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Old 15-12-2012, 11:00 PM
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Deep Sky Companions- "Southern Gems" by Stephen O'Meara.

16 days to go before this much awaited book is due for its release date on the 31/12/12.
I'm a huge fan of O'Meara's books so I can't wait to get my hands on this one.

Book Depository have it on a pre-order sale at the moment for $39.02.

Quote:
In Southern Gems, Stephen James O'Meara makes a detour beneath the southern skies, presenting a fresh list of 120 deep-sky objects for southern hemisphere stargazers to observe. Showcasing many exceptional objects catalogued by the pioneering observer James Dunlop, known as the 'Messier of the southern skies', all are visible through small- to moderate-sized telescopes or binoculars under dark skies. The list features some of the blackest dark nebulae, icy blue planetary nebulae and magnificent galaxies of all types. Each object is accompanied by beautiful photographs and sketches, original finder charts, visual histories and up-to-date astrophysical background information. Whether you live in the southern hemisphere or are just visiting, this new Deep-Sky Companion will make a perfect observing partner, whatever your background. There is no other southern sky guide like it on the market.
The Book Depository price includes free shipping.
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Old 16-12-2012, 06:05 AM
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Me too! Order has been in at The Book Depository most of the year. Really looking forwards to it. I adore this series of observing books.
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Old 16-12-2012, 08:48 PM
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Thanks for the heads up Suzy. Just put in my order. BTW, the Amazon price with postage is $52, so $39 from the book depository is a good deal.
Geoff

Last edited by Geoff45; 17-12-2012 at 05:16 AM.
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Old 16-12-2012, 10:05 PM
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Just ordered mine, thanks Suzy
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Old 17-12-2012, 03:46 AM
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Thank you for the heads-up Suzy. It looks excellent.
Peter
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Old 17-12-2012, 09:24 AM
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Thanks Suzy. I pre-ordered mine several months ago....it's been a long wait
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Old 20-12-2012, 04:31 PM
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hi,
so are all his books a useful tool for visual astronomy ? are they an easy guide to navigate? are they all for the southern hemisphere or do they all over?
I've been starting to look for some books to help me learn and find new things... any other recommendations ?
thanks,
Les

Last edited by lesbehrens; 21-12-2012 at 02:42 PM.
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Old 20-12-2012, 09:39 PM
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Not sure if anyone else was aware of this but I preordered through Amazon and got an email that publication had been put back to March '13,

Malcolm
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Old 21-12-2012, 09:23 AM
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The Book Depository is still showing 11 days till publication. Here's hoping they're right. Was it Amazon USA Malcolm? They quite often lag behind with British publications.
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Old 21-12-2012, 10:14 AM
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The Book Depository (UK) is still listing the book as 10 days to go before release with free delivery

Last edited by allan gould; 21-12-2012 at 11:00 PM.
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Old 21-12-2012, 01:59 PM
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Cambridge's UK site states Feb 2013, the US site says Jan 2013.
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Old 21-12-2012, 04:56 PM
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Per ordered last night. Hope it is only 10 days as still said that.

Ps. New to the site, hi all
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  #13  
Old 21-12-2012, 05:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barx1963 View Post
Not sure if anyone else was aware of this but I preordered through Amazon and got an email that publication had been put back to March '13,

Malcolm


I'm going to email the UK BooK Depository and see what's going on, grrrr, many of us have been waiting too long for this book to come out as it is!

------------------------------------------------


Hi Grant,
A great big to IIS.
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  #14  
Old 21-12-2012, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lesbehrens View Post
hi,
so are all his books a useful tool for visual astronomy ? are they an easy guide to navigate? are they all for the southern hemisphere or do they all over?
I've been starting to look for some books to help me learn and find new things... any other recommendations ?
thanks,
Les
Hi Les,
I have The Deep Sky Companions: The Messier Objects and it covers all the Messiers. Not sure about the rest of the series.
Their great observing books, as he explains all the little details to look for in an object and how to star hop to it using a very simple guide. It's a teaching book really. And he explains things so well!

