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Old 29-10-2020, 12:50 PM
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madbadgalaxyman (Robert)
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Cheap trouble-free infrared imaging?

Hi All,

I came upon what appears to be a compact and easy-to-use Near--infrared camera.

Could this be the infrared sensor that amateurs have been waiting for??!?

http://trieye.tech/products

The Near-infrared wavelengths at which this camera operates are not specified, but apparently the sensitivity of this device is between 1 micron and 1.6 microns.

As some of you will be aware, there are many objects near the galactic plane that are appreciably dimmed by extinction from intervening interstellar dust, so by imaging in the Near-infrared, we can very significantly reduce the number of magnitudes of foreground extinction in front of these objects. So infrared is great, if you can get or afford a practical imaging system for these wavelengths, as it allows you to "dig out" those obscured galactic objects.

Cheers,
Robert
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Old 29-10-2020, 04:15 PM
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multiweb (Marc)
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I have used an astronomik pro planet 742nm in the past to do long exposures on my QHY9 with some success although most CCDs QE drops pretty fast in NIR. I have bought an ASI462MC which is oddly more sensitive in IR than visible light. I also have very small filters 800nm and 900nm narrow(ish) band and the sensor of the ASI is only 6mm diagonal so I'll be trying to do long exposures with that. The camera is not cooled so I'm not sure how it's going to work but I'll give it a go and see what happens.
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Old 29-10-2020, 04:57 PM
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Information on the company website is very minimal. It is apparently a CMOS- based sensor, capable of imaging longward of 1000nm.

This would be ( if this really does work) a major advance

( usual CCD technology doesn't allow imaging beyond 900nm, as far as I know)
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Old 31-10-2020, 07:26 AM
SB (Chris)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by multiweb View Post
I have used an astronomik pro planet 742nm in the past to do long exposures on my QHY9 with some success although most CCDs QE drops pretty fast in NIR. I have bought an ASI462MC which is oddly more sensitive in IR than visible light. I also have very small filters 800nm and 900nm narrow(ish) band and the sensor of the ASI is only 6mm diagonal so I'll be trying to do long exposures with that. The camera is not cooled so I'm not sure how it's going to work but I'll give it a go and see what happens.
Hi Marc,
Id be interested to hear how you go with the ASI462MC and IR.

Chris
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Old 31-10-2020, 08:10 AM
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multiweb (Marc)
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Hi Marc,
I’d be interested to hear how you go with the ASI462MC and IR.

Chris
I suspect it could work because its IR sensitivity created a few issues with my RGB planetary imaging so keen to experiment when the deluge goes away.

The only unknown to date is cumulative noise. I have no idea how this will pan out.
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Old 03-11-2020, 10:38 AM
SB (Chris)
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I suspect it could work because its IR sensitivity created a few issues with my RGB planetary imaging so keen to experiment when the deluge goes away.

The only unknown to date is cumulative noise. I have no idea how this will pan out.
Hi Marc,
I was thinking how to use filters for segmenting near IR and had a look at stacking the Astronomik IR Pass filters in order to segment the near IR wavelengths. I think this could work quite well. Any thoughts? See attached.

By stacking filters we could get:

600 to 730 nm by using the L1 filter with the Pro planet 642
730 to 840 nm
800 to 840 nm and
800+ nm

Images from the last three wavelength groups could be assigned colours in post processing.

Chris.
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Old 04-11-2020, 09:21 AM
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Absolutely. It does work. I've done that in the past. Gotta find the posts. You lose a bit of light gathering but you narrow the bandpass.
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Old 11-11-2020, 07:31 AM
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I had an opportunity to use the ASI462MC for deepsky RGB last night. Nebulosity didn't recognize the camera with the native driver but it worked as an ASCOM camera. I used the CN-212 on the trap on M42 . Could not find any guide star around the horse head. Tonight I will switch to IR and see how it performs on long exposures. I did 27x120s. There is no cumulative noise.
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Last edited by multiweb; 11-11-2020 at 09:39 AM.
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