boundless View Post
Aldi have got a 76/700 Optus Reflector Telescope on sale shortly for $79.

Reflecting mirror diameter 76mm
Focal Length 700mm
31.7mm diameter eyepiece 20mm, 12.5mm,6mm
erecting eyepiece 1.5x
magnification 35x-116x
finderscope 5x 24mm

Has anyone got one of these and is it any good?

Cheers
you should buy it and then go to Andrews or York and use it as a tradein
they looove to deal with first timers....this will give you the edge
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-11-2008, 07:15 PM
Bassnut's Avatar
Bassnut (Fred)
Narrowfield rules!

Bassnut is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 4,152
Umm, Chris, that would be $79, not $39, so, funny, but not "fun" to buy . Anyway, no diff. This crap will only put you off, possibly for ever.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-11-2008, 07:59 PM
Miaplacidus's Avatar
Miaplacidus (Brian)
He used to cut the grass.

Miaplacidus is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Hobart
Posts: 1,221
Hi,

There are some unique individuals out there who will attest that they got such a buzz out of making their first telescope out of two lenses, a ruler, and some plastacine that this was the only reason they persevered with the hobby. Some of them will claim that had they not "built it themselves," of if they had bought a stably-mounted half-decent telescope right at the start, or if they hadn't suffered numerous frustrations to begin with, then they would never have persisted, nor would they have developed such a life-long passion.

This is self-deception, pure and simple. They underestimate their own innate and peculiarly resiliant enthusiasm. Most people don't have this. I know I don't. (My first telescope the equivalent of an Aldi special deflated my enthusiasm so badly I lost all interest in the hobby for more years than I care to admit to. Sigh...) But who knows? Maybe you're different.

But if you're not, then you should be aware that the pathway of least frustration and maximum ease is to buy a dobsonian. (That is, after the binoculars).

Think about it. The heaviest part of a refracting telescope might be 8 feet off the ground. The heaviest part of a dobsonian telescope might be as low 8 inches off the ground. Which do you think is going to be the most stable and least wobbly?
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-11-2008, 08:01 PM
leon's Avatar
leon
Registered User

leon is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: ballarat
Posts: 9,097
You have been given good advice here, so all I can say is NO.

Leon
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-11-2008, 10:48 PM
Screwdriverone's Avatar
Screwdriverone (Chris)
I have detailed files....

Screwdriverone is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kellyville Ridge, NSW Australia
Posts: 3,233
Hi Boundless,

Nope, avoid it like the plague.

The BARE minimum would be something like this, which will cost you $199 from one of the cheapest suppliers around (in Sydney) or $249 from Star Optics for the same thing.
Skywatcher 70 x 500 AZ3 (it has slow motion controls too)
This can be used for land viewing also, in case you get bored with the night sky.

http://www.andrewscom.com.au/site-co...skywatcher.htm

If your budget can stretch to $399, you should entertain the idea of an 8 inch GSO Dobsonian, which you can buy from Andrews and will give you MASSIVELY better views than the scope above and is a doddle to use.
Guan Sheng GS-680 8"
200mm x 1200mm
Limited version
$399.00 AUD

As mentioned before, buy a pair of 11x70 or 15x70 binoculars from aforementioned suppliers in the range of $129-$160 and your money will be MUCH better spent on something you can use for the rest of your life.

If you have a lazy $400-$500 and are genuinely interested in telescopes, start around 8 inches (200mm) or you will be disappointed with the views, seriously... the difference between 4-5 inch scope and an 8 inch is not that much in price, but the views are substantially better. I know, I bought a 5 inch scope and have wanted a bigger one since I bought it.

Mine is quite good, but for the same price, I could have bought an 8 inch dobsonian which would have been a better buy.

Here endeth the lesson.

Chris

P.S. Best value for money is FREE, head to your local Astronomy society's viewing night and have a look at the different scopes the club has or the members have as they will ALL show you their scopes, generally, its a great way to meet people, see amazing things and costs you very little to browse and decide which way you want to go. Check out the "Our Community" and Link pages on the IIS menu on the left for some Astronomy societies and clubs as well as suppliers websites. or just google for your area.

Cheers again

Chris
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 11-11-2008, 05:26 PM
Mrs Nagy (Mandy)
12" Bintel Dob F/5

Mrs Nagy is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Pascoe Vale, Vic, Australia
Posts: 7
Chris

P.S. Best value for money is FREE, head to your local Astronomy society's viewing night and have a look at the different scopes the club has or the members have as they will ALL show you their scopes, generally, its a great way to meet people, see amazing things and costs you very little to browse and decide which way you want to go. Check out the "Our Community" and Link pages on the IIS menu on the left for some Astronomy societies and clubs as well as suppliers websites. or just google for your area.

Cheers again

Chris[/quote]
I agree with Chris, you should go to one of the viewing nights that many of the astronomical clubs hold every year and have a look through different scopes which will help you decide what is good and what you don't like. I did this years ago and although I have just managed to get my own Dobsonian it is what I knew I wanted once I looked through a variety of different scopes on a viewing night. Good Luck
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-11-2008, 08:28 PM
Screwdriverone's Avatar
Screwdriverone (Chris)
I have detailed files....

Screwdriverone is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Kellyville Ridge, NSW Australia
Posts: 3,233
Nice one Mandy!!!

to Ice In Space!

I see you did your homework and purchased a nice "little" scope

12 inch Dobsonian, way to start small!!!

