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Old 09-08-2013, 02:23 PM
Star Hunter
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Ons Shot Colour cameras: Are they any good?

What does the group think of these, one-shot-colour CCD cameras?

Are they worth the expense?

Has anyone had experience with the SXVR M25C camera?

Do these cameras beat a Canon 60Da for image quality and colour? and how does one convert a mono image into colour, with these cameras anyway?

Hopefully someone will chime in here and answer this posting.

ciao,

James
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Old 09-08-2013, 03:15 PM
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rustigsmed (Russell)
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hey james,

not sure about the SX camera, something to consider is perhaps the CDS-600d http://www.centralds.net/cam/?p=1687 , you can pick up a 600d body pretty cheap on Kogan $469 http://www.kogan.com/au/buy/canon-eos-600d-body/, and get it modified at CDS for about $1100 i think http://www.centralds.net/cam/?page_id=5308 which would equal near abouts the price of a 60da.


cheers

rusty
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Old 09-08-2013, 03:52 PM
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LewisM
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I have an SXVR-M25C. A BRILLIANT camera, and I do not need to take darks at ALL! VERY VERY low noise from the chip.

Colour rendition is very good. Detail superb. Cooling is not ultra cool, but lately I have been easily 30 below ambient. If you add the optional external fan, I think it'll drop a few more (the camera housing gets warm).

Downside - really can't do NB with them.

THOROUGHLY recommend it. I have both OSC and LRGB setups, and the OSC is great if you just don't want to fiddle aroundand get images out fast.
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Old 09-08-2013, 05:04 PM
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tlgerdes (Trevor)
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I feel the key differences compared to normal DSLR are

1) Cooling, most OSC cameras nowadays are peltier cooled, this drastically minimizes electrical noise in your image.
2) Spectrum, they have an imaging capture enhanced spectrum that extends in the wavelengths beyond the human eyes sensitvity. This spectrum is normally filtered out in a DSLR.
3) A/D conversion, this one is subject to manufacturers designs, but most common OSC cameras have a 16bit capture resolution, where as say a 600D is 14bit image resolution. This is the number of gradients for each coloured pixel. This can make a significant difference once you start processing the captured image.
4) Purpose design circuitry for low noise.

The first 2 of these can be dealt with in a DSLR, but as has been pointed out it adds cost, the last 2 are sometimes dealt with by buying a more expensive DSLR.

BTW I have a QHY10 OSC
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Old 09-08-2013, 06:34 PM
johnnyt123 (John)
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My experience with the one shot colour camera is limited to the use of the Orion starshoot deep sky colour imager pro 2.

It still serves me well but I have recently decided to move to mono imaging with LRGB and narrow band filters.

I live in Sydney and light pollution is a problem.

The disadvantage with one shot colour is that they are not as sensitive as mono cameras due to the Bayer matrix overlying the CCD chip. This means you need longer exposure times which will result in a lot of light pollution affecting your final image.
Narrow band imaging eliminated light pollution and I believe you can only do this with mono Chip imagers.

One shot colour cameras perform well with fast optical systems.
The Orion imager I have isn't very sensitive at f10 but is reasonable at f6.3 and below.

If you want to use hyperstar then one shot colour is a better option as it eliminates the need for a filter wheel that will obstruct your scope's aperture.
For low f ratio you may want to consider the SXVR-H814c http://www.sxccd.com/trius-h814c
For high f ratio the SXVR-M25c with the larger pixel size is a good option.

Hope that helps.

John
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Old 10-08-2013, 08:12 AM
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alpal
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Hi James,
OSC can be OK but the results are not as good as a mono.

You end up paying twice when you finally buy a mono anyway.
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