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Old 21-02-2020, 03:15 PM
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gregbradley
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The Rising Milky Way

Taken a while ago. This one is using Sony's pixel shift technology where the camera takes a shot and then shifts the sensor by 1 pixel and takes 4 in total one for each of the RGGB Bayer matrix colours. So you get deeper colour and you get higher resolution.

The main difficulty is using this technology is the filing system. Its hard to tell which photos were taken using Pixel shift and which are just normal exposures. Sony's software is rudimentary.

I use a Pixel shift to DNG software that scans your images file for pixel shift images, then stacks them and saves them as DNG files. Amazing. It does all the hard work and makes it practical otherwise I might not bother.

This 4 pixel shift images (a total of 16 images) of 30 seconds ISO1600 F1.8 Sigma Art 14mm tracked at my dark site.

https://pbase.com/image/170445020/large

Greg.
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Last edited by gregbradley; 22-02-2020 at 08:39 AM.
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Old 22-02-2020, 12:36 PM
Merckx (James)
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Nice image Greg. It must have been a beautiful night - hints of green and red airglow?


Looking at the pbase original seems to be some colour artefacts along the horizon. Is that because of the pixel shift?
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Old 22-02-2020, 03:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Merckx View Post
Nice image Greg. It must have been a beautiful night - hints of green and red airglow?


Looking at the pbase original seems to be some colour artefacts along the horizon. Is that because of the pixel shift?
Thanks. Yes that would be Pixel Shift artefacts from slight tracking movement of the horizon. I missed that. The Sony software corrects for that but the other software I am using does not.

Greg.
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Old 27-02-2020, 06:00 PM
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Thatís a great picture Greg. It shows very clearly that we are looking edge-on into a spiral galaxy with a big central bulge
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Old 28-02-2020, 03:50 PM
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Thatís a great picture Greg. It shows very clearly that we are looking edge-on into a spiral galaxy with a big central bulge
Thanks Geoff.

Yes its very evident. Great at a dark site, its so visual.

Greg.
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Old 25-03-2020, 09:16 PM
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A cool field of view, Greg, it does show the central area very realistically.
Inspiring image.

Last edited by astronobob; 02-04-2020 at 12:55 AM.
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Old 03-04-2020, 09:43 AM
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A cool field of view, Greg, it does show the central area very realistically.
Inspiring image.
Thanks Bob. I do enjoy taking these. It also fills the time as once my large telescope is doing an imaging run I don't have to attend it anymore.

Greg.
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