Go Back   IceInSpace > Equipment > Equipment Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #21  
Old 14-10-2021, 09:48 PM
ausastronomer (John Bambury)
Registered User

ausastronomer is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Shoalhaven Heads, NSW
Posts: 2,541
The other thing to also consider with a really fast scope, despite what some US opticians will tell you, is that it's a lot harder to get a sub F4 mirror to the same standard as a > F4 mirror every time. Despite the reputations of a couple of US mirror makers, I've seen sub F4 ash trays from a couple of sources and in both cases the mirror maker wouldn't accept the fact the mirror wasn't up to standard. Suffice to say there's a really good reason Carl Zambuto will not make sub F4 mirrors. That having been said, I've also seen a couple of outstanding F4 mirrors, but there's more pot luck going faster than F4, particularly if the mirror maker is 10,000 miles away and won't acknowledge the problem.

A sub F4 mirror is also exponentially more expensive than a mirror slower than F4.

Cheers
John B
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 15-10-2021, 11:42 AM
wavelandscott's Avatar
wavelandscott (Scott)
Plays well with others!

wavelandscott is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Ridgefield CT USA
Posts: 3,376
But I will add that an f4 Zambuto mirror is a glorious thing…
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 15-10-2021, 01:52 PM
ausastronomer (John Bambury)
Registered User

ausastronomer is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Shoalhaven Heads, NSW
Posts: 2,541
Quote:
Originally Posted by wavelandscott View Post
But I will add that an f4 Zambuto mirror is a glorious thing…
Hi Scott,

Amateur telescope mirrors don't get any better than one from Carl Zambuto, or Mark Suchting. The "contrast" is the thing and it's next level.

You won't get a new mirror from Mark these days, but 2nd hand ones do surface from time to time on the classifieds, or through clubs and often at very good prices. Carl is retiring in 12 to 18 mths and already has a huge back log and is very much limiting the orders he takes, although I think he is still taking orders from Peter Read at the moment.

Cheers
John B
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 15-10-2021, 05:48 PM
m11 (Mel)
Registered User

m11 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 475
Carl Zambuto retiring will leave a huge hole for acquiring premium quality mirrors.

I hope that someone takes over Carl's business and continues on providing this service to the Astro community.

Last edited by m11; 15-10-2021 at 07:43 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 16-10-2021, 06:20 AM
gregbradley's Avatar
gregbradley
Registered User

gregbradley is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 17,229
Yes like when Roland Christen decides to retire.

Thanks for all the responses. Most helpful. I have looked through a large dob on a ladder at Derbys Falls. It was great but I don't fancy using a ladder all the time.

I think I'll go with something around 12 inches, it sounds a nice balance between aperture and practicality.

Greg.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 16-10-2021, 11:12 AM
ausastronomer (John Bambury)
Registered User

ausastronomer is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Shoalhaven Heads, NSW
Posts: 2,541
Quote:
Originally Posted by m11 View Post
Carl Zambuto retiring will leave a huge hole for acquiring premium quality mirrors.

I hope that someone takes over Carl's business and continues on providing this service to the Astro community.
Hi Mel,

If you think about the retirees in the past 10 or 12 years from those mirror makers who supplied the amateur market, it's unfortunately a hole that will never be plugged. The influx of cheap mass produced mirrors in apertures up to 20" and old age have been contributors, as have rising glass costs and low profit margins.

Mark Suchting
James Mulherin (OMI)
John Hall (Pegasus)
Ed Stevens (Zambuto Optical & Stevens Optical)
John Hudek (Galaxy Optics)
Jerry Wilkinson (Galaxy Optics)
Vaughn Parsons (Intermountain Optics)
Steve Dodds (Nova Optical)
Bob Royce (Royce Optical)

There's probably 2 or 3 others that I have missed.

Unfortunately those that are left apart from Carl, don't float my boat, for various reasons, some optical some personal.

Cheers
John B
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 16-10-2021, 12:17 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 5,748
The vast majority of amateurs around the world have never had the opportunity to use or own a premium mirror equipped scope, so will not miss
what they've never had. I imagine these scopes will enjoy an increase in value once new ones become virtually unobtainable.
We of the smaller budgets can be thankful that we have access to decent
quality mirrors from China. Now if China stopped production, that would leave
a truly enormous gap to be filled, and I have no idea who could do that.
Whilst current Chinese mirrors obviously can't compete with premium ones,
they are d------ good value for money.
When I bought my first scope 72 yrs ago a 60mm refractor was the norm,
75mm were too expensive, and 4 or 6" reflector, 8" was also too expensive,
and anything larger than 8" was the territory of the truly wealthy.
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 16-10-2021, 03:35 PM
m11 (Mel)
Registered User

m11 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by ausastronomer View Post
Hi Mel,

If you think about the retirees in the past 10 or 12 years from those mirror makers who supplied the amateur market, it's unfortunately a hole that will never be plugged. The influx of cheap mass produced mirrors in apertures up to 20" and old age have been contributors, as have rising glass costs and low profit margins.

Mark Suchting
James Mulherin (OMI)
John Hall (Pegasus)
Ed Stevens (Zambuto Optical & Stevens Optical)
John Hudek (Galaxy Optics)
Jerry Wilkinson (Galaxy Optics)
Vaughn Parsons (Intermountain Optics)
Steve Dodds (Nova Optical)
Bob Royce (Royce Optical)

There's probably 2 or 3 others that I have missed.

Unfortunately those that are left apart from Carl, don't float my boat, for various reasons, some optical some personal.

Cheers
John B
Wow ok, I am only aware of some of the names you listed. I think it is sad that their knowledge and capabilities are not around anymore.

Thanks for the list,

Mel
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 16-10-2021, 03:42 PM
m11 (Mel)
Registered User

m11 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymo View Post
The vast majority of amateurs around the world have never had the opportunity to use or own a premium mirror equipped scope, so will not miss
what they've never had. I imagine these scopes will enjoy an increase in value once new ones become virtually unobtainable.
We of the smaller budgets can be thankful that we have access to decent
quality mirrors from China. Now if China stopped production, that would leave
a truly enormous gap to be filled, and I have no idea who could do that.
Whilst current Chinese mirrors obviously can't compete with premium ones,
they are d------ good value for money.
When I bought my first scope 72 yrs ago a 60mm refractor was the norm,
75mm were too expensive, and 4 or 6" reflector, 8" was also too expensive,
and anything larger than 8" was the territory of the truly wealthy.
raymo
I do think they offer great bang for buck and makes the night skies more accessible for sure.
The Skywatcher/Orion/Bintel/GSO dobsonians have all been great to view with.

When you get above 20" there is more a need to go custom and then find a scope maker. I know I don't have the skills to make a dobsonian structure so need to defer to Pete to make the scope.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 17-10-2021, 05:48 AM
wavelandscott's Avatar
wavelandscott (Scott)
Plays well with others!

wavelandscott is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Ridgefield CT USA
Posts: 3,376
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregbradley View Post
Yes like when Roland Christen decides to retire.

Thanks for all the responses. …..I don't fancy using a ladder all the time.

I think I'll go with something around 12 inches, it sounds a nice balance between aperture and practicality.

Greg.
Pulling from your quote…

I think that 10-12 inch place is a good place to be and allows you to keep both feet firmly on the ground.

Get an adjustable height chair and you will be off to the visual races…

Enjoy!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 07:51 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Testar
Advertisement
Limpet Controller
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement