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Old 09-05-2024, 09:01 AM
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cafuego (Peter)
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The Core

But not like that terrible, terrible movie.

No Moon means you can use shorter focal length glass, right? This is an 294MC staring at the galactic center for five hours through a zwo duo filter and a Sigma Art 35mm f/1.4 (stopped down a bit)

Unfortunately, modern DSLR (and probably mirrorless) lenses come without manual aperture rings, which means you need to wedge bits of plastic into their mechanism if you want to stop them down a bit for shaper images. Still waiting for the DSLR/M42 adapter manufacturers to catch on and add aperture rings to their products.

In the mean time, I didn't stop this one down enough and didn't focus quite right, so there is a spot of coma and blurriness.

I like the field of view though, all the bright Ha menagerie from the Prawn to the Eagle ;-)
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Old 09-05-2024, 09:07 AM
Dave882 (David)
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Nice one Peter itís a beautiful widefield and nicely framed too!
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Old 09-05-2024, 07:03 PM
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AstroViking (Steve)
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Very nicely done!
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Old 14-05-2024, 07:02 AM
Plossl68 (Paul)
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Hi Peter,

Love the image.

Just on your plastic wedges, I donít know about Sigmas, but with my Canon lenses, when I want to stop them down to use on an Astro camera, I pop them on my dslr, stop them down and then remove them without turning the camera off and voila, they hold whichever f-stop they were last set at. Yes, itís a bit finicky if you want to try multiple f-stops, but no need for wedges.

Cheers,
Paul


Quote:
Originally Posted by cafuego View Post
But not like that terrible, terrible movie.

No Moon means you can use shorter focal length glass, right? This is an 294MC staring at the galactic center for five hours through a zwo duo filter and a Sigma Art 35mm f/1.4 (stopped down a bit)

Unfortunately, modern DSLR (and probably mirrorless) lenses come without manual aperture rings, which means you need to wedge bits of plastic into their mechanism if you want to stop them down a bit for shaper images. Still waiting for the DSLR/M42 adapter manufacturers to catch on and add aperture rings to their products.

In the mean time, I didn't stop this one down enough and didn't focus quite right, so there is a spot of coma and blurriness.

I like the field of view though, all the bright Ha menagerie from the Prawn to the Eagle ;-)
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Old 15-05-2024, 11:32 AM
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cafuego (Peter)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plossl68 View Post
Hi Peter,

Love the image.

Just on your plastic wedges, I don’t know about Sigmas, but with my Canon lenses, when I want to stop them down to use on an Astro camera, I pop them on my dslr, stop them down and then remove them without turning the camera off and voila, they hold whichever f-stop they were last set at. Yes, it’s a bit finicky if you want to try multiple f-stops, but no need for wedges.

Cheers,
Paul
There's a spring in the mechanism for the Sigma Nikon lenses, which makes the aperture always jump back to as small as possible when the lens isn't installed. The same is true for Nikon lenses, for that matter
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Old 16-05-2024, 08:32 AM
Plossl68 (Paul)
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Darn it. Clearly they need to think more broadly about just where their excellent lenses are destined to be used.

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There's a spring in the mechanism for the Sigma Nikon lenses, which makes the aperture always jump back to as small as possible when the lens isn't installed. The same is true for Nikon lenses, for that matter
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Old 26-05-2024, 05:20 PM
carlstronomy (Carl)
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Nice work, great image
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