ICEINSPACE
Most Read Articles
Moon Phase
CURRENT MOON Waxing Crescent
12.9%
The Sun Now
Time Zones
Sydney*
12:34 pm
Perth
9:34 am
Auckland*
2:34 pm
New York
8:34 pm
Paris
2:34 am
GMT
1:34 am




Go Back   IceInSpace > Beginners Start Here > Beginners Equipment Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 07-10-2013, 08:13 PM
phobos27's Avatar
phobos27 (Nick)
Registered User

phobos27 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 77
Best Telscope with Goto for under $4000

I am looking at buying my second telescope and am wondering what would be best for under $4000. I currently have the Astromaster 130-EQ but does not have the desired aperture (130mm). I am also into astrophotography and need a tracking mount so i can get clear long exposure rather then using a zoom lense on a tripod . It would also be good if my telescope could find the objects i am looking at because that is a huge pain at the moment. Zoom is not a big deal for me as long as i can see the planets clearly. I know I'm asking for a lot but it is better to ask around then make a bad purchase.

(Edited) Refractors look the best for astrophotography but are there any better scopes and why are refractors so good for it?

Thanks!

Last edited by phobos27; 17-10-2013 at 07:23 PM. Reason: Revised my budget and reason!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-10-2013, 09:41 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 4,477
If you are talking new gear rather than used, there are several ways you can go,
depending on how important extra aperture is to you, and how important
astro imaging is, because all scopes are compromises.
You are obviously used to using a Newtonian, and know that the
eyepiece can get into some inconvenient positions. If you are happy
with a Newt, I suggest the Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro GOTO and the 8" f/5[200mm]
Newt that are often sold as a package around $1700-1800.
To get more aperture with GOTO capability, but not so versatile
photographically, you could get a Skywatcher 10"[250mm] GOTO
collapsible Dobsonian.[otherwise known as a Flexdob].You would
have some change left over for any desired accessories.
For high quality planetary work you could get a 6"[150mm]
Maksutov, on the aforementioned HEQ5 mount for around $2000,
but it is rather slow photographically.
Finally, you could get a small APO refractor on a GOTO mount
which would give first class imaging results, but not so good
for fainter objects visually because of it's small aperture.
As I said, all scopes are a compromise. Your choice; I hope
this helped.
raymo
P.S. I have no connection whatever with Skywatcher.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-10-2013, 10:08 PM
phobos27's Avatar
phobos27 (Nick)
Registered User

phobos27 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by raymo View Post
If you are talking new gear rather than used, there are several ways you can go,
depending on how important extra aperture is to you, and how important
astro imaging is, because all scopes are compromises.
You are obviously used to using a Newtonian, and know that the
eyepiece can get into some inconvenient positions. If you are happy
with a Newt, I suggest the Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro GOTO and the 8" f/5[200mm]
Newt that are often sold as a package around $1700-1800.
To get more aperture with GOTO capability, but not so versatile
photographically, you could get a Skywatcher 10"[250mm] GOTO
collapsible Dobsonian.[otherwise known as a Flexdob].You would
have some change left over for any desired accessories.
For high quality planetary work you could get a 6"[150mm]
Maksutov, on the aforementioned HEQ5 mount for around $2000,
but it is rather slow photographically.
Finally, you could get a small APO refractor on a GOTO mount
which would give first class imaging results, but not so good
for fainter objects visually because of it's small aperture.
As I said, all scopes are a compromise. Your choice; I hope
this helped.
raymo
P.S. I have no connection whatever with Skywatcher.
Thanks that is a big help. They all look good but will have to figure out what is best for my interests. The Skywatcher Explorer 200P HEQ5 PRO looks like the best all rounder. Might head out and try a few of these at some viewing nights. Thanks for all the suggestions!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-10-2013, 05:08 AM
mental4astro's Avatar
mental4astro (Alexander)
kids+wife+scopes=happyman

mental4astro is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: sydney, australia
Posts: 4,221
Go-to isn't the only option. 'Push-to' is another. Here instead of having little motors move your scope, you do the work, following a simple countdown timer as you zero in on the target. Both go-to & push-to systems need to be aligned, so there is no advantage or disadvantage there. Even a GPS system needs alignment refinement. What a go-to will that a push-to won't is track (unless your mount already has a tracking system). But a push-to will begin to 'count-up' the misalignment in the same way it did the countdown, so if the target moves out of the field of view requiring it is a simple matter.

What push-to systems have over go-to is usually a larger catalogue of objects, and depending on the system, can learn the little quibbles of a mount & take them into the calculations for its accuracy. These systems are also easy to retrofit to an existing mount too, from equatorial to simple alt-az & dob mounts

Reason I mention these push-to systems is they then give you a wider scope selection. It could mean ending up with a scope that is of better quality, or simpler to setup & takedown, or even a larger aperture, particularly from the secondhand market as a push-to system can usually be easily retro fitted. In the classifieds at the moment there is a 12" dob with an Argo Navis push-to system (I reckon the most powerful push-to there is, & Aussie made!) for $1200.

Argo Navis is also capable of being coupled to a set of retro fitted servo motors to also give you a go-to scope. Many large dob owners go this way too. I've put encoders onto my 17.5" dob & my 8" dob, & I can swap an Agro Navis between each mount, no problem. One CPU, two mounts

There are other push-to systems available too.

Something more to consider.

Mental.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-10-2013, 03:52 PM
phobos27's Avatar
phobos27 (Nick)
Registered User

phobos27 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by mental4astro View Post
Go-to isn't the only option. 'Push-to' is another. Here instead of having little motors move your scope, you do the work, following a simple countdown timer as you zero in on the target. Both go-to & push-to systems need to be aligned, so there is no advantage or disadvantage there. Even a GPS system needs alignment refinement. What a go-to will that a push-to won't is track (unless your mount already has a tracking system). But a push-to will begin to 'count-up' the misalignment in the same way it did the countdown, so if the target moves out of the field of view requiring it is a simple matter.

What push-to systems have over go-to is usually a larger catalogue of objects, and depending on the system, can learn the little quibbles of a mount & take them into the calculations for its accuracy. These systems are also easy to retrofit to an existing mount too, from equatorial to simple alt-az & dob mounts

Reason I mention these push-to systems is they then give you a wider scope selection. It could mean ending up with a scope that is of better quality, or simpler to setup & takedown, or even a larger aperture, particularly from the secondhand market as a push-to system can usually be easily retro fitted. In the classifieds at the moment there is a 12" dob with an Argo Navis push-to system (I reckon the most powerful push-to there is, & Aussie made!) for $1200.

Argo Navis is also capable of being coupled to a set of retro fitted servo motors to also give you a go-to scope. Many large dob owners go this way too. I've put encoders onto my 17.5" dob & my 8" dob, & I can swap an Agro Navis between each mount, no problem. One CPU, two mounts

There are other push-to systems available too.

Something more to consider.

Mental.
Thanks for the advice. A Goto would be better as it would allow me too smoothly take the picture for a long exposure. I will look into this though!

Phobos
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-10-2013, 04:45 PM
MattT's Avatar
MattT (Matthew)
Reflecting on Refracting

MattT is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 1,193
Under $2K get it all off the classifieds. An NEQ6 and a 200mm f5 Newt should be easy to get just takes time.
Matt
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 17-10-2013, 12:15 PM
Poita (Peter)
Registered User

Poita is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: NSW Country
Posts: 3,583
What do you mainly want to see? If it is planets then I would look for a C8 or longer scope, if is is deep sky objects, then a big fat dobsonian.

If photography, then for that budget an EQ6 and ED80 2nd hand and a 2nd hand camera like a QHY8.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 17-10-2013, 07:20 PM
phobos27's Avatar
phobos27 (Nick)
Registered User

phobos27 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 77
I have been looking at all your great suggestions and recently went out and checked out some telescopes and am happy to raise my budget a bit to $3500-$4000.
I would like to do astrophotography of deep sky objects (I have a Nikon D-7100). DSO's would be the thing i would like to photograph. The EQ6 with the ED120 looks good but i can't find anything else bigger than that for refractors... Do they come any bigger or would that be just fine? Also is that too big for the mount with the camera?

Thanks for any suggestions, much appreciated!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 17-10-2013, 10:24 PM
jjjnettie's Avatar
jjjnettie (Jeanette)
Registered User

jjjnettie is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Far Far Away
Posts: 16,725
Your local astro society should have rent-a-scopes so you can test drive different gear and see what suits you best.
Best to know exactly what you're getting before you lay out the big bikkies.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 18-10-2013, 06:51 AM
phobos27's Avatar
phobos27 (Nick)
Registered User

phobos27 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by jjjnettie View Post
Your local astro society should have rent-a-scopes so you can test drive different gear and see what suits you best.
Best to know exactly what you're getting before you lay out the big bikkies.
Yeah , thanks for that suggestion. I'll look into it. Might be a good idea.
Hopefully they have some scopes i'm looking at.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 18-10-2013, 09:47 AM
Camelopardalis's Avatar
Camelopardalis (Dunk)
Drifting from the pole

Camelopardalis is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 4,350
If you're going to get an EQ6 I'd suggest getting a small (80mm or so) apo refractor for imaging and a larger newt/Dob/SCT for visual. Depending on your interests of course, but you wouldn't necessarily have to get this all at once
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 25-10-2013, 08:55 PM
Nico13's Avatar
Nico13 (Ken)
Galaxy Hunting

