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Old 22-04-2023, 11:32 AM
Rob_K
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Possible nova in Scorpius

Andrew Pearce of WA has discovered a possible nova in Scorpius at mag 8.0 U. I got a rough low-res spectrum of it last night but it didn't show any discernible hydrogen emissions. As I said, it was rough and I'd expect emissions to show up tonight if I get clear sky. It has brightened since Andrew discovered it and it would be a good target for spectroscopy if anyone's out and about tonight. Details at this link:
http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/unco...0-4137160.html

Cheers -
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Old 22-04-2023, 01:45 PM
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Crater101 (Warren)
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I'm not into the spectroscopy side of things, but that's exciting news. Well done to Andrew!
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Old 22-04-2023, 02:28 PM
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I will try if weather permits..
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Old 22-04-2023, 07:46 PM
EpickCrom (Joe)
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Congratulations to Andrew Pearce on his discovery! I will try to observe it tonight.

Thanks for alerting us to it Rob.
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Old 23-04-2023, 12:10 AM
Rob_K
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Emissions have appeared & spectra have now been obtained, and it appears to be an FeII-type classical nova, congratulations Andrew! Waiting on a CBET to be issued now. I got another poor low-res optical spectrum tonight which showed H-beta & H-alpha emissions but it's not worth putting up. Just a little too faint for my set-up unfortunately.

The nova has also been identified as a gamma ray emitter, one of only a very small number of novae to be shown to do this, so it will be of great interest to astronomers.

Cheers -
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Old 29-04-2023, 09:59 PM
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Finally I managed to bag it tonight... through clouds.
H-alpha, H-beta and something else at 359.3..Chromium?


EDIT:
Now I wonder if I correctly identified spectral lines...


EDIT2:
After cross-checking with ARAS spectroscopy forum, I corrected my spectrum, now I believe it is properly calibrated wavelength-wise.
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