Take a look below- I've cut & pasted from previous posts and added it below.

The Messier book along with Collins "Stars & Planets" are my right hand at the scope.



The Southern Sky Guide (David Ellyard)...
I just could never get into this book.
For me, I find the maps difficult to read and having the constellations broken up makes it even harder. The descriptions on the facing page aren't well laid out either as the object descriptions are merged thru large paragraphs instead of being listed.


Hartungs Astronomical Objects for Southern Telescopes...
I did a thread on this a while back.
http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/showthread.php?t=63394&highlight=ha rtung's

This is an observers companion book describing the objects beautifully. There are no maps however. Anyone that owns one of these books, displays it with pride of place on their bookshelf I'm sure (as I do).




In summary...
I doubt that you'll find one book that will do it all. Like me, you'll probably find that you'll wind up with several books and maps. Some books cater for the brighter objects and are quite easy to read and navigate thru, others are intense, some books cater more for "observing", i.e. more a teaching guide on techniques and what to look for in objects (such as Stephen O'Meara's Deep Sky Objects- Messier Objects- fantastic book, and Hartung's), some books list the astrophhysics and objects of interest better or clearer than others, etc. I have lots of books/maps- each used for different observations.



- Stars & Planets by Ian Ridpath & Wil Tirion
One of my favorite hard working books. Covers general astronomy at the beginning of the book and the rest is dedicated to maps with the facing page to each map detailing objects of interest and the astrophysics. It will tell you what the spectral classes of the stars are, nice doubles to look at, and each object of interest nicely detailed. Beautiful pics accompany them. Each constellation has its own map- very easy to use. Great book for beginners. Even though it's more specific to telescopes, many of the objects and stars in it are viewable through binos or the naked eye. I highly recommend this book also.

I've attached some pics here for you...

Click image for larger version

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ID:	128672

Click image for larger version

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ID:	128673



The Night Sky Observers Guide.
The Night Sky Observers Guide series is a great book. It's quite intense and covers a ton of deep sky objects with finder charts for everything, sketches on lots of objects, and observation notes as to what can be see through different sized apertures.
At the beginning of each constellation it gives a large table listing of binocular objects and stars of interest. It's a hard cover book with a whopping 504 pages!

There are a lot of dso's in this book more specific to larger scopes, but there's still plenty of stuff in it for 8-10" scopes, not a lot for 4-6" scopes, and pretty much favors 12-14" and in particular 16" scopes. Many feel this book is a bit advanced at beginner level as it goes quite deep but I love this book and wouldn't be without it.. a book I will grow into as I get more experience. Many of us on here own this book/series.

Our own Paddy has done a wonderful review of it here in this forum.
http://www.iceinspace.com.au/46-627-0-0-1-0.html



Atlas of the Southern Night Sky.
Another thick and fantastic book. Beautiful colour photographs, descriptions of the objects, followed by a map on the facing page.
Paddy has done a review of this book also (good work Paddy!)
http://www.iceinspace.com.au/bookreviews.html



Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas.
Being spiral bound, it's easy to handle on your lap by the scope as it stays open. It's filled with a ton of goodies that go deeper than "Collins Stars & Planets", but for a first book, I would recommend "Stars & Planets" first because the pocket atlas book is mainly maps. The Pocket Sky Atlas even has a Telrad circle to use with it's maps.
It's so cheap at only $20 from the Book Depository in the UK (free shipping!) - great value!



Deep Sky Companions: The Messier Objects, by Stephen O'Meara.
It's an observing book and tells you all the little details to go look for, and also a little black & white pic (for every object) of what to expect to see out of your telescope. Lots of sketches too- so you can really get a nice sample of what to expect at the eyepiece. He observed with only around 4 inches of aperture, so everything he says is within reach for most of us. Some astro physics are given on each object too, and basically its about a page per object. It is a hard working companion of mine.