Nico13 is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Geelong region.
Posts: 941
Hi Nick,
Lots of good advice here but there is a bit being left out given that what you want to do is deep space imaging.
The other things to consider for long exposure are guiding, the type of guider you choose will dictate to some extent how long the exposures you can do.
While you can happily setup an EQ5 or NEQ6 pro goto mount with a reasonably fast newt or largish refractor and start imaging deep space you will find that very soon you will be wanting more accuracy to correct those little drift errors that are giving you egg shaped or elongated stars.
Having said that I operate on a similar budget to you by the sound of it I also have an NEQ6 Pro mount.
Now you'll be wanting to guide the whole shebang to help you get nice round stars so depending on the main scope you choose will determine what guiding you use.
Options for this and a common one is to use a second small scope like an Orion short tube 80mm with a suitable guide camera.
(check out Bintel link on the side of this page to give you an idea of cost there)
If you wind up with a Newt or a SCT type scope you can go for an "on axis" or "off axis" or for that matter the ST80 option as above.
There are lots of combinations of camera's, scopes, guide scopes and cameras for them.
Given that you will be using your SLR to image with possibly your best bet will be the second scope for guiding like the ST80 guider.
NEQ6 Pro is a great well proven mount.
For deep space a scope with a focal length of 1500mm or longer is good and with your SLR will give you a field of good size for deep space.
An example is a GSO RC8 with 1624mm focal length and SLR with APS C size sensor will give you a field size of approx 50 x 30 arc minutes.
Translated to something more recognizable you will fit a full moon in nicely with a bit to spare and so with solar filter the sun as well the same.
Deep space you will get something like the lovely big Galaxy of NGC253 in almost a full frame picture.
So for around the $3500 you can get the NEQ6 pro mount a GSO RC8 f8 and an Orion ST80 guider package and that will give you a bloody good start with the need for little else.
A great wide field imager scope is the Skywatcher ED80 and that is good for large Nebula like Carina and or the great Orion Nebula for example and it's also very good for doing Galaxy clusters.
Wether you pick this sort of gear up new or second hand well that's up to you how long you want to wait for second hand stuff to come up for sale but even at new prices they are quite reasonable at the moment.
Bintel or Andrews are good suppliers for new.
I hope this helps with your choices.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 29-10-2013, 06:26 PM
brian nordstrom's Avatar
brian nordstrom (As avatar)
Registered User

brian nordstrom is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Perth WA
Posts: 4,231
If it was my 4k it would be a 127mm NG triplet on an Ioptron IEQ45 goto mount , sweet combo that will give for years .
Brian..
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 30-10-2013, 09:14 AM
leosoul (Amit)
Registered User

leosoul is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Sydney
Posts: 5
HEQ5 Pro Goto with Skywatcher 8 inch

I got HEQ5 Pro Goto with Skywatch Newt 8inch and its a very good telescope. Only downside is that it takes me sometime to take it from my 7th floor Apartment to my car (even using lifts). Otherwise telescope is very good built quality. Costs around $1500 - 1600 in total.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 30-10-2013, 11:04 AM
rustigsmed's Avatar
rustigsmed (Russell)
Registered User

rustigsmed is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Mornington Peninsula, Australia
Posts: 3,137
NEQ6 $1800
8" Newt $450
Moonlite Focuser with Electronic hi res motor stepper & controller ($210$190+$250)
Lodestar guide camera $725.
MPCC $279
Off axis guider $230.

Total: $4134
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 13-11-2013, 08:21 PM
mkeech (Mark)
Registered User

mkeech is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Perth
Posts: 5
does anyone know of a downside to the Nexstar 6se

Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 17-11-2013, 10:28 PM
sn1987a's Avatar
sn1987a (Barry)
Registered User

sn1987a is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Rockingham WA Australia
Posts: 644
How about a 16 Lightbridge($2200), Servocat junior $1500-1800)and Nexus ($250)?
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 22-11-2013, 10:16 AM
impactcrater11
Registered User

impactcrater11 is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: SYDNEY
Posts: 7
hi phobos27
4 thousand buys a lot of scope....and that brings the problem of size and weight. some of these bigger kits will weigh over 50 kg. the benefit of bigger apertures over 8 inches is not that magical and even 6 inches produces very delightful views....I doubt I would spend over 2 and a half thousand and spend the extra luccky you dollars on accessories...
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
astrophotography, goto, telescope, tracker

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 11:34 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
Atik Horizon
Advertisement
FLI Cameras and Imaging Accessories
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
SkyWatcher WiFi Adaptor
Advertisement
Interest Free Finance
Advertisement
SkyWatcher 2018 Catalogue
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement