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Old 31-08-2019, 06:20 PM
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FlashDrive (Col)
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What Filter ......

I find Jupiter very bright at times ....what filter is best used to ' bring out ' the Bands ... ??

Col..
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Old 31-08-2019, 06:27 PM
Ukastronomer (Jeremy)
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https://agenaastro.com/choosing-a-co...ry-filter.html
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Old 31-08-2019, 06:28 PM
Ukastronomer (Jeremy)
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The Blue Filter is one of the most commonly used filters amongst the entire spectrum of filters. It is perhaps the best filter for the study of detail on Jupiter and Saturn. It enhances the contrast of rills and festoons in Jupiter's cloud belts, as well as details of the Great Red Spot

Article copyright Agena AstroProducts, 2008.
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Old 31-08-2019, 06:33 PM
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FlashDrive (Col)
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Thanks Jeremy ...
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Old 01-09-2019, 02:20 PM
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I've heard a lot of planetary observers use the Baader Moon and Sky Glow filter. I'm pretty sure that's it anyway.
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Old 01-09-2019, 05:22 PM
Rainmaker (Matt)
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I've heard a lot of planetary observers use the Baader Moon and Sky Glow filter. I'm pretty sure that's it anyway.
The Baader M&SG is great for bringing out colour and detail in the Jovian clouds. If the seeing doesn't support higher magnification to reduce the exit pupil then a light neutral density helps...
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:03 PM
ausastronomer (John Bambury)
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If you already own a broadband or light pollution filter just use that as your planetary filter. That's a trick not many people are aware of.

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John B
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:07 AM
sharpiel (Les)
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Thank you so much join. I wasn't aware of that...
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Old 07-09-2019, 06:39 PM
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The Baader M&SG is great for bringing out colour and detail in the Jovian clouds. If the seeing doesn't support higher magnification to reduce the exit pupil then a light neutral density helps...
For once adding MSG is a good thing.
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Old 07-09-2019, 07:15 PM
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Astronomik CLS another ; use it ahead of my Blue 80 A..Great for cutting out light pollution problems when doing AP too.
Bigjoe
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Old 07-09-2019, 07:24 PM
ausastronomer (John Bambury)
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Astronomik CLS another ; use it ahead of my Blue 80 A..Great for cutting out light pollution problems when doing AP too.
Bigjoe
Hi Joe,

Yes that's a "BroadBand" Light Pollution Filter. It doesn't need to be that one specifically, they all work very well as "Planetary Filters", notwithstanding they might not work as well as each other for their designed light pollution reduction purpose.

These work well as "Planetary Filters" because they reduce "Irradiation" which is the distortion of the Boundaries between light and darker features and they soften the tones of similar adjacent colours. Both of which helps to improve the "signal to noise ratio"

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John B
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Old 08-09-2019, 11:11 AM
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Hi Joe,

Yes that's a "BroadBand" Light Pollution Filter. It doesn't need to be that one specifically, they all work very well as "Planetary Filters", notwithstanding they might not work as well as each other for their designed light pollution reduction purpose.

These work well as "Planetary Filters" because they reduce "Irradiation" which is the distortion of the Boundaries between light and darker features and they soften the tones of similar adjacent colours. Both of which helps to improve the "signal to noise ratio"

Cheers,
John B
Yes John "IRRADIATION" is a problem most never recognize!

Cheers Bigjoe.
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Old 08-09-2019, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by ausastronomer View Post
Hi Joe,

Yes that's a "BroadBand" Light Pollution Filter. It doesn't need to be that one specifically, they all work very well as "Planetary Filters", notwithstanding they might not work as well as each other for their designed light pollution reduction purpose.

These work well as "Planetary Filters" because they reduce "Irradiation" which is the distortion of the Boundaries between light and darker features and they soften the tones of similar adjacent colours. Both of which helps to improve the "signal to noise ratio"

Cheers,
John B
Yes indeed John.. "IRRADIATION" is a problem most never recognize!

Cheers Bigjoe.
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Old 13-09-2019, 04:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashDrive View Post
I find Jupiter very bright at times ....what filter is best used to ' bring out ' the Bands ... ??

Col..
Blue #80A will do it and reduce the brightness.
If you prefer a more natural color, try:
--Baader Moon & Sky Glow filter
--Neutral density #50
Both of those cut the brightness a tad without a color shift.
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