#1  
Old 08-10-2013, 06:59 AM
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Are These EP's a Good Match?

G'day every one,

I'm building an 8 inch f6 newt and was thinking of getting the 14 and 20 mm ES 100 degree eyepieces with a 2 inch 2x Barlow, are these good EP's and would they work well with this setup? Price isn't too big of a problem but I'd like to keep under $500 each.

Also, what would be a good planetary eyepiece?

I don't have any experience with expensive eyepieces as I've never had the money to buy any but I'm building this telescope for another guy and have been told to some good EP's and filters, he lives in Brisbane so would a UHC filter be handy?

Any recommendations would be awesome

Cheers
Jo
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  #2  
Old 08-10-2013, 08:41 AM
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dannat (Daniel)
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the ep's should work fine -they are heavy though for a relatively small scope & you hve have balance issues, the 14mm in 2x barow will be a good magnification for planetary views but it is going to be a heavy & long projection out from the focuser
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Old 08-10-2013, 09:14 AM
casstony
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An 8" scope won't be good for most DSO's in Brisbane, even with light pollution filters, in which case I'd focus on planetary viewing. Televue Delos would be the best option in that case, or for less money the Explore Scientific 6.7mm and 11mm 82 degree eyepieces are good.

If the owner was going to travel out of town I'd suggest the Explore Scientific 30mm 82 degree and a UHC filter in addition to the shorter focal length eyepieces mentioned above.
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Old 08-10-2013, 10:13 AM
mercedes_sl1970
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I use a 14mm ES eyepiece with an 8" f6 dob and the views are superb for DSOs. For planetary, would not (as mentioned above) recommend barlowing the 14mm as it will be very heavy/unwieldy. Suggest the Pentax 8.5mm xf, or Pentax xw 7/10, or Vixen lvws. The Delos are supposed to be rather good too. Lots of choices!

Andrew
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Old 08-10-2013, 01:57 PM
David Niven (David Niven)
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The 6.7mm 82D Exp Scientific and the Pentax XF 8.5mm is my choice.
Can't go wrong with them.
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Old 08-10-2013, 08:19 PM
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AG Hybrid (Adrian)
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As someone who has both Delos, a Pentax and ES eyepieces I would recommend starting on ES 82 degree eyepieces. Their considerably cheaper. For the price of a ES 14 100 and a bit of change for shipping, you could get 3 ES 82's. They are also much much lighter. The views are immersive and sharp.

For your 8" setup. I would go with 4 eyepieces. The 4.7mm,8.8mm,14mm and the 24mm(2 inch eyepiece). Gives a nice spread of magnifications and exit pupils.
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Old 08-10-2013, 08:42 PM
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Thanks a lot for all your replies everyone, it looks like I might leave out the barlow and look into some shorter fl length EP's (sorry about the pun)

I'll be seriously considering what Adrian has suggested.


Jo
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  #8  
Old 10-10-2013, 10:18 AM
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Good advice Adrian , I would also get the 82* eyepieces , a better deal all around .
Brian.
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  #9  
Old 10-10-2013, 11:51 AM
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Hi Jo,

Eyepiece wise, while barlows 'do' work, in the end they tend to just get in the way. As others have suggested too, you would be better off with a dedicated high magnification eyepiece than with a barlow. Another thing they do is add considerable weight to the top end of a scope if coupled to a large eyepiece.

Another thing not ever mentioned about barlows is that not all eyepieces work well with them. This is compounded by the optical system of the scope you are using. A barlow can alter the shape of the light cone to such a degree that an eyepiece that gives you a nice image neat, becomes terrible when the barlow is employed. And not all barlows are built the same way: my cheapie 1.25" GSO barlow is great when I use it in my f/4 Newtonian, but the image is poor when I use my 2" GSO ED barlow (both 2X).

There are some very good eyepieces suggested by others. But I wouldn't suggest you buy one over another, ESPECIALLY for someone else. They will better served straight off getting simple plossls to get started, and then trying out other people's EPs at a star party. The process is longer, but the result is better. What someone finds comfortable and easy to use as an eyepiece varies greatly.

Filter wise, an OIII filter will be more useful for viewing from the big smoke than an UHC type. A UHC is just too narrow in bandwidth transmission for the best results in urban areas. It will work, but an OIII is brighter image wise and with the number of stars it will show. What you can do with 1.25" OIII filter is also make yourself a "blinking paddle" that you use to blink out tiny planetary nebulae so they reveal themselves from their surrounds. While DSO viewing in the city is always second best, blinking for PN's is actually something that's very effective. I've been successful in chasing some of the tiny PN's in the cluster M7 from my home in Sydney. I've attached a pic of my blinking paddle. It's just a piece of MDF that I can screw into a 1.25" OIII filter. I then flick the filter between my eye and the EP. It is very effective and I'd say pretty much the only way to find small planetary nebulae that quite literally are invisible without a filter. With a blinking paddle, these invisible planetary nebulae quite literally "POP" out. Oh, and an OIII filter is better for PN's than an UHC filter.

Mental.
Attached Thumbnails
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Old 10-10-2013, 01:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mental4astro View Post

Filter wise, an OIII filter will be more useful for viewing from the big smoke than an UHC type. A UHC is just too narrow in bandwidth transmission for the best results in urban areas. It will work, but an OIII is brighter image wise and with the number of stars it will show. What you can do with 1.25" OIII filter is also make yourself a "blinking paddle" that you use to blink out tiny planetary nebulae so they reveal themselves from their surrounds. While DSO viewing in the city is always second best, blinking for PN's is actually something that's very effective. I've been successful in chasing some of the tiny PN's in the cluster M7 from my home in Sydney. I've attached a pic of my blinking paddle. It's just a piece of MDF that I can screw into a 1.25" OIII filter. I then flick the filter between my eye and the EP. It is very effective and I'd say pretty much the only way to find small planetary nebulae that quite literally are invisible without a filter. With a blinking paddle, these invisible planetary nebulae quite literally "POP" out. Oh, and an OIII filter is better for PN's than an UHC filter.

Mental.

Alex are you sure you have that the right way round? My UHC -S filter has a broader band then my OIII. In the UHC nebulosity pops out more than no filter but still lets in enough light for most stars to shine through. My filter of choice for the LMC and SMC. My OIII filter on the other hand hits star light like an anvil. But nebulosity in the 10nm range aka OIII is turned up to 11. But, I agree an OIII filter is better for heavy light polluted skies.

I tried that blinking paddle technique on the week end. Just held a filter up to the eyepiece quickly while looking for the Veil and other faint nebula and it worked like a charm. A very clever observing technique.
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  #11  
Old 10-10-2013, 09:20 PM
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Hi Joe
Gotta weigh into this one. Under 10mm my favourites are the Pentax XW's..got 4 of them, miles and miles ahead of the ES 82's. Also have the 9 14 and 20mm 100's, just beautiful in my f8 refractor. So if your spending some one else's cash and have to do the ES thing just get the 3 100's and sometime soon ES will come out with a 5.5mm 100. Easy....
Best filter is a car and a dark site to go there.
Matt
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Old 14-10-2013, 12:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mental4astro View Post
Hi Jo,

Eyepiece wise, while barlows 'do' work, in the end they tend to just get in the way. As others have suggested too, you would be better off with a dedicated high magnification eyepiece than with a barlow. Another thing they do is add considerable weight to the top end of a scope if coupled to a large eyepiece.

Another thing not ever mentioned about barlows is that not all eyepieces work well with them. This is compounded by the optical system of the scope you are using. A barlow can alter the shape of the light cone to such a degree that an eyepiece that gives you a nice image neat, becomes terrible when the barlow is employed. And not all barlows are built the same way: my cheapie 1.25" GSO barlow is great when I use it in my f/4 Newtonian, but the image is poor when I use my 2" GSO ED barlow (both 2X).

There are some very good eyepieces suggested by others. But I wouldn't suggest you buy one over another, ESPECIALLY for someone else. They will better served straight off getting simple plossls to get started, and then trying out other people's EPs at a star party. The process is longer, but the result is better. What someone finds comfortable and easy to use as an eyepiece varies greatly.

Filter wise, an OIII filter will be more useful for viewing from the big smoke than an UHC type. A UHC is just too narrow in bandwidth transmission for the best results in urban areas. It will work, but an OIII is brighter image wise and with the number of stars it will show. What you can do with 1.25" OIII filter is also make yourself a "blinking paddle" that you use to blink out tiny planetary nebulae so they reveal themselves from their surrounds. While DSO viewing in the city is always second best, blinking for PN's is actually something that's very effective. I've been successful in chasing some of the tiny PN's in the cluster M7 from my home in Sydney. I've attached a pic of my blinking paddle. It's just a piece of MDF that I can screw into a 1.25" OIII filter. I then flick the filter between my eye and the EP. It is very effective and I'd say pretty much the only way to find small planetary nebulae that quite literally are invisible without a filter. With a blinking paddle, these invisible planetary nebulae quite literally "POP" out. Oh, and an OIII filter is better for PN's than an UHC filter.

Mental.
Thanks a lot Mental

Barlows look like they could be a bit iffy and just add extra weight so I think I'll stay away from them.

Cost not being much of a problem, (he's the CEO of some company) I was sort of thinking that the ES EP's might be a good starting option?

What you say about the filters is interesting, I might have to start looking into getting one myself. Do they make much difference if you've got dark skies? I was obsurving vail nebula the other night with my 6 inch newt and wondered what it would be like with a filter.

Cheers
Jo
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Old 08-11-2013, 09:45 PM
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Just thought I'd let you know, I decided for the first EP's the ES 82's would be alright so I've ordered the 4.7mm, 8.8mm, 14mm, and 24mm. I think these should work OK? Well I guess it's to late to change my mind now.

Cheers

Jo
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Old 09-11-2013, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nebulosity. View Post
Just thought I'd let you know, I decided for the first EP's the ES 82's would be alright so I've ordered the 4.7mm, 8.8mm, 14mm, and 24mm. I think these should work OK? Well I guess it's to late to change my mind now.

Cheers

Jo
You'll love'em.
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Old 09-11-2013, 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by nebulosity. View Post
Just thought I'd let you know, I decided for the first EP's the ES 82's would be alright so I've ordered the 4.7mm, 8.8mm, 14mm, and 24mm. I think these should work OK? Well I guess it's to late to change my mind now.

Cheers

Jo
I have the 4.7mm, 6.7mm, 8.8mm and 14mm ES 82D eyepieces and they are very good performers. No-one could possibly accuse you of making a "bad" decision!

Let the CEO decide down the track if he wants to spend extra money on the premium brands.
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Old 15-11-2013, 08:09 PM
GB
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These ES are my wishlist for X mas.
Hope Santa will delivers.
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Old 15-11-2013, 10:25 PM
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Hope Santa will delivers.
Do you mean the Australia Air Service? They have always been the ones who have delivered them for me.
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Old 16-11-2013, 09:23 PM
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Hi Adrian,
Santa....my wife.
I have given her my wishlist for the coming merry season .
Don't really need the 100D ES, as they are pricey and not much hope of getting them.
Keeping my fingerd x for a couple of the 82D, the 4.7 and the 9mm.
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