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  #21  
Old 09-10-2009, 02:04 PM
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renormalised (Carl)
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Originally Posted by ozskywatcher View Post
Hi all,

I am after advice for what camera to use with a (new)! Meade LX200ACF 10" tube assembly on at Skywatcher NEQ6 Pro mount. It will be coming with a f6.3 focal reducer.

My plan is to get into asteroid observing / hunting (I am aware of the small field of view issue) and I want to start collecting information on what camera to purchase. I will be using a Canon 1000D SLR as a starting point. I am assuming that it won't be suitable for 'proper' data collection and so I would need to get a 'proper' CCD camera.

I would appreciate advice on a first CCD camera. Ideally something not more than $2,000.

Many thanks,

Paul Floyd.
Try one of these...GStar-EX
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  #22  
Old 09-10-2009, 09:52 PM
ozskywatcher (Paul)
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Like the 'video' mode

Thanks for the link.

That looks like one to file away for next year when I have the money saved up.

Regards,

Paul Floyd.


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Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
Cooled, mono with a Sony HAD chip this unit is sensitive, bordeline budgetwise and the chipis small (you will need to use the FR) but the AUD rate at the moment might just put this in your range:

http://www.opticstar.com/Run/Astrono...=0_10_0_50_210

If not there are lesser models available...
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  #23  
Old 09-10-2009, 09:54 PM
ozskywatcher (Paul)
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Re. the GStar-EX

I am aware of the GX.

The thing that turns me off it as an option is the fact that you would need to do extra processing before you could process the image before you could prepare positioning reports.

Unless that has been changed in the software?

Regards,

Paul Floyd.




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Try one of these...GStar-EX
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  #24  
Old 10-10-2009, 10:08 AM
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If you don't want to take pretty pictures and you want to take shots of asteroids you should probably ask the planetary imaging guys which camera.

DMK make several mono models.

So does Point Grey Research.

Lumunera are a leading brand. They make several models. $2000 would get you close to top of the line on all the above.

The Sony ICX285 chip is the best. The new Kodak A340 is also very good.

Perhaps the approach to imaging an asteroid is similar to imaging a planet where its F40 (you need a 4X powermate) and 30 frames per second ability and stack lots of images using K3CCD tools or other stacking software used in planetary imaging.

Asteroids won't show up as colour so a colour cam would be a waste and colour cams are always quite a bit less sensitive than mono cameras because of their design.

Greg.
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  #25  
Old 10-10-2009, 10:52 AM
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I think the purpose of imaging asteroids is not to take colour images of the brightest asteroids but to detect very faint asteroids that haven't been found before. This requires a very sensitive camera and lots of light gathering ability ie a big scope.
A video type camera would be a poor contender for this as they are not able to take long enough exposures.
I mono CCD is really the best option.
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  #26  
Old 10-10-2009, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ozskywatcher View Post
I am aware of the GX.

The thing that turns me off it as an option is the fact that you would need to do extra processing before you could process the image before you could prepare positioning reports.

Unless that has been changed in the software?

Regards,

Paul Floyd.
That's something you're going to have to do (extra processing) no matter what camera you use.
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  #27  
Old 11-10-2009, 06:25 PM
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I agree with TerryB, try and find something like a ST9. If your interested in astrometry this would be a good start.

You can easily run your reducer at f5 and maximise your field of view for asteroid searching. I'm not sure how sucessful you would be as you need to aim for mag 19 and to do this with a 10" scope problably requires at least 1 minute exposures. When you take into account that you need to then take 3 images of the same part of sky in one night to reduce false alarms you are not going to be able search much sky (30 square degrees per night). But you never know!

Terry
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  #28  
Old 16-10-2009, 09:44 PM
ozskywatcher (Paul)
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Keep the opinions / information coming...

Thanks everybody for the thoughts / information etc.

I am realistic about my chances of finding my own asteroid (particularly with the automated surveys that seem to keep setting up). It is something that I have always wanted to try and I am know in the position to do so.... I just have to learn how to do it (first through a DSLR then eventually a CCD camera).

Regards,

Paul Floyd.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CometGuy View Post
I agree with TerryB, try and find something like a ST9. If your interested in astrometry this would be a good start.

You can easily run your reducer at f5 and maximise your field of view for asteroid searching. I'm not sure how sucessful you would be as you need to aim for mag 19 and to do this with a 10" scope problably requires at least 1 minute exposures. When you take into account that you need to then take 3 images of the same part of sky in one night to reduce false alarms you are not going to be able search much sky (30 square degrees per night). But you never know!

Terry
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