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  #21  
Old 29-03-2020, 02:22 AM
TareqPhoto (Tareq)
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Originally Posted by Hemi View Post
Nice saying JA, but I’m not sure if I agree with it, or disagree. But a wise Greek physician also said.....FIRST do no harm

Yeah, i prefer not listening to Greek scientists or people in general.
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  #22  
Old 29-03-2020, 06:56 AM
Startrek (Martin)
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Tareq
Thanks for your kind comment about my images
Bigger Aperture is not always better
We are all limited by changing atmospheric conditions every time we go out
My 6” f6 has sometimes produced better quality lunar images over time than the 8” f5
With planetary imaging a lot of things affect your outcome like image scale, focal ratio, atmospheric conditions and so on ..... that’s why they coined the phrase “Lucky Imaging”
My 8” f5 is a big an aperture as I will ever need , it can resolve most objects down to magnitude 10 on a good night.
A bigger scope would require an observatory as the scope then becomes a wind sock
I’ve never tried to collimate an f4 newt but many IIS members have said on many occasions stick to with an f5 as f4 can be troublesome
I enjoy visual astronomy so I only observe with my 12” Goto dob , it’s on an Az Alt drive turntable base.Its not designed for imaging and I never bought it for than purpose
Hope you gather enough information to make a decision on what scope you by. Remember that you can’t go wrong with a 6” or 8” newt ,they just simply work and work well , they are best all round scopes on the planet for the price
Good luck !!
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  #23  
Old 29-03-2020, 07:49 AM
TareqPhoto (Tareq)
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Originally Posted by Startrek View Post
Tareq
Thanks for your kind comment about my images
Bigger Aperture is not always better
We are all limited by changing atmospheric conditions every time we go out
My 6” f6 has sometimes produced better quality lunar images over time than the 8” f5
With planetary imaging a lot of things affect your outcome like image scale, focal ratio, atmospheric conditions and so on ..... that’s why they coined the phrase “Lucky Imaging”
My 8” f5 is a big an aperture as I will ever need , it can resolve most objects down to magnitude 10 on a good night.
A bigger scope would require an observatory as the scope then becomes a wind sock
I’ve never tried to collimate an f4 newt but many IIS members have said on many occasions stick to with an f5 as f4 can be troublesome
I enjoy visual astronomy so I only observe with my 12” Goto dob , it’s on an Az Alt drive turntable base.Its not designed for imaging and I never bought it for than purpose
Hope you gather enough information to make a decision on what scope you by. Remember that you can’t go wrong with a 6” or 8” newt ,they just simply work and work well , they are best all round scopes on the planet for the price
Good luck !!
The problem is, all people giving statement but what i see is completely different, and it is always as this "Believe what you see not what you hear or read", so about big aperture isn't always better, no that is wrong, it is always better, why, because in poor seeing all scopes are bad even 1 meter scope, even 1 inch scope, so i am an educated and i should never judge a scope under poor seeing, that is the worst conclusion, so when i always mention big aperture people keep seeing over and over again "POOR SEEING", oh yeah, but i don't imaging under poor seeing even if i have 10 meter scope, so what else you can tell me people?!!!

6" Newt i was looking for buying to do DSO actually, not planets, i can still use it for planets if i have to, but i already have 8" Newt and 7" Mak, for planetary it is very simple for me that i only go with 12" or larger scope, while for DSO, this is an open area, i can go with 6", 4", 10", 14", 2",...etc, for DSO anything is possible as i see people using all kind of scopes for that, from refractor to reflector to hybrid also, but i have to be so precise in my choices, 6" F4 giving a nice focal length that i can use for different targets and because of price i can even buy two of them, but does a 6" F4 Newt really is a good answer compared to for example 3"-5" refr? And if i will buy a Tak scope later in future then what will be the status of this 6" F4 Newt?

My mistake is i bought or have few things and stuff that making anything else or next step as difficult as it should be, i mean i don't regret this 7" Mak and many dream about it, but for me from 1 year only i already look for a bigger scope, there is one person i don't like in my country who bought C11 and C14 and he just put that C11 into sale immediately and producing amazing results with C14 and in less than 1 year he is already looking for larger scope, and he has 14", so, i think i am no different, i know that a larger scope is the only way in my life, it is just i have to make it large enough, not going with 11" now and 14" later and 18" after 3 years, but i know that being at 12" and larger is already enough for planets, i saw enough results from 12" that is not much apart from 14", and i still hold my plan on 20" Dob so i won't get 14" or 16" next to 20", but 12" can fit somewhere there fine, not 9.25", not 11", not 10".
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  #24  
Old 29-03-2020, 07:54 AM
TareqPhoto (Tareq)
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By the way, i have one mono cooled camera now, but for DSO i am also planning to buy another mono cooled camera either same model of mine or an equivalent from another maker, so that is also affecting my choice of DSO scope, i can buy 2 cheap same exact scope for DSO, but my only option is either 2 Achromatic refractor or 2 small cheap Newtonian or if i can two very cheap ED/doublet refractor, no way i can afford two triplet or high end Newt, even one triplet more expensive than $500 isn't a good idea as long i am still getting that Tak FSQ later, the cheap triplets are those in 70-90mm range anyway and i won't using that for long time as many are upgrading to larger aperture such as 100, 120, 150,...etc, means getting a triplet now because people said so will make me regret it later in short time.

Also i don't want to buy a Newt F4 even if i can manage collimation as then people will believe that i don't listen and i don't care to them, if they have issues and i still go with it that means i shouldn't ask for help again, i got that a lot, sounds like either i follow people advice regardless i like i or not or i just try to find answers myself if i can.
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  #25  
Old 29-03-2020, 01:13 PM
Spartan1 (Philip)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TareqPhoto View Post
The problem is, all people giving statement but what i see is completely different, and it is always as this "Believe what you see not what you hear or read", so about big aperture isn't always better, no that is wrong, it is always better, why, because in poor seeing all scopes are bad even 1 meter scope, even 1 inch scope, so i am an educated and i should never judge a scope under poor seeing, that is the worst conclusion, so when i always mention big aperture people keep seeing over and over again "POOR SEEING", oh yeah, but i don't imaging under poor seeing even if i have 10 meter scope, so what else you can tell me people?!!!

6" Newt i was looking for buying to do DSO actually, not planets, i can still use it for planets if i have to, but i already have 8" Newt and 7" Mak, for planetary it is very simple for me that i only go with 12" or larger scope, while for DSO, this is an open area, i can go with 6", 4", 10", 14", 2",...etc, for DSO anything is possible as i see people using all kind of scopes for that, from refractor to reflector to hybrid also, but i have to be so precise in my choices, 6" F4 giving a nice focal length that i can use for different targets and because of price i can even buy two of them, but does a 6" F4 Newt really is a good answer compared to for example 3"-5" refr? And if i will buy a Tak scope later in future then what will be the status of this 6" F4 Newt?

My mistake is i bought or have few things and stuff that making anything else or next step as difficult as it should be, i mean i don't regret this 7" Mak and many dream about it, but for me from 1 year only i already look for a bigger scope, there is one person i don't like in my country who bought C11 and C14 and he just put that C11 into sale immediately and producing amazing results with C14 and in less than 1 year he is already looking for larger scope, and he has 14", so, i think i am no different, i know that a larger scope is the only way in my life, it is just i have to make it large enough, not going with 11" now and 14" later and 18" after 3 years, but i know that being at 12" and larger is already enough for planets, i saw enough results from 12" that is not much apart from 14", and i still hold my plan on 20" Dob so i won't get 14" or 16" next to 20", but 12" can fit somewhere there fine, not 9.25", not 11", not 10".

Tareq,

Reading this thread, I would like to offer the following for you to consider.
I doubt there is anybody in this forum who would not want to own a Takahashi but few will have bought it as their first, or even second scope. It's a good target to aim for.

Most people have bought used equipment and been very happy with it. There is a very active market in astronomical equipment. It is very simple...if you buy well, you can get your money back when you sell. The reason items do not sell is simple...they are overpriced. When you buy new, you can expect an item to lose 20% of its value immediately. If you go this route then you accept this.

You will never be 100% satisfied with your setup as preferences will change over time especially as you have more money to spend. Personally I would buy used until you buy your Takahashi. As you know, there is no correct answer to the question 'What is the best scope...or eyepiece.' It is a matter of personal preference. Wine tasting is a good analogy. Give someone four glasses of red wine and ask them to place them in order of quality. Dont get bogged down in details that may be quite irrelevant to your situation. I have 3 scopes that I bought because they were bargains. They are all recognized as good quality scopes, all my eyepieces are used and I know if I ever sell anything I will make money not lose it. Have I compromised at all...no, I am very happy with what I have but am sure these will not be the scopes I own in a few years.

Most importantly - DONT PANIC. Good luck with your acquisitions!
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  #26  
Old 29-03-2020, 02:33 PM
TareqPhoto (Tareq)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spartan1 View Post
Tareq,

Reading this thread, I would like to offer the following for you to consider.
I doubt there is anybody in this forum who would not want to own a Takahashi but few will have bought it as their first, or even second scope. It's a good target to aim for.

Most people have bought used equipment and been very happy with it. There is a very active market in astronomical equipment. It is very simple...if you buy well, you can get your money back when you sell. The reason items do not sell is simple...they are overpriced. When you buy new, you can expect an item to lose 20% of its value immediately. If you go this route then you accept this.

You will never be 100% satisfied with your setup as preferences will change over time especially as you have more money to spend. Personally I would buy used until you buy your Takahashi. As you know, there is no correct answer to the question 'What is the best scope...or eyepiece.' It is a matter of personal preference. Wine tasting is a good analogy. Give someone four glasses of red wine and ask them to place them in order of quality. Dont get bogged down in details that may be quite irrelevant to your situation. I have 3 scopes that I bought because they were bargains. They are all recognized as good quality scopes, all my eyepieces are used and I know if I ever sell anything I will make money not lose it. Have I compromised at all...no, I am very happy with what I have but am sure these will not be the scopes I own in a few years.

Most importantly - DONT PANIC. Good luck with your acquisitions!

Cool, thank you very much
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