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Old 31-07-2013, 10:37 PM
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naskies (Dave)
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Getting the Hubble look on the Helix Nebula

Hi all,

I really like the gold + blue look to the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) in the famous Hubble image, but haven't been able to replicate it in PhotoShop with Ha/OIII data.

Any suggestions?
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Old 31-07-2013, 11:39 PM
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It took me some time to get it close but still a poor second. I did a lot of blending to and colour adjustment to get it close. Persist and you will get it in the end.
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Old 01-08-2013, 02:58 PM
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I was having a play with this a few weeks ago. I don't know what it would look like if you shot s2 as well but with just ha and 03 I would only expect two colours.
I did make one version that had the red on the outside but as its just a photoshopped version I wouldn't want to show it.
I ended up just using Pixinsight for my bi colour version, you can shift red to a yellow in seconds.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7427/9...22c40d26_b.jpg
Helix Nebula by Raymond Collecutt, on Flickr
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Old 01-08-2013, 04:26 PM
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I found that when i blend the O3 and Ha to make a synthetic green layer that the colours were naturally like this. I am going to be working on a rendition of this for the next few months, up too 4.5 hours of Ha.
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Old 01-08-2013, 05:27 PM
jase (Jason)
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Effective use of object masks in Photoshop will deliver the result you are looking for. Work on the individual emissions lines as object masks to ensure you get the hue and saturation you desire without compromising other areas of the image. I did this for my rendition of the Helix Nebula.

If you want to good tutorial on the power of object masks, look no further than the adobe site - http://tv.adobe.com/watch/the-russel...photoshop-cs5/

This is the reason why Photoshop is king of image processing tools.
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Old 02-08-2013, 09:23 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions, gents.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jase View Post
Effective use of object masks in Photoshop will deliver the result you are looking for. Work on the individual emissions lines as object masks to ensure you get the hue and saturation you desire without compromising other areas of the image. I did this for my rendition of the Helix Nebula.

If you want to good tutorial on the power of object masks, look no further than the adobe site - http://tv.adobe.com/watch/the-russel...photoshop-cs5/

This is the reason why Photoshop is king of image processing tools.
Yep, I've seen your rendition - fantastic stuff

I see that you mapped the colours as R=SII G=Ha B=OIII... did you use object masks to balance out the extremely weak SII compared to the strong Ha?
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Old 03-08-2013, 10:17 AM
jase (Jason)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by naskies View Post
I see that you mapped the colours as R=SII G=Ha B=OIII... did you use object masks to balance out the extremely weak SII compared to the strong Ha?
The image was done back in 2009 so I don't recall the specifics. All the images I work on I typically take notes on the processing. In the folder where the original files reside the notes entail that I used sum combine to get as much possible signal in SII. Keep in mind that the data was acquired with a camera that is back-illuminated with a QE of 95%+ so signal overall wasn't a real problem. The note also states that PS clipping masks were used to display each SII and OIII emission line evenly with Ha opacity dropped to 60%. The Ha was then relayed as a luminance to drop in more detail. Object masks were then applied to selectively boost the SII burnt orange hue and accentuate the OIII spikes as they radiate out from the center. I use object masks quite a lot in processing and they've come along way in CS5. CS3 were ever so painful and time consuming. Really Photoshop is based on masks. Its one of if not the most important aspects to understand and for the work we do with astro images, I find its usage critical as rarely would we want to apply contrast adjustments, filters, etc to the entire image.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:25 PM
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Thanks for the explanation and tips, Jase. I'll definitely have to learn more about object masks.
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