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  #21  
Old 10-02-2019, 11:02 AM
Pepper (Steve)
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from last night
I really don't know what this object is? I wandered around till I found this.
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  #22  
Old 10-02-2019, 12:44 PM
raymo
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Its a hugely under exposed image of the Homunculus Nebula which is
embedded in the Eta Carina Nebula. Here's an image I took years ago.
raymo
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  #23  
Old 10-02-2019, 05:19 PM
Pepper (Steve)
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That’s a beaut raymo. Really shows the miles and miles I have to go before I’m gonna get something that good!
ues I realise it’s under exposed to the max, it’s just getting the time to figure out what the f I’m doing. there are some things I’m still trying to wrap my poor feeble brain around. Gotta get using sharp cap down first then try guiding and longer exposures when I’m a bit more knowing. If I can’t make it second nature to do the first steps, there is no point moving onto the next step.
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  #24  
Old 10-02-2019, 09:35 PM
raymo
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The last sentence is the most important in your post. Get a foolproof basic
imaging routine up and running before moving on. For various reasons most imagers start off with a DSLR, and some, who are not after perfection, stay
with one.
In your case, get your polar alignment routine second nature, same goes for whatever method you are using for focusing. With your ED100 you should
be able to routinely get round stars using subs of around 40-60 secs, and
sometimes longer. Forget guiding until you master the basics, especially,
and most importantly, basic processing, which is as important as gathering good data in the first place.
Incidentally, my image is a JPEG taken with an 8" Newt, 10 X 30secs
unguided using a DSLR; close to as basic as it gets.
raymo
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  #25  
Old 10-02-2019, 10:41 PM
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Ukastronomer (Jeremy)
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You are getting there

Get a T2 mount and attach a DSLR
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  #26  
Old 14-03-2019, 07:17 AM
infomorph (Sean)
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G'day Steve, great thread!

I'm just about to splurge out on a scope and mount myself, and am also keen to have a crack at astrophotography. I'm blown away by the shots you're getting as a beginner. Inspiration to dive in and give it a crack!
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  #27  
Old 16-03-2019, 07:49 AM
Pepper (Steve)
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Thanks Sean. I’m pleased my meagre offerings provide some inspiration.
I’d like to have updated this thread but I’ve been so busy with moving house and 12hr days lately.
And now I got a couple of days spare it looks like we may finally be getting some rain out here.
Fingers crossed it will be a clear night for the worm moon.
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  #28  
Old 21-03-2019, 02:33 PM
tvandoore (Tim)
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The best thing I ever did was to put one full setup together, zip tie a powerboard and all the adapters etc to the mount legs, and get some caster wheels so I could wheel it in and out while all set up. I have a set position marked on my deck for each tripod leg so I can get it close to a polar alignment (which is then quickly nailed down in sharpcap). This reduced my setup time from, say, 45 mins to 5 mins. It let me just wheel it out when things looked OK, and in doing so I then used my rig consistently every other night for a few weeks. In those few weeks I learnt more than I had since I started a few years ago. Now I know it all works, so just have to wait for the moon to go away again.

It isn't that inspiring to think "I'm going to spend 1.5 hours in set up and pack up time, just to get my autofocus working", but if you're straight to working on your next issue within 10 minutes it gets a lot more tolerable (ie no three month breaks from the hobby because you spent night after night trying to get the one issue resolved).

I'll see if I can take some pictures so you can see what I mean.
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