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Old 05-06-2014, 10:24 AM
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LightningNZ (Cam)
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Colour temperature for post-processing

My current monitor is a nice Viewsonic that I can set to a colour temperature of 5000K. Most people say my photos look too red.

What do you set your screen colour temperature to so that people will see your photos looking "correct"?

Thanks,
Cam

P.S. I hope this is the right section rather than the computer section.
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Old 05-06-2014, 10:53 AM
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Octane (Humayun)
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I wonder if the 5000K setting is only relevant for Viewsonic screens?

It might be a better option to calibrate it using a known device such as a ColorMunki.

H
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:03 PM
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MrB (Simon)
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What I dont understand is, calibrate to what?
To calibrate means to make something as close as possible to something else, like getting your monitor colours to match those of a printer.

To calibrate my monitor to that of the person viewing my images is pointless as most monitors reproduce colours and brightness vastly differently.

So, is there a standard that all astrophotographers use, or should be using?
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Old 06-06-2014, 01:19 PM
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LightningNZ (Cam)
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Thanks guys. I suspect it's a case of damned if I do, damned if I don't - other people are likely viewing with butt-ugly screen settings most of the time so there's little I can do.
-Cam
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Old 06-06-2014, 01:42 PM
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Octane (Humayun)
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And, there lies the crux of the issue!

It's most useful when you are printing or working with others in a controlled environment.

H
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Old 06-06-2014, 02:10 PM
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pluto (Hugh)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrB View Post
What I dont understand is, calibrate to what?
To calibrate means to make something as close as possible to something else, like getting your monitor colours to match those of a printer.
Generally you want your monitor calibrated to REC709/sRGB.

In my experience though, not all monitors are capable of achieving calibration unless you buy a monitor designed to be calibrated, like this one: http://shopping1.hp.com/is-bin/INTER...0AAAEu6fw.zwd2 which will be my next monitor
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Old 06-06-2014, 06:44 PM
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MrB (Simon)
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Interesting, thanks.

My laptop apparently has 95-97% colour gamut. The 2nd gen Nexus7 apparently has 97-103% gamut.
I must admit that images viewed on the Nexus look awesome. Whether that is due to the gamut or the 323ppi display I don't know. Probably a combination of both.
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