#1  
Old 21-10-2010, 12:58 AM
ptc (Richard)
Registered User

ptc is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Silicon Valley
Posts: 124
Scientific CMOS Image Sensor Talk from 2008

I gave a talk at the STAR conference in the summer of 2008 regarding the issues needing to be addressed to make a CMOS image sensor suitable for Scientific imaging.

I understand that there is some interest in this topic popping up again so it may be worthwhile to see the perspective on this topic from a person that is working in the industry (me)

it has been and continues to be located in the files section of the CCD tech group on Yahoo:

http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/ccd-imaging-technology/files/CMOS_scientific_sensors/

for those of you that arenít on the group hereís a direct link to it on my website

http://www.narrowbandimaging.com/incoming/cmos.pdf

Thereís been work that has been done in the past two years that I may include in a revision when I can find some time to do so, but it is nonetheless worthwhile to see what I discussed two years ago if so inclined.
Rdc

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 21-10-2010, 08:29 AM
rally
Registered User

rally is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 896
Thanks Richard,

I look forward to the day . . .

I have wondered what has happened to the commercialisation of SiOnyx's Black Silicon CMOS technology - promised the world but still seems after many years to be vapourware ?

You didn't mention the process in your paper for CMOS enhancements, so I wondered was that because your paper was earlier or more the case that the technology was more laboratory hype than commercially realistic ?

Afterall the results they claim are orders (many orders) of magnitude improvement over existing sensors.
That would certanly solve most of our problems !!

Just wondering ?

Cheers

Rally
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 22-10-2010, 09:03 AM
ptc (Richard)
Registered User

ptc is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Silicon Valley
Posts: 124
The fab process is derived from logic processing but the device layer is built on a high resistivity epitaxial layer instead of a highly doped layer

Sionyx has retargeted their technology for solar cells last I heard.

I think they had a huge dark current and non-uniformity problem if i remember correctly




Quote:
Originally Posted by rally View Post
Thanks Richard,

I look forward to the day . . .

I have wondered what has happened to the commercialisation of SiOnyx's Black Silicon CMOS technology - promised the world but still seems after many years to be vapourware ?

You didn't mention the process in your paper for CMOS enhancements, so I wondered was that because your paper was earlier or more the case that the technology was more laboratory hype than commercially realistic ?

Afterall the results they claim are orders (many orders) of magnitude improvement over existing sensors.
That would certanly solve most of our problems !!

Just wondering ?

Cheers

Rally
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 22-10-2010, 08:49 PM
Hagar (Doug)
Registered User

Hagar is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 4,646
You call yourself a man of science then you post old information while openly admitting you should or could have updated it.

Last edited by Hagar; 22-10-2010 at 09:13 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 09:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Astromechanics
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
EQ8-R
Advertisement
Star Adventurer
Advertisement
Celestron RASA
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement