#1  
Old 03-06-2018, 01:57 PM
Slawomir's Avatar
Slawomir (Suavi)
Amateur Photon Collector

Slawomir is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Proserpine
Posts: 3,023
"My" first asteroid

Hi all,

While playing with pixel rejection algorithms I noticed an elongated star that appeared to be moving relative to other stars.

A quick search with Jet Propulsion Lab Small Body Identification Database has allowed me to identify the asteroid - it is 192 Nausikaa (https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=192)

Pretty cool to detect a sub 100km rock floating through space
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (Asteroid.jpg)
212.1 KB78 views
Click for full-size image (Asteroid_2.jpg)
158.7 KB58 views
Click for full-size image (Asteroid_3.jpg)
212.0 KB53 views
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-06-2018, 02:37 PM
Atmos's Avatar
Atmos (Colin)
Ultimate Noob

Atmos is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 6,338
That's pretty cool Suavi! I do really wonder how many asteroids we've all captured and rejected without giving a second thought to!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-06-2018, 02:51 PM
leon's Avatar
leon
Registered User

leon is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: ballarat
Posts: 10,824
Agreed, that is exciting indeed, nice work.

Leon
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-06-2018, 04:49 PM
tlgerdes's Avatar
tlgerdes (Trevor)
Love the moonless nights!

tlgerdes is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Sydney
Posts: 2,280
They tell you it's an asteroid, but really we know that it is little green men in a red tesla convertible.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-06-2018, 06:05 AM
Slawomir's Avatar
Slawomir (Suavi)
Amateur Photon Collector

Slawomir is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Proserpine
Posts: 3,023
Thank you gents. I have also attached an image of the asteroid's orbit.
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (image.jpg)
162.1 KB26 views
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-06-2018, 08:00 AM
glend (Glen)
Registered User

glend is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Lake Macquarie
Posts: 5,348
Good catch Suavi. I had a similar first asteroid experience with the larger Vesta in May. Not using any pixel algorithms, it initially appeared as a registration anomaly between filter layers. All those named small bodies have some sort of orbital motion.
I suppose this is how comets used to be discovered, by folks eye balling film plates.

Last edited by glend; 05-06-2018 at 08:59 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-06-2018, 01:24 PM
sil's Avatar
sil (Steve)
Not even a speck of dust

sil is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Canberra
Posts: 1,402
Pretty awesome to be able to find and identify small chunks of rock out there. Amazing what we can do with fairly modest consumer level tools. Are you going to try to collect more now? Or plan to try to recapture this one later on ?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-06-2018, 02:02 PM
markas (Mark)
Registered User

markas is offline
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Melbourne Australia
Posts: 281
Nice catch!



(Would you believe, last year I got 2 on the one target! One was easily identified as 7 Iris, but the other took a lot of tracking down: it was a 66km wide asteroid with an orbital period of ~87 years......)


Mark
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-06-2018, 05:01 PM
theodog's Avatar
theodog (Jeff)
Every photon is sacred !

theodog is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Coonabarabran
Posts: 1,035
The night Sauvi lost his asteroidal virginity. He will remember it for the rest of his life.

Nice image and follow-up Suavi, well done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sil View Post
Pretty awesome to be able to find and identify small chunks of rock out there. Amazing what we can do with fairly modest consumer level tools. Are you going to try to collect more now? Or plan to try to recapture this one later on ?
Of course he will. Soon it will consume his hobby, leaving little time for those artistic interpretations and sudo-scientific images. This is real data collection, and who knows maybe one day you might save the earth.

Oh, its all to moving.

I'm off to confirm some myself.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-06-2018, 06:29 PM
Slawomir's Avatar
Slawomir (Suavi)
Amateur Photon Collector

Slawomir is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Proserpine
Posts: 3,023
Quote:
Originally Posted by glend View Post
Good catch Suavi. I had a similar first asteroid experience with the larger Vesta in May. Not using any pixel algorithms, it initially appeared as a registration anomaly between filter layers. All those named small bodies have some sort of orbital motion.
I suppose this is how comets used to be discovered, by folks eye balling film plates.
I initially thought it was a bunch of hot pixels...

Quote:
Originally Posted by sil View Post
Pretty awesome to be able to find and identify small chunks of rock out there. Amazing what we can do with fairly modest consumer level tools. Are you going to try to collect more now? Or plan to try to recapture this one later on ?
At this stage I am continuing with my 'pretty picture' of the Lobster nebula, but in the future I will look into chasing some interesting asteroids.

Quote:
Originally Posted by markas View Post
Nice catch!



(Would you believe, last year I got 2 on the one target! One was easily identified as 7 Iris, but the other took a lot of tracking down: it was a 66km wide asteroid with an orbital period of ~87 years......)

Two in one target that's a nice catch for sure

66km is quite small too...

Mark
Quote:
Originally Posted by theodog View Post
The night Sauvi lost his asteroidal virginity. He will remember it for the rest of his life.

Nice image and follow-up Suavi, well done.



Of course he will. Soon it will consume his hobby, leaving little time for those artistic interpretations and sudo-scientific images. This is real data collection, and who knows maybe one day you might save the earth.

Oh, its all to moving.

I'm off to confirm some myself.
It certainly got my attention and planted a seed of curiosity in my brain that will not go away
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-06-2018, 06:42 PM
FlashDrive's Avatar
FlashDrive (Col)
Senior Citizen

FlashDrive is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Brisbane North
Posts: 4,170
Quote:
Originally Posted by markas View Post
it was a 66km wide asteroid with an orbital period of ~87 years......)

Mark
...that's a ' BIG ' Rock ....!!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 10:38 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
SkyWatcher Australia
Advertisement
Meade Australia
Advertisement
Celestron Australia
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement