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Old 15-09-2019, 10:55 PM
eclectiK (Roger)
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Jupiter and Saturn

How does one get clearer images of Jupiter and Saturn? Is it purely a luck of the draw on the atmosphere?

My second go from yesterday's viewing 15/9/19 - in light polluted sydney.

Cheers
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Old 15-09-2019, 11:37 PM
Saturnine (Jeff)
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We would need to know what gear you are using , what capture methods are employed. Is it a single image with a dslr or a stack of video frames etc. Then we may be able to give some advice.
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Old 16-09-2019, 07:37 AM
eclectiK (Roger)
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Woop sorry

Meade lx200 10inch,
Filmed with DSLR d810 / friends mirrorless Sony 5600
@1080p 24f and 4k 24f

3 min clip, processed in PIPP, then autostakkert, then wavelets and unsharp mask in pixinsight.

Cheers.
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Old 16-09-2019, 07:47 AM
Startrek (Martin)
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These are great planetary images
Jupiter has an orange film on top and blue film on the bottom due to atmospheric dispersion, nothing you can do about it except for capturing the planet up nice and high to reduce the effect. Iíve tried removing it with Registax 6 but to no avail
Image scale and atmospheric conditions are 2 main governing factors for planetary imaging. Always aim to capture your planets higher than 60 deg in Altitude if possible
Well done !!
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Old 16-09-2019, 08:30 AM
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Retrograde (Pete)
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They are pretty good!

Other things you could consider would be either a Barlow or Powermate to increase the image scale and/or a planetary camera. Planetary cameras have small pixels and high capture frame rates which help with both image scale and cutting through the seeing. Planetary cameras are relatively cheap as far as imaging equipment goes.
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Old 16-09-2019, 10:49 AM
Saturnine (Jeff)
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In answer to one of your questions, yes , seeing conditions can make a huge difference, most nights are not greeted by steady seeing in this part of the country. When you do get a steady night you will notice the difference pretty quickly. As Startrek ( Martin ) also said, imaging while the planet or moon are still as high as possible in the sky also helps the seeing to be as good as possible at the time. That may not always be possible if you are trying to capture specific events such as shadow transits, Red Spot etc.
If you are using an dslr for the capture and the sensor has large pixels then you can certainly barlow the system to f20 and get better image scale and resolution. Paying attention to getting precise focus is also most important and getting a fast frame rate helps to freeze the seeing so that Autostakkert etc can have better reference frames to work with.
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Old 16-09-2019, 11:13 AM
eclectiK (Roger)
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Hi All,

Thanks for your comments to date -

not super keen to buy a planetary camera as of yet - my d810 already cost a bombshell and those zwo's dont have a screen which means I now need to drag a laptop outside. etc.

The d810 has probably the smallest pixels - 36mp on a full frame sensor.
Though I do have the 4x powermate and 5x powermate (scored off gumtree) - not as nice as nikon glass, but they are hell of a lot cheaper than nikon lenses.

I will try to image them when they are straight up though and post them here.

Roger.
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Old 16-09-2019, 09:01 PM
foc (Ross)
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Hi! Good to see a new person posting some images. Most of us start our planet image collection with a snap shot next to an eyepiece or taken through the scope in rime position.

Apologies if you know all this,
You do not have to wait until the planets are directly overhead, but do try and image them when they are 30 degrees or higher above the horizon to avoid color effects caused by atmosphere (wont help much if they derive from your optics).

With Jupiter which is a bit hard to focus on if you can catch the Great red spot (GRS) when it can be seen (in transit), that will help focus, otherwise you can use a moon if you cannot see surface features well. With a small scope you can capture for 3 minutes or so for Jupiter and longer for Saturn if you can track well enough to keep the planet in view. That give s you time to collect more images to stack.

In case you need this info: This is one site that will give you information on how high Jupiter (or Saturn etc) is at a particular time and when the GRS of Jupiter is visible and what the moons are doing
.
https://www.calsky.com/cs.cgi?cha=7&sec=6&sub=1

I do not use DSLR for my pics these days but Cloudynights websites has some useful postings on getting into DSLR planetary photography but they take some ferreting out among all the planetary camera postings.

These three examples may be of interest


https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/6...upiter-saturn/

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/6...netary-images/

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/6...-sct-test-two/

I believe, at least until recently, Canon has had the best camera high quality video options for this approach but you can still improve with what ever tool you have.

Cheers
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Old 17-09-2019, 06:16 PM
eclectiK (Roger)
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Hey Ross,

Thanks for the response, yeah I was pretty heavily involved in photography and pretty competent with my camera equipment and Photoshop so new programs are not to hard for me. I still think pixinsight and wavelets is some sort of witchcraft - it's like enchance in movies.

Shameless plug for me here - https://www.instagram.com/rohjer_lee/?hl=en

I did end up getting a used 10:1 Crayford do that may help with the focus issue I have with the current meade sct.

Once all this rain in Sydney clears, I'll try again with it higher and your link below, assuming I get get home from work fast enough. Most of the time I end up imaging near midnight.

Cheers,

Roger
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Old 18-09-2019, 05:39 AM
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mynameiscd (Andy)
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Great images Roger,
I didnt know you could use a DSLR for planetary but you have achieved fantastic results under light polluted skies and bad seeing.

Cheers
Andy
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