Click image for larger version

Name:	20-8-11 335.jpg
Views:	27
Size:	195.0 KB
ID:	128670

Click image for larger version

Name:	20-8-11 336.jpg
Views:	20
Size:	197.5 KB
ID:	128671


And a new book I'm adding to the list...

Galaxies And How To Observe Them
I love this book- it's a teaching guide on how to observe galaxies- everything you need to know is in this book!
The link I've given has a google preview for it.

"This book is a unique work satisfying the need for a modern, comprehensive review of all major aspects of galaxy observation. It is the only book to specialize on visual observation of galaxies and will appeal to beginners and experienced stargazers alike.

This book is a unique work satisfying the need for a modern, comprehensive review of all major aspects of galaxy observation. The book combines the physical background on the nature and data of galaxies, the relevant instrumentation and viewing techniques, and finally the targets and their individual appearance in telescopes of various apertures. A comprehensive sample of galaxies, including quasars, groups and clusters of galaxies is presented. This combination of theoretical knowledge and practical information guarantees successful observing sessions. Furthermore, the book is clearly structured with outstanding images and graphics."

Last edited by Suzy; 21-12-2012 at 06:39 PM.
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  #15  
Old 22-12-2012, 08:56 AM
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lesbehrens (Les)
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hi. thank you for sharing you experiences of these books with us all. i can see from how you have described them that these are some valuable tools to use. thank you for your your time to write this.
les


Quote:
Originally Posted by Suzy View Post
Hi Les,
I have The Deep Sky Companions: The Messier Objects and it covers all the Messiers. Not sure about the rest of the series.
Their great observing books, as he explains all the little details to look for in an object and how to star hop to it using a very simple guide. It's a teaching book really. And he explains things so well!

Take a look below- I've cut & pasted from previous posts and added it below.

The Messier book along with Collins "Stars & Planets" are my right hand at the scope.



The Southern Sky Guide (David Ellyard)...
I just could never get into this book.
For me, I find the maps difficult to read and having the constellations broken up makes it even harder. The descriptions on the facing page aren't well laid out either as the object descriptions are merged thru large paragraphs instead of being listed.


Hartungs Astronomical Objects for Southern Telescopes...
I did a thread on this a while back.
http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/showthread.php?t=63394&highlight=ha rtung's

This is an observers companion book describing the objects beautifully. There are no maps however. Anyone that owns one of these books, displays it with pride of place on their bookshelf I'm sure (as I do).




In summary...
I doubt that you'll find one book that will do it all. Like me, you'll probably find that you'll wind up with several books and maps. Some books cater for the brighter objects and are quite easy to read and navigate thru, others are intense, some books cater more for "observing", i.e. more a teaching guide on techniques and what to look for in objects (such as Stephen O'Meara's Deep Sky Objects- Messier Objects- fantastic book, and Hartung's), some books list the astrophhysics and objects of interest better or clearer than others, etc. I have lots of books/maps- each used for different observations.



- Stars & Planets by Ian Ridpath & Wil Tirion
One of my favorite hard working books. Covers general astronomy at the beginning of the book and the rest is dedicated to maps with the facing page to each map detailing objects of interest and the astrophysics. It will tell you what the spectral classes of the stars are, nice doubles to look at, and each object of interest nicely detailed. Beautiful pics accompany them. Each constellation has its own map- very easy to use. Great book for beginners. Even though it's more specific to telescopes, many of the objects and stars in it are viewable through binos or the naked eye. I highly recommend this book also.

I've attached some pics here for you...

Attachment 128672

Attachment 128673



The Night Sky Observers Guide.
The Night Sky Observers Guide series is a great book. It's quite intense and covers a ton of deep sky objects with finder charts for everything, sketches on lots of objects, and observation notes as to what can be see through different sized apertures.
At the beginning of each constellation it gives a large table listing of binocular objects and stars of interest. It's a hard cover book with a whopping 504 pages!

