Go Back   IceInSpace > Beginners Start Here > Beginners Equipment Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 15-01-2016, 04:41 PM
protik
Registered User

protik is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 6
Binocular recommendation for general usage and star gazing

Hi guys

Would like to purchase my first bin that can be used for wildlife viewing (Africa trip soon), backpacking, hiking etc. If it's capable of limited star gazing that would be a bonus (to go with a 8" dob). Based on research I am considering a 8x30 or a 8x42:

Nikon Monarch 7 8x42
Nikon Monarch 7 8x30

Comparison here.

If you guys have any feedback which one to opt for (8x30 vs 8x42) or have any other better quality bin recommendation around/under $750 that would be much appreciated.

Cheers
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 15-01-2016, 05:29 PM
BeanerSA (Paul)
Registered User

BeanerSA is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Gateway to the Barossa
Posts: 314
If it were me, the 8x42 Monarchs would be my pick.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 15-01-2016, 06:00 PM
Camelopardalis's Avatar
Camelopardalis (Dunk)
Drifting from the pole

Camelopardalis is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 4,801
Look out for a pair of Canon image stabilised bins as they're excellent all-round and behave like larger bins.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 17-01-2016, 07:25 AM
SeaLance (Jeff)
Registered User

SeaLance is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 1
Nikon Monarch 7 8x42. They are affordable, portable, high quality. I work at sea and they outperform many of the more expensive and heavier binoculars we use on the vessel, not to mention they are comfortable to hold and carry.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 31-01-2016, 02:39 PM
chris lewis
Registered User

chris lewis is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: auckland
Posts: 191
Yes the 8x42s are recommended. The alternative is a good 10x50. 10x50's are the hand held 'standard' when it comes to astronomy. A good 10x50 will give you that extra brightness and depth. Nikon do an excellent 10x50, their AE version.

Chris
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 31-01-2016, 02:53 PM
Atmos's Avatar
Atmos (Colin)
Ultimate Noob

Atmos is online now
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 6,639
I've put in an order for a pair of 10x50 Pentax SP. $139 at Bintel and from what I have read up on them, excellent for the price.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 31-01-2016, 04:39 PM
Tropo-Bob (Bob)
Registered User

Tropo-Bob is online now
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Cairns
Posts: 932
I have several pairs of binoculars and if I was hiking, I would take my light-weight Kowa YF 8x30s. They give a quality image (with a 7.5 degree field) and I mainly use them for casual Star-gazing. Recently, I used them to observe a comet.
Currently they can be brought for $199.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-02-2016, 05:31 PM
ausastronomer (John Bambury)
Registered User

ausastronomer is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Shoalhaven Heads, NSW
Posts: 2,513
I own or have regular access to 8 pairs of binoculars ranging from 5 x 20 "$20 Tasco toys" to a pair of 25 x 150 Fujinon FMT SX (over $10k) and a 12"/F5 binocular telescope.

If I could only have one pair that had to be an "allrounder" it would be a pair of 10 x 42's.

I have a pair of 10 x 42 Leupolds (Japanese made internal focus waterproof porro prism design) and they see more use than all the other binoculars combined. I owned a pair of 8 x 40's and sold them to buy the 10 x 42 Leupolds and they are much more versatile than the 8x binos.

There are several good binoculars available in this size range and in the price range you are looking at (about $650). I rate the Nikon Monarchs as "pretty decent". They are way better than the "cheapies" but aren't the optical equal of my Japanese made Leupold 10 x 42 porro prism binos and the images are not as bright, but they do have a slightly larger TFOV. Unfortunately roof prism binos costing < $1,000 generally can't quite equal the optical performance of good porro prism binos, although the gap is narrowing all the time, as phase coating technology continues to improve. The way the optical world is heading these days because of the ergonomic advantages of roof prisms, its hard to find mid to high quality 10 x 42 porro prism binos, with "decent" roof prism binos becoming more affordable and better optically per $$$ spent.

Here is a post Dennis made on IIS about 10 years ago outlining the pluses and minuses of both designs.

http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/s...6&postcount=24

The Nikon Monarchs are certainly pretty good and probably what you're gonna get for ~$600 these days, so if you like em buy em, but just be aware they will fall a touch short optically of a good porro prism binocular in the same size class.

Cheers,
John B
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 13-02-2016, 12:24 AM
Mickoid (Michael)
Registered User

Mickoid is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 844
Hi, I'm a newly registered member that couldn't help not give some advice here.
Many years ago when purchasing a pair of binoculars for astronomy, I was told that to maximize the amount of light transmission, especially at night, choose a pair with a large exit eye relief value.
What this means is that when the pupil of a young adult is dark adapted, their pupil will be dilated to about 7mm. Now matching your binocular eyepiece exit eye relief to the diameter of your dilated pupil will give you the maximum amount of light transmission.
This is calculated by dividing the power rating of the binoculars into the diameter of the objective lens. For example, 11 x 80, 10 x 70, 7 x 50, 5 x 35, will all meet the requirement.
If you are an older adult or you want to use your binoculars primarily for daytime use, then you can afford smaller exit eye relief values. Thus, 10 x 50, 8 x 42, 6 x 30, would all be suitable and a nice compromise for day or night viewing.
Keep in mind that the higher powers and larger objectives without stabilization will be more difficult to keep steady. I think 7 x 50 binoculars are a comfortable and good all rounder but it also comes down to portability and convenience as well, some binoculars are quite large and heavy to carry around.
Good luck with your choice.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-03-2016, 06:55 AM
AEAJR (Ed)
Registered User

AEAJR is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 372
Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by protik View Post
Hi guys

Would like to purchase my first bin that can be used for wildlife viewing (Africa trip soon), backpacking, hiking etc. If it's capable of limited star gazing that would be a bonus (to go with a 8" dob). Based on research I am considering a 8x30 or a 8x42:

Nikon Monarch 7 8x42
Nikon Monarch 7 8x30

Comparison here.

If you guys have any feedback which one to opt for (8x30 vs 8x42) or have any other better quality bin recommendation around/under $750 that would be much appreciated.

Cheers
I am interested to hear what you purchased and how it is working out for you.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 19-03-2016, 10:56 PM
jeelan (Jeelan)
Registered User

jeelan is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Perth
Posts: 65
I'm going to go against the thread here and recommend 8 x 32's instead.

I have a few different types of binos and find 8x32's the most comfortable for prolonged periods of hanging around my neck.

You said you're going to Africa so will be using for wildlife viewing. If you're going to East Africa, once you're in the game parks and your guide opens the roof of your vehicle, chances are you'll be on your feet with binos hanging off your neck.

First trip i did, over a few days, i found 42's too heavy. ON subsequent trips I've always taken 8x32's and now that's all I prefer. The reduction on objective lens is a moot point if you're game viewing in daylight. Makes a slight difference in lower light (dawn/dusk).

My recommendation would be either the Monarch 7's or if you can stretch your budget, Pentax DCF SP 8x32.

I'd also look at the Vortex diamondback range with ED glass. Vortex's warranty is probably the best I've seen in the market.

cheers
Jeelan
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
binocular, nikon

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 11:23 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Testar
Advertisement
Astromechanics
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement