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Old 10-11-2012, 09:20 AM
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gregbradley
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How are these images produced?

I am wanting to know what the best technique is for this type of image?

http://www.google.com.au/imgres?imgu...Q9QEwCg&dur=49

Often done on Moon shots.

Is it keeping the camera on a fixed tripod position. Taking regular photos at even spacings and then layering it on an image taken of the environment as a separate image? So its a composite?

Some Nikon cameras have an interval feature where you can set it to take a photo of specific settings at a set interval. That could be handy for this type of shot which is a good way to image an eclipse event.

Greg.
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Old 10-11-2012, 09:26 AM
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mithrandir (Andrew)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregbradley View Post
Is it keeping the camera on a fixed tripod position. Taking regular photos at even spacings and then layering it on an image taken of the environment as a separate image? So its a composite?
That's how I'd do it. With a digital timer remote and bracketed exposures. The horizon could be chosen from one image, but should overlay correctly.
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Old 10-11-2012, 11:24 AM
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When you say bracketed exposures - why would bracketing help? So you could select the exposure that best matched the others in slightly changing light?

I have bracketing as on my list of to learn - I haven't ever really used it but know its a function of most DSLRs. Is it useful?

Greg.
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Old 10-11-2012, 12:00 PM
roughy (Mark)
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In the context of which you are interested, I have no knowledge of the benefits of bracketing. However it is a great tool for producing landscape shots using high dynamic range (HDR), combining an even and offset exposures of the same scene. Better than the inbuilt HDR function on my camera, as this only takes two exposures. On my Nikon I set the exposure compensation a preferred value above and below even and take the three shots. These can then be combined in photoshop to provide an image with the best highlights of each exposure.

There are a couple of online magazines, NPhoto (a Nikon specific magazine) and Practical Photoshop that often have articles on HDR imaging and processing.
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Old 10-11-2012, 12:14 PM
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iceman (Mike)
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Greg I think that type of image would use no filter when the sun is very low, use a solar filter when the image is high (to get the partial stage), and no filter during totality.

All of those images could be merged (lighten mode, or careful cutting and pasting) onto a background image, usually the one taken at totality or early dawn I'd suggest.
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Old 10-11-2012, 01:36 PM
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That sort of sequence requires perfectly clear skies. I don't think Cairns will be cloud free eclipse morning.
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Old 10-11-2012, 03:51 PM
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Hi Greg
I have a print of that same pic up at the observatory .
As far as I can recall when talking to the guy who made the pic , it was taken on a Pentax 645 ( film ) and just did a multi exposure on the one frame.
Its of the 2003 eclipse.

Zane
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Old 12-11-2012, 08:20 PM
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No way the fruitcake would have produced this pic,
Geoff
You're doing a disservice to fruit cake !
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Old 12-11-2012, 09:02 PM
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mmmm fruit cake.......arrrrrrrrr

Although, I think I might keep my third eye on the lookout for some of the special "brownies" that this chick is eating.......I will have to make sure that I come down again before the Pleiadians infuse my being with spiritual energy into my cosmic life force......

Fair evening to you all in the Planet Earth collective......

LMFAO.......

Cheers

Chris
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Old 13-11-2012, 07:42 AM
solissydney (Ken)
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Solar images

When one takes images of the Sun early in the morning, or up high, the images are colourless. Late in the day, because of the warm air, the images shows colours.
All with the sun filter in place.
See my image.
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (scan30.jpg)
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