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Old 10-09-2021, 12:27 PM
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DiscoDuck (Paul)
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RC8 mirror cleaning

Does anyone have any advice on the best way to clean the mirrors on a GSO RC8?

Ideally, given that collimation is a pain, I'd like to do it with the mirrors in situ. Is that possible or too risky?

Otherwise, looking for a minimal impact on mirror setup solution that is easy!

I am not looking for a perfectly clean mirror - just happy to take the worst of the grime off. I have had it for 9 years now and never worried about it - but it is now quite poor. I am not sure how much impact it is having on performance, but it seems like it might be sensible to at least get it a bit cleaner.

Edit: looking at it the other way, is there a good way to quantify the impact of the dirt (unfortunately I have no baseline data from when the mirror was clean though, other than the usual lights, flats)?

Last edited by DiscoDuck; 10-09-2021 at 02:09 PM.
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Old 09-10-2021, 06:52 PM
metalage (Adrian)
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I wonder if the telescope clinics run by ASSA might give insight into how to perform this procedure. I think I read once that the primary mirror needs to become quite obstructed before taking a significant hit to performance.

Best I could suggest is use a camera lens blower to get some of the larger dust particles off without touching it. If you do find a way though, I'd be curious to know as well.
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Old 09-10-2021, 07:19 PM
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multiweb (Marc)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DiscoDuck View Post
Does anyone have any advice on the best way to clean the mirrors on a GSO RC8?

Ideally, given that collimation is a pain, I'd like to do it with the mirrors in situ. Is that possible or too risky?

Otherwise, looking for a minimal impact on mirror setup solution that is easy!

I am not looking for a perfectly clean mirror - just happy to take the worst of the grime off. I have had it for 9 years now and never worried about it - but it is now quite poor. I am not sure how much impact it is having on performance, but it seems like it might be sensible to at least get it a bit cleaner.

Edit: looking at it the other way, is there a good way to quantify the impact of the dirt (unfortunately I have no baseline data from when the mirror was clean though, other than the usual lights, flats)?
Can you remove the primary cell from the tube and put it back in place keeping collimation? That would be a way to expose the mirror.
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Old 11-10-2021, 06:58 AM
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DiscoDuck (Paul)
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Originally Posted by multiweb View Post
Can you remove the primary cell from the tube and put it back in place keeping collimation? That would be a way to expose the mirror.
I'll have to investigate. Thanks.
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Old 11-10-2021, 10:53 PM
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DiscoDuck (Paul)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by metalage View Post
I wonder if the telescope clinics run by ASSA might give insight into how to perform this procedure. I think I read once that the primary mirror needs to become quite obstructed before taking a significant hit to performance.

Best I could suggest is use a camera lens blower to get some of the larger dust particles off without touching it. If you do find a way though, I'd be curious to know as well.
Thanks Adrian. I'll give that a go.
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Old 19-10-2021, 09:31 AM
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Another way is to remove the secondary and spider and then clean the primary inside the tube. That would mean that the only change would involve the secondary which is an easy fix for collimation.
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Old 26-10-2021, 11:41 AM
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DiscoDuck (Paul)
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Originally Posted by Paul Haese View Post
Another way is to remove the secondary and spider and then clean the primary inside the tube. That would mean that the only change would involve the secondary which is an easy fix for collimation.
Thanks Paul. That sounds easier than removing the primary.
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