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Moon Phase
CURRENT MOON First Quarter
47.6%
The Sun Now
Time Zones
Sydney
8:29 am
Perth
6:29 am
Auckland
10:29 am
New York*
6:29 pm
Paris*
12:29 am
GMT
10:29 pm




Moon Phase



CURRENT MOON




Monday, 21 May 2018
22:29 GMT

Phase name: First Quarter
Illumination: 47.6%
Age: 7.2 Days
   
Full moon: Tuesday, 29 May (14:20)
Last quarter: Wednesday, 6 June (18:34)
New Moon: Wednesday, 13 June (19:45)
First quarter: Wednesday, 20 June (10:52)
Full moon: Thursday, 28 June (04:54)



Lunar and Solar Activitiy For The Coming Week
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otherwise please consider signing up to the IceInSpace forums.
Moon Phase Rise & Set Times Twilight Times
Date
(midnight)
Phase name
Illumination
Moon
Rise Set
Sun
Rise Set
Civil
Begin End
Nautical
Begin End
Astronomical
Begin End
Sunday
20 May 18
Waxing Crescent
26.2%
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Monday
21 May 18
Waxing Crescent
37%
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Tuesday
22 May 18
First Quarter
48.3%
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Wednesday
23 May 18
Waxing Gibbous
59.4%
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Thursday
24 May 18
Waxing Gibbous
69.9%
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Friday
25 May 18
Waxing Gibbous
79.3%
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Saturday
26 May 18
Waxing Gibbous
87.1%
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Sunday
27 May 18
Waxing Gibbous
93.2%
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All times are displayed in GMT

Twilight is before sunrise and again after sunset. There are intervals of time, twilight, during which there is natural light provided by the upper atmosphere, which does receive direct sunlight and reflects part of it toward the Earth's surface. Some outdoor activities may be conducted without artificial illumination during these intervals, and it is useful to have some means to set limits beyond which a certain activity should be assisted by artificial lighting. The major determinants of the amount of natural light during twilight are the state of the atmosphere generally and local weather conditions in particular. Atmospheric conditions are best determined at the actual time and place of events. Nevertheless, it is possible to establish useful, though necessarily approximate, limits applicable to large classes of activities by considering only the position of the Sun below the local horizon. Reasonable and convenient definitions have evolved.

Civil twilight is defined to begin in the morning, and to end in the evening when the center of the Sun is geometrically 6 degrees below the horizon. This is the limit at which twilight illumination is sufficient, under good weather conditions, for terrestrial objects to be clearly distinguished; at the beginning of morning civil twilight, or end of evening civil twilight, the horizon is clearly defined and the brightest stars are visible under good atmospheric conditions in the absence of moonlight or other illumination. In the morning before the beginning of civil twilight and in the evening after the end of civil twilight, artificial illumination is normally required to carry on ordinary outdoor activities. Complete darkness, however, ends sometime prior to the beginning of morning civil twilight and begins sometime after the end of evening civil twilight.

Nautical twilight is defined to begin in the morning, and to end in the evening, when the center of the sun is geometrically 12 degrees below the horizon. At the beginning or end of nautical twilight, under good atmospheric conditions and in the absence of other illumination, general outlines of ground objects may be distinguishable, but detailed outdoor operations are not possible, and the horizon is indistinct.

Astronomical twilight is defined to begin in the morning, and to end in the evening when the center of the Sun is geometrically 18 degrees below the horizon. Before the beginning of astronomical twilight in the morning and after the end of astronomical twilight in the evening the Sun does not contribute to sky illumination; for a considerable interval after the beginning of morning twilight and before the end of evening twilight, sky illumination is so faint that it is practically imperceptible.

Twilight definitions courtesy U.S. Naval Observatory.

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