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Old 18-12-2010, 06:55 AM
bloodhound31
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5D Panoramic crop recommendation

At the native resolution of the full-frame of a 5D MK II, can anyone tell me the best crop/aspect ratio for a typical pano?

If there is a best one, why?

Are there standard frames and mats for such an aspect ratio?

It's good to know answers, but even better to find out the reasons for them.

*as always, please keep your explanations free from professor-talk.

Cheers,

Baz.
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Old 18-12-2010, 07:54 PM
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troypiggo (Troy)
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Depends on the scene. Just keeping shooting and stitching until you can't shoot or stitch no more.

Most important thing I reckon is to make sure the frames overlap by enough (I try to get 1/3 to 1/2 of each shot overlapping) for the stitch to work. And make sure the end frames extend beyond where you actually want the shot to end.
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Old 18-12-2010, 11:19 PM
bloodhound31
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Thanks Troy. I think I will have to make a bar for my camera to attach to my ball-head further rearward so the objective lens becomes the pivot point.

Baz.
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Old 19-12-2010, 06:15 AM
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You raise an interesting question.

I do a lot of panoramic photography, I believe the most succesful ratios for a pano are between 2:1 and 4:1. With 2:1, 2.5:1 and 3:1 being very popular.

Longer formats tend to create the impression of a tiny ribbon of color without any detail. Shoter formats look like regular photos.

If you take a look at the 2010 Epson Pano Awards winners you'll see most succesful panos are between 2:1 and 4:1 ratios.

Luis
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Old 19-12-2010, 07:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luigi View Post
I do a lot of panoramic photography, I believe the most succesful ratios for a pano are between 2:1 and 4:1. With 2:1, 2.5:1 and 3:1 being very popular.

Longer formats tend to create the impression of a tiny ribbon of color without any detail. Shoter formats look like regular photos.

If you take a look at the 2010 Epson Pano Awards winners you'll see most succesful panos are between 2:1 and 4:1 ratios.
Aah, reading your response and re-reading Baz's original question, I see your response is probably more what he was after. I was taking "standard" as literal, but what's more important is what is most appealing. Totally agree with your comments about too long and too short especially. Although I do have a 19 shot panorama that is one of my personal favourites.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodhound31 View Post
Thanks Troy. I think I will have to make a bar for my camera to attach to my ball-head further rearward so the objective lens becomes the pivot point.
Making/buying pano-heads was pretty much the only way to do things once upon a time. But these days with digital development and the software available being so advanced, I don't know that pano-heads are a necessity any more. The software does a very capable job of stitching seemlessly - as long as the shots overlap "enough" as I mentioned above.
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Old 19-12-2010, 10:16 AM
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Maybe my previous panos didn't have enough overlap then. I was sure I had overlapped them plenty, but I still have to do a lot of smudge and clone clean-up afterwards. Looks like junk and I don't post it.

Baz.
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Old 19-12-2010, 10:17 AM
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Thanks Luis, that's exactly what I was after.

Baz.
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Old 20-12-2010, 02:59 PM
Benny L (Ben)
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Hi Baz,

If you have a look at the panoramic camera offerings from Linhof/Horseman etc the most popular aspect ratio for a panorama is 2:1 and roughly 3:1 which corresponds to their 6x12cm and 6x17cm 120 film cameras. Fotoman used to make a 6x24? which is a ratio of 4:1. But i find this to be 'too long' i generally stick to about 3:1

Ben
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Old 20-12-2010, 03:29 PM
bloodhound31
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Okay, that's all great info blokes, and something for me to work with. But what about the third part of my question, are there standard frames and mats for such as these?

Baz.
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Old 20-12-2010, 07:52 PM
Benny L (Ben)
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probably not.. but what you could do is get one of those frames that hold 3-4 'normal' prints in a row and either get someone to cut the matt to suit or you can DIY you can get matt cutters from Jackson's Drawing Supplies if you want to give it a crack
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Old 20-12-2010, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Benny L View Post
probably not.. but what you could do is get one of those frames that hold 3-4 'normal' prints in a row and either get someone to cut the matt to suit or you can DIY you can get matt cutters from Jackson's Drawing Supplies if you want to give it a crack
Wow. I was really expecting there would be an industry standard and some clean-cut answers to all of this.

Obviously there is no standard and I can do what I like, but obviously this means custom designed stuff is going to be more expensive.
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Old 22-12-2010, 10:30 PM
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Thanks Troy. I think I will have to make a bar for my camera to attach to my ball-head further rearward so the objective lens becomes the pivot point.
As long as you have enough light to shoot hand held given the focal length of your lens, and are able to pan smoothly, you can do panos without a tripod. I wouldn't try it beyond about 70mm. Any good stitching software can cope with uneven edges. Unless your target is extremely close there's no need to worry about the pivot point on a tripod. It would be simpler to take more frames and have more overlap.

Try not to use wide angle lenses. Unless you have something like AutoPano Pro which can do field flattening to remove distortion, the images will not stitch well.

I adhere to the 1/3 overlap method. You can shoot in portrait if that gives you enough height for the width. If I want something squarer, I'll shoot two passes with both horizontal and vertical overlaps.

I have a few images with aspect like 10:1 (that is 25114x2348), 9:2, 17:4, 3:1 because that suited the target.

As for mounting, you will probably find you'll need to crop and scale to fit standard frames and matts. Or if that would destroy the composition, get them made for you, or get the gear and make your own.
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