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  #41  
Old 26-10-2011, 01:14 AM
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Greg Bock (Greg Bock)
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FYI

Stuart has updated BOSS info here if you are interested.
http://parkdale-supernova-factory.webs.com/bossteam.htm

One of the pics of my observatory there shows just how small it really is...that's why I call it a 'micro-observatory'.


goodnight all, storm coming, must get some sleep!
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  #42  
Old 26-10-2011, 05:25 AM
Ross G
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What an amazing story.

Congratulations Greg.


Ross.
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  #43  
Old 26-10-2011, 07:48 AM
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jjjnettie (Jeanette)
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Congratulations Greg. All that hard work, and finally one of your own. Well done!!!
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  #44  
Old 26-10-2011, 07:51 AM
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Fantastic!

Congratulations, Greg!!! Well done!
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  #45  
Old 26-10-2011, 08:40 AM
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Light curve of a type IIP supernova

Here is the light curve of a typical type II-P supernova, from the paper by Kasen and Woosley (as cited in a previous post)

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It is most remarkable how the visual (V-band), red (R-band), and near-infrared (I-band) light of a typical Type II-P Supernova stays constant for a long time. In contrast, the Blue (B-band) light falls off steadily, and the very-near-ultraviolet (U-band) light falls off rapidly.

The strong pulse of U-band (very near ultraviolet) light at the very beginning of the supernova event also looks extremely interesting.

These "exploding critters" do some strange things!
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