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Old 30-06-2020, 08:43 PM
LucasB (Lucas)
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IC4628 - Prawn Nebula in Ha - First light for WO FLT110

Hi Everyone,

It's been a while since I have done any imaging but I finally got motivated after purchasing a used William Optics FLT 110 and decided to give it first light (well in my hands anyway).

I managed to get 11 x 10 minute Ha subs of the Prawn Nebula with the QHY183M. I was a little rusty on the processing but it started coming back to me as I went along. It's not a lot of data but it was nice to get back out there.

Link to the larger image on Astrobin is here

Thanks for looking,
Lucas
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Old 30-06-2020, 09:16 PM
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gregbradley
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Lovely and sharp. That scopes' a keeper.

Greg.
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Old 30-06-2020, 11:43 PM
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strongmanmike (Michael)
Woohoo it's clear

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Looks pretty good Lucas, a lovely Ha shot and nicely framed too

Must be good to get out, I had a 5 week break recently and certainly needed my fix after that length of time ... and I agree with Greg, scope looks to be pretty good.

Mike
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Old 01-07-2020, 06:29 AM
Placidus (Mike and Trish)
Narrowing the band

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Superb!
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Old 01-07-2020, 10:46 AM
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multiweb (Marc)
ze frogginator

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Really nice dynamic range. Sharp as. Top shelf.
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Old 01-07-2020, 03:48 PM
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Andy01 (Andy)
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Nice work! Gotta be happy with that result
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Old 01-07-2020, 07:37 PM
LucasB (Lucas)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregbradley View Post
Lovely and sharp. That scopes' a keeper.

Greg.
Thanks Greg. I agree the scope is a keeper - I might have to look at getting a reducer

Quote:
Originally Posted by strongmanmike View Post
Looks pretty good Lucas, a lovely Ha shot and nicely framed too

Must be good to get out, I had a 5 week break recently and certainly needed my fix after that length of time ... and I agree with Greg, scope looks to be pretty good.

Mike
Thanks Mike. It was great to get out but I had the usual cob webs after not being out for a while.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Placidus View Post
Superb!
Cheers Mike N Trish!

Quote:
Originally Posted by multiweb View Post
Really nice dynamic range. Sharp as. Top shelf.
Thanks Marc. I was a little concerned moving to 12 bit CMOS but your feedback regarding dynamic range has convinced me it is a good move.

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Originally Posted by Andy01 View Post
Nice work! Gotta be happy with that result
Thanks Andy, much appreciated. Now to add the remaining narrow band!
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Old 02-07-2020, 09:33 AM
Placidus (Mike and Trish)
Narrowing the band

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Oh what a lovely shot.


I think, if I were starting again, knowing what I know now, I'd get a much smaller scope, say a 4 to 6 inch refractor. The twenty inch is good for extremely faint detail, for example the outer chevrons of the helix, or details in very faint tidal tails like in the clubs on the antennae, or getting shape in squillions of background galaxies, but for the Caldwell One Hundred, for everyone's favourites, your approach is far, far superior, and involves the loss of much less hair.



Only now, at the end, do I understand the True Power of the Small Scope.


Best,
Mike
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Old 02-07-2020, 08:26 PM
LucasB (Lucas)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Placidus View Post
Oh what a lovely shot.

I think, if I were starting again, knowing what I know now, I'd get a much smaller scope, say a 4 to 6 inch refractor. The twenty inch is good for extremely faint detail, for example the outer chevrons of the helix, or details in very faint tidal tails like in the clubs on the antennae, or getting shape in squillions of background galaxies, but for the Caldwell One Hundred, for everyone's favourites, your approach is far, far superior, and involves the loss of much less hair.

Only now, at the end, do I understand the True Power of the Small Scope.

Best,
Mike
Thanks for the feedback Mike, I really appreciate it.
I'm glad that you enjoyed viewing the image and that is of a level that could make you feel this way. I do enjoy the rarities your large scope brings to the table that smaller scopes can't.
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