Welcome aboard, and thanks for the contribution.

Cheers

Chris

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs Nagy View Post
Chris

P.S. Best value for money is FREE, head to your local Astronomy society's viewing night and have a look at the different scopes the club has or the members have as they will ALL show you their scopes, generally, its a great way to meet people, see amazing things and costs you very little to browse and decide which way you want to go. Check out the "Our Community" and Link pages on the IIS menu on the left for some Astronomy societies and clubs as well as suppliers websites. or just google for your area.

Cheers again

Chris
I agree with Chris, you should go to one of the viewing nights that many of the astronomical clubs hold every year and have a look through different scopes which will help you decide what is good and what you don't like. I did this years ago and although I have just managed to get my own Dobsonian it is what I knew I wanted once I looked through a variety of different scopes on a viewing night. Good Luck[/quote]
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 12-07-2011, 11:19 AM
andrei23's Avatar
andrei23 (Andrei)
Registered User

andrei23 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Los Angeles, USA
Posts: 2
Question 6" Reflector vs. 90mm Cassegrain?

Hi there,

I unfortunately bought one of those cheapie 76/700mm Optus telescopes at a flea market for $20. Moon looked great, but most nights it was either moon or "dots", so after a couple of sky-gazing attempts I eventually lost interest.

I'm looking to upgrade my set-up with one of those GPS/GoTo/camera "idiot"-proof kits which seem to make astronomy so much more fun for the rest of us, and I think I've got it narrowed down to two scopes in terms of bang for the buck (both are about $650 for the entire kit):

One is a 6" reflector with 1400mm focal length and 140X magnification, 280X with the Barlow adaptor (eBay item # 140545877289). The other is a 90mm Cassegrain with a 1200mm focal length and 155X magnification (eBay item # 130518260467). Obviously the 6" collects more light, but I've been told that due to the Cassegrain's superior optics and shorter focal length that in a rural, low-light setting I may actually get clearer images. Intuition tells me to still go with the 6", as the wider aperture should make much more difference then 200mm of focal length, no?

Or am I better off saving my pennies a bit longer and getting an 8" because neither of these will really be much of an improvement over my 76/700? Only thing with the 8" models is they don't seem to have the auto-everything GPS & camera kits, not for under $2000 anyway. Is it really 4X "more scope", or can I find some amateur amusement also with a 6"?

Really appreciate the input of more experienced members - thanks in advance!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12-07-2011, 11:49 AM
jenchris (Jennifer)
Registered User

jenchris is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ormeau Gold Coast
Posts: 1,231
But what about that 650x magnification and all those meteors colliding in fiery explosions I'm going to miss?
That unique cut off point at 100,000,000 miles that 'll never see past.... I'm a broken woman - I'm going to end it all - hand me my trusty steak knife with the loose handle.... and my 'that's not all', picture of Tasmania and a block of flats....
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-07-2011, 12:17 PM
renormalised's Avatar
renormalised (Carl)
No More Infinities

renormalised is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Townsville
Posts: 9,676
Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by andrei23 View Post
Hi there,

I unfortunately bought one of those cheapie 76/700mm Optus telescopes at a flea market for $20. Moon looked great, but most nights it was either moon or "dots", so after a couple of sky-gazing attempts I eventually lost interest.

I'm looking to upgrade my set-up with one of those GPS/GoTo/camera "idiot"-proof kits which seem to make astronomy so much more fun for the rest of us, and I think I've got it narrowed down to two scopes in terms of bang for the buck (both are about $650 for the entire kit):

One is a 6" reflector with 1400mm focal length and 140X magnification, 280X with the Barlow adaptor (eBay item # 140545877289). The other is a 90mm Cassegrain with a 1200mm focal length and 155X magnification (eBay item # 130518260467). Obviously the 6" collects more light, but I've been told that due to the Cassegrain's superior optics and shorter focal length that in a rural, low-light setting I may actually get clearer images. Intuition tells me to still go with the 6", as the wider aperture should make much more difference then 200mm of focal length, no?

Or am I better off saving my pennies a bit longer and getting an 8" because neither of these will really be much of an improvement over my 76/700? Only thing with the 8" models is they don't seem to have the auto-everything GPS & camera kits, not for under $2000 anyway. Is it really 4X "more scope", or can I find some amateur amusement also with a 6"?

Really appreciate the input of more experienced members - thanks in advance!
Andrei, welcome to IIS

You will be far better off if you look to buy an 8-10" dob than any of the scopes you have mentioned. The reason being apart from the cost, you will find them much easier to use and you will end up using it more often. A typical scope like an 8" Meade LX90/200 will set you back at least $2000 and that's just for the basics. Get into taking piccies with it and the cost will rise accordingly. The 8" LT series is about the cheapest of the GOTO's of that size. As far as the dobs go, have a look here at these...

Orion SkyQuest Scopes

SkyWatcher Scopes

If you save up a bit more, you can get a larger scope (10" or more), plus computer control as well.

One other piece of advise....join an astronomy club. There you'll get to look through scopes you maybe interested in, you'll make some great friends and learn a lot about scopes and the stars.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 11:53 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
FLI Cameras and Imaging Accessories
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
AS&T Aug Sep 2014
Advertisement
iOptron SkyTracker
Advertisement
Astronomy Alive
Advertisement
ZWO Cameras at Optics Central
Advertisement
iOptron SkyTracker
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement
Advertisement
10x IceInSpace Stickers