Go Back   IceInSpace > General Astronomy > Astronomy and Amateur Science

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 26-04-2019, 01:03 PM
gary
Registered User

gary is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Mt. Kuring-Gai
Posts: 5,170
Hubble Space Telescope measurements of Hubble Constant reinforce new physics theory

NASA have announced today that in a new study, the Hubble Space Telescope
was used to refine the cosmic distance ladder by making more precise
measurements of the distance to 70 Cepheid variables in the LMC.

However, the results are still at odds with the measurements made by
the Planck Space observatory of the cosmic microwave background
and the expected value of the early universe's expansion.

Cosmologists refer to this growing discrepancy in various ways of
measuring the Hubble constant as the "Hubble tension".

Quote:
Originally Posted by NASA
These most precise Hubble measurements to date bolster the idea that new physics may be needed to explain the mismatch.

"The Hubble tension between the early and late universe may be the most exciting development in cosmology in decades," said lead researcher and Nobel laureate Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) and Johns Hopkins University, in Baltimore, Maryland. "This mismatch has been growing and has now reached a point that is really impossible to dismiss as a fluke. This disparity could not plausibly occur just by chance."
Quote:
Originally Posted by NASA
"This is not just two experiments disagreeing," Riess explained. "We are measuring something fundamentally different. One is a measurement of how fast the universe is expanding today, as we see it. The other is a prediction based on the physics of the early universe and on measurements of how fast it ought to be expanding. If these values don't agree, there becomes a very strong likelihood that we're missing something in the cosmological model that connects the two eras."
Quote:
Originally Posted by NASA
So, what could explain this discrepancy?

One explanation for the mismatch involves an unexpected appearance of dark energy in the young universe, which is thought to now comprise 70% of the universe's contents. Proposed by astronomers at Johns Hopkins, the theory is dubbed "early dark energy," and suggests that the universe evolved like a three-act play.

...

Yet another attractive possibility is that dark matter (an invisible form of matter not made up of protons, neutrons, and electrons) interacts more strongly with normal matter or radiation than previously assumed.

But the true explanation is still a mystery.
Press release here :-
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard...ew-hubble-data
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 01:59 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
SkyWatcher Australia
Advertisement
Meade Australia
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
Celestron Australia
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement