#1  
Old 25-07-2019, 12:11 PM
poider (Peter)
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Star adventurer, where to now

Just received my star adventurer for tracking, what should be my first subject.
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Old 25-07-2019, 12:56 PM
raymo
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Your first object, as opposed to subject, should be to familiarise yourself with
obtaining good polar alignment with it, as with poor alignment tracking won't
provide round stars for decent length exposures. [ I assume that you haven't
already done that]. Having said that, the wide field around Antares is
beautiful.
raymo
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Old 25-07-2019, 03:31 PM
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Icearcher (Chris)
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Hi Peter

From experience, the hardest part was getting good polar alignment, once you have that sorted, everything else sort of falls into place.

If I was to suggest a target, I would look at something in the east thats just rising, this will give you all night on target and I would also go something thats pretty big, the shorter your focal length, the less poor alignment will be an issue.

Maybe something like Antares like raymo said or the southern cross region, both are easy to find and line up.
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Old 25-07-2019, 04:05 PM
poider (Peter)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raymo View Post
Your first object, as opposed to subject, should be to familiarise yourself with
obtaining good polar alignment with it, as with poor alignment tracking won't
provide round stars for decent length exposures. [ I assume that you haven't
already done that]. Having said that, the wide field around Antares is
beautiful.
raymo
Yes I will be taking the time to properly align and familiarize myself with all the working of the device.
thank you
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Old 26-07-2019, 05:10 PM
Wavytone (Nick)
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Heavens sake guys, give him a simple answer !

M42 is a summer thing, so seeing as its winter...

1. Moon.
2. Jupiter + Saturn
3. Eta Carina, Omega Centauri, Tarantula nebula...
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Old 01-08-2019, 12:31 AM
Sayfog (Alistair)
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Depending on your lenses and focal lengths the Lagoon and Trifid widefield could be good. Here is an attempt I made when I just got my star adventurer last year, ignore the average processing just get an idea of the FoV, this was a Canon 450D with 200mm lens with a decent amount of cropping.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/7HEVWmfHBbs5vV4u7
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Old 01-08-2019, 06:23 AM
poider (Peter)
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Thank you all, I am still waiting for a clear night, the only non cloudy night so far was full of smoke from all the fireplaces
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Old 01-08-2019, 07:05 AM
Sunfish (Ray)
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I second eta carina for DSO with an adventurer. Big and bright.

I found I had to set mine up with an electronic level and the gps in my camera so it was roughly pointing in the right direction before dark before I could find the Octans stars in the polar scope. Many false leads up there. Also a SW polar clock utility downloaded on my phone to check octans rotation and align by eye through the scope just on dark.

Once there it worked well. Even with a 400 lense. Never used the polar scope light. Hopeless . A red torch works better.
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Old 10-08-2019, 03:24 PM
Merckx (James)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfish View Post
I second eta carina for DSO with an adventurer. Big and bright.
+1

I'd add that the area around scorpius and rho ophiuchi is very colourful and high in the sky at this time of the year.

If you're looking for some inspiration of what is possible with a Star Adventurer, have a look at Eric Benedetti's flickr pages: https://www.flickr.com/photos/75706432@N02/

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfish View Post
Never used the polar scope light. Hopeless . A red torch works better.
Perhaps I need a lower powered red light because when I use mine I have trouble seeing the polar scope markings and the stars of octans at the same time. My eyes aren't getting any younger though!
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Old 10-08-2019, 05:37 PM
astro_nutt
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I've also brought a Star Adventurer. I'll take heed of the advice given here. Carina sounds like a good test subject. cheers!
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Old 12-08-2019, 12:19 PM
poider (Peter)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merckx View Post
+1
Perhaps I need a lower powered red light because when I use mine I have trouble seeing the polar scope markings and the stars of octans at the same time. My eyes aren't getting any younger though!
You can see the stars of Octans,!!!! you must be much younger than me or have better eyes and better skies.
I cannot see them
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Old 12-08-2019, 12:42 PM
Sunfish (Ray)
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Without seeing octans and the asterism through the polar scope I suppose you can use a polar camera for rough alignment or gps.

The asterism can be seen more easily at dusk or flashing through the polar scope with a red light. Polar scope focus needs to be set up correctly with time for night vision, with any light screened , to see octans. With the polar clock utility on a phone to check, seeing the asterism on the polar scope or setting up the time rotation is not such an issue but you need to see octans.
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