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Old 30-08-2013, 12:22 PM
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MortonH
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Wildlife video with DSLR & scope?

Wasn't sure whether to post this here or in the equipment forum.

I watched a fascinating documentary the other night where a guy tracked down a pack of wolves in the US wilderness. He had a huge lens with him, possibly 800mm or longer, that was basically a telescope. Once he found the wolves he used the lens/scope with a Canon Digital Rebel to film them.

This made me wonder what kind of video results you might get by simply coupling a DSLR to something like an ED80.

Anyone tried this? Or can you point me in the right direction?

Cheers

Morton
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Old 31-08-2013, 08:46 PM
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astronobob (Bob)
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Hi Morton, I suggest you go out there and give it a try, prolly the best way to find out exactly what will be achived with said scope & dslr ? These guys videoing wildlife have some pretty expensive gear, the price you pay for quailty, some of the rigs/gear you see behind David Attenborough is just insane ?
I have the 600D and am not real familiar with Vid capture yet, though i think this camera wont do 'continuous' focusing in Vid mode, not 100% sure yet as I,ve only used vid a few times ? Though I have done quite a number of terrestrial photo's with the ED80 & ED100 @ 600mm & 900mm respectively on Birds and Surfers, pretty happy with the results, see attached, Surfer taken with ED80 F7.5 !
Only initial hassle was Holding these sized scopes in one hand, operating the shutter etc with the other and then growing a third hand for manual focus of the scope Actually focus was more a guessing game to predict where focus was relitive to when you wanted to shoot, kinda thing.
Another thing is that both my ED's have the little camera piggy adapter on the top of one of the tube rings in which I fit the Camera's Tripod foot and attach the scope up-side-down to the tripod, keeping in mind to move said scope ring to a close ballance point. Scope being upside down also allows one's shutter finger to reach the focus knobs more easierly
Other than that, Someone may know a bit more about Vid capturing ?
Anyway, hope this helps
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Old 04-09-2013, 12:00 PM
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ZeroID (Brent)
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I've used both the 80mm Achro and the 102mm ED LUNT ( Big !! ) on the SONY for some day shots. But obviously you have no autofocus or exposure controls so you are in manual mode for everything. So either presets and pray or find reasonably static subjects. A little chroma on the 80 was noticed, the LUNT was pretty good. But heavy !! Monopod might be the way to go, or tripod with bracket
Must try Bobs 'upside down' idea with the 80, it's got the bits and I can turn the scope inside the rings anyway. Thanks.
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Old 08-09-2013, 08:22 AM
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gregbradley
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I used an ED80 at one point like a telephoto lens and it was great. Its light and I was able to focus fast enough to image flying birds in the distance.

Those guys who spend $15G on their huge Canon and Nikon lenses are really keen. I think you get similar results with an ED80 and some scopes these big lenses can't even match although the weight and lack of autofocus could be a pain.

As far as camera settings goes. I find using autoISO on late model cameras is a good strategy. Then the exposure takes care of itself especially if it has a minimum shutter speed option.

A rig like a Fuji XE1/XM1 or Sony Nex and an ED80 would be very lightweight and easy to handle.

http://www.pbase.com/gregbradley/image/142376966

Done with a Canon 40D and a TEC110 fluorite (a bit heavy for this type of work but a superb lens and check out the creamy bokeh!). I can't see a $15G Can/Nikon matching one of Yuris fluorite triplets (it has about 1/6th the number of lenses for a start!).

Greg.
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Old 08-09-2013, 08:44 AM
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hotspur (Chris)
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Been thinking about that too Morton,my son works in the film and T.V industry,he made outdoor DVD,and might do another,although more general wildlife one.

I was thinking if we knew where red deer hang around in morning-take the Vixen ED81 and put 600D on it and try and get some footage of deer on a hillside they always are seen at.

Be rather tricky,it difficult enough just trying to get images.Those guys in U.S that do that stuff,must have some amazingly good gear,and spend LOTS of time in field.
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