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Old 04-07-2022, 06:08 AM
Hans Tucker (Hans)
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Watch NASA Release the First James Webb Space Telescope Images

on July 12, NASA will be releasing the first full-fledged images taken by the James Webb Space Telescope.

The JWST team will hold a main event to unveil the telescope's images in real time on Tuesday, July 12, at 7:30 a.m. PT [Australia: July 13, 1:30 a.m. AEDT]

Link to watch the Event

https://youtu.be/21X5lGlDOfg
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Old 04-07-2022, 05:59 PM
Spyrith (Dave)
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I'm unreasonably hyped for this, it makes me feel like a nerd and I love it.

Any idea if these will be just infrared images, or also infrared images colored in realistic colors?
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Old 05-07-2022, 07:36 PM
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Crater101 (Warren)
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Thanks for the link. I'm sure I'm not alone in wanting to see what the James Webb can do.
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Old 07-07-2022, 08:31 AM
EpickCrom (Joe)
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Thanks for the link Hans, like all of us I will be watching with deep anticipation. This is truly a golden age of Astronomy we are living in
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Old 09-07-2022, 07:11 AM
julianh72 (Julian)
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The first targets have been announced:

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard...s-first-images

Not long to wait now!
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Old 09-07-2022, 09:47 AM
Saturnine (Jeff)
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No doubt there would be a lot of people that are keenly awaiting the release of these first images, and subsequent releases. The list of images in the first release including Eta Carina as one of them will be eagerly anticipated. Wednesday morning can't come soon enough.
Thanks for the links.
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Old 09-07-2022, 11:42 AM
AdamJL
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Carina

But I was hoping they'd keep the list to themselves. It would have been nicer to have been surprised.

that said, it's a nice range of targets. I am really interested in the planetary spectrum data. That will be fascinating...
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Old 09-07-2022, 12:47 PM
JA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyrith View Post
I'm unreasonably hyped for this, it makes me feel like a nerd and I love it.

Any idea if these will be just infrared images, or also infrared images colored in realistic colors?
Well their sensor/s capture approximately 600nm and longer, so if they opt for natural colours it will be orange/reds/maybe some brownish tinges, otherwise if it's false colour, who knows?

Best
JA
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Old 11-07-2022, 05:30 PM
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mura_gadi (Steve)
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Biden to release a JWT shot sooner!!!

Its like waiting for Christmas as a kid again!

Apparently the POTUS will have a picture release a full day prior to the NASA release. At 5pm Monday, Washington, DC time.(I think) NASA full release to follow on Tuesday at 10:30am as stated.

So, Tomorrow morning sometime after 7am!

"The image, known as "Webb's First Deep Field," will be the deepest and highest-resolution view of the universe ever captured, showing myriad galaxies as they appeared up to 13 billion years in the past, according to NASA."


Steve

"NASA will brief the president and the vice president on Monday, agency officials said, and the first image will be revealed at an event at 5 p.m. ET at the White House"


"After the White House event, NASA will unveil more images in an event streamed live Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. ET. NASA officials said that batch will include the Webb telescope’s first spectrum of an exoplanet, showing light emitted at different wavelengths from a planet in another star system."

*My understanding is that some of Tuesday pictures will be coloured according to the spectrum results.

Last edited by mura_gadi; 11-07-2022 at 09:10 PM.
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Old 12-07-2022, 07:08 AM
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Here is a link to the press conference, due to start 7:30 this morning. Includes several other links to NASA/Facebook/YT broadcasts etc.

https://au.pcmag.com/news/95038/watc...lescope-images

Also looks like we have a list of the objects being released today and tomorrow.
https://au.pcmag.com/news/95004/firs...e-and-galaxies
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Old 12-07-2022, 08:30 AM
AdamJL
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The first image:

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/f...cs0723-5mb.jpg

https://www.nasa.gov/webbfirstimages
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Old 12-07-2022, 08:57 AM
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love the warped out sombrero galaxy...

The first shot shows the equivalent sky of a piece of sand on your finger tip held out at arms length.
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Old 12-07-2022, 09:21 AM
Dave882 (David)
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Wonderful view. Gotta love the gravitational lensing effect!!
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Old 12-07-2022, 10:09 AM
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I find NASA’s description “Webb’s image covers a patch of sky approximately the size of a grain of sand held at arm’s length by someone on the ground” a bit odd, TBH. What’s that in arc seconds, I wonder? Sand comes in all sorts of grain sizes, not to mention arms…
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Old 12-07-2022, 10:25 AM
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There's a lot of gravitational lensing going on. Other than that it looks a lot like. Hubble deep-field. Come to think of it, why do we see more lensing here than in the HDF?

Markus
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Old 12-07-2022, 12:22 PM
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Wow - what a great image.
It is hard to know how good it is unless compared with a previous image.
I assume these old images are from Hubble?
https://archive.stsci.edu/prepds/rel...cs0723-73.html

It's obviously much better than the images above.

I would like to know a lot more about it:
Which colours were mapped to which infrared wavelengths?
How many exposures?
What was the length of time of each exposure?

It's a pity that JWST uses a triple armed cradle to hold the secondary
as the six main diffraction spikes - and many more - it makes are annoying.



cheers
Allan
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Old 12-07-2022, 12:32 PM
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My first thought was that the camera back focus was incorrectly set but the outer stars are good. See https://optcorp.com/blogs/deep-sky-i...%20the%20image.

Perhaps its the grain of sand in the image plane causing the strong lensing effect.

Lots of galaxies to see there! Well done, Webb!
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Old 12-07-2022, 01:17 PM
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Stonius (Markus)
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To answer my own question, I'm assuming this is a narrower and deeper field of view than the Hubble deep field. So galaxies are more closely aligned and the light is travelling farther with more opportunity to 'get bent' as it were.

Edit - just found out it's due to a foreground galaxy cluster, hence the radial pattern

Markus

Last edited by Stonius; 12-07-2022 at 03:57 PM.
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Old 12-07-2022, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpal View Post
Wow - what a great image.
I would like to know a lot more about it:
Which colours were mapped to which infrared wavelengths?
How many exposures?
What was the length of time of each exposure?

cheers
Allan
You can see what colours were mapped to what filter here....

https://webbtelescope.org/contents/m...P5SZ?news=true
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  #20  
Old 12-07-2022, 01:42 PM
Startrek (Martin)
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Incredible image !
Looking forward to see many more images from the JWT
However at this early stage I still prefer observing that Hubble image from 2004, just something about it that gives you a wider perspective on the universe
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