There are a lot of dso's in this book more specific to larger scopes, but there's still plenty of stuff in it for 8-10" scopes, not a lot for 4-6" scopes, and pretty much favors 12-14" and in particular 16" scopes. Many feel this book is a bit advanced at beginner level as it goes quite deep but I love this book and wouldn't be without it.. a book I will grow into as I get more experience. Many of us on here own this book/series.

Our own Paddy has done a wonderful review of it here in this forum.
http://www.iceinspace.com.au/46-627-0-0-1-0.html



Atlas of the Southern Night Sky.
Another thick and fantastic book. Beautiful colour photographs, descriptions of the objects, followed by a map on the facing page.
Paddy has done a review of this book also (good work Paddy!)
http://www.iceinspace.com.au/bookreviews.html



Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas.
Being spiral bound, it's easy to handle on your lap by the scope as it stays open. It's filled with a ton of goodies that go deeper than "Collins Stars & Planets", but for a first book, I would recommend "Stars & Planets" first because the pocket atlas book is mainly maps. The Pocket Sky Atlas even has a Telrad circle to use with it's maps.
It's so cheap at only $20 from the Book Depository in the UK (free shipping!) - great value!



Deep Sky Companions: The Messier Objects, by Stephen O'Meara.
It's an observing book and tells you all the little details to go look for, and also a little black & white pic (for every object) of what to expect to see out of your telescope. Lots of sketches too- so you can really get a nice sample of what to expect at the eyepiece. He observed with only around 4 inches of aperture, so everything he says is within reach for most of us. Some astro physics are given on each object too, and basically its about a page per object. It is a hard working companion of mine.


Attachment 128670

Attachment 128671


And a new book I'm adding to the list...

Galaxies And How To Observe Them
I love this book- it's a teaching guide on how to observe galaxies- everything you need to know is in this book!
The link I've given has a google preview for it.

"This book is a unique work satisfying the need for a modern, comprehensive review of all major aspects of galaxy observation. It is the only book to specialize on visual observation of galaxies and will appeal to beginners and experienced stargazers alike.

This book is a unique work satisfying the need for a modern, comprehensive review of all major aspects of galaxy observation. The book combines the physical background on the nature and data of galaxies, the relevant instrumentation and viewing techniques, and finally the targets and their individual appearance in telescopes of various apertures. A comprehensive sample of galaxies, including quasars, groups and clusters of galaxies is presented. This combination of theoretical knowledge and practical information guarantees successful observing sessions. Furthermore, the book is clearly structured with outstanding images and graphics."
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Old 22-12-2012, 09:18 AM
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Went and found the email. It said

We're writing about the order you placed on November 22, 2012 (Order# xxxxxxx). Unfortunately, the release date for the item(s) listed below has changed, and we need to provide you with a new delivery estimate based on the new release date:

Stephen James O'Meara "Deep-Sky Companions: Southern Gems"
Estimated arrival date: February 27, 2013 - March 19, 2013

Malcolm
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Old 25-12-2012, 08:23 AM
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Here's the email I got from the Book Depository yesterday.

Different release date to Malcolm's email.

Quote:
Thank you for your message.
I can confirm the publishers have advised us that this title should be released on 31st December 2012.
Any orders for this title will be shipped shortly after this date as soon as we receive stock from our supplier.
Kind Regards,Leah Graham,Customer Advisor
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Old 25-12-2012, 08:48 AM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
Bright the hawk's flight

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Hmmm!
Mayhaps I should start using the Book Depository!

Malcolm
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Old 25-12-2012, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barx1963 View Post
Hmmm!
Mayhaps I should start using the Book Depository!

Malcolm
Yes you should Malcolm,
I would trust the Book Depository! much more, as I have always had good service aaaaaand on time
Cheers
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Old 25-12-2012, 11:24 AM
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I have never had any drama with Amazon. Actually they did send me the wrong book once about 10 years ago, but they quickly sent out the correct one and the one they sent by mistake i enjoyed anyway!

Malcolm
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