#1501  
Old 21-08-2013, 11:57 PM
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wihgtr
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Anyone know a good site (besides this one) that gives a very simplistic guide to which telescopes are for what and weather restrictions etc? Does country matter? SO many "clouds" here
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  #1502  
Old 22-08-2013, 05:26 PM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
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Telescopes are like many things, there is no perfecy scope to cover all eventualities.
To a large extent the type of scope that suits is determined a combination of factors. Some can be
- what objects are being observed
- is visual use or imaging the main task
- budget
- storage space
- permanent setup or portable
- is it being installed in a observatory
- if portable, how portable and how is it to be transported
- are there existing accessories that it needs to match

That is all I can think of at the moment. Once these questions are considered, you can narrow down the choices a bit. There is an article on this site that discusses some of these issues here http://www.iceinspace.com.au/index.p...63,260,0,0,1,0

Malcolm
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  #1503  
Old 28-08-2013, 06:14 AM
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mulberry (Suz)
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Thanks Stu and Malcolm,

I think it was Chris with the dob. I am having trouble choosing between a decent refractor for ease of use and a, say, 8" dob for the capability. I am trawling the classifieds to see whats turns up. I think the first step is to try a few out by getting myself to some club nights when I am in Brisbane.
Cheers,
Suz
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  #1504  
Old 18-11-2013, 07:03 PM
mkeech (Mark)
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Is there an inexpensive but with reasonable results ccd for nexstar 6
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  #1505  
Old 23-12-2013, 09:33 PM
budich (Budi)
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Hi everyone !

totally new to astronomy, but really enjoyed the star-gazing since a long time with plain eyes.

anyone could recommend me the binoculars that may suits me ?

I just read that beginners should using a binoculars at first, what is the main different between binoculars and telescope ?

Thanks !

could anyone giving me a suggestion whether this is a good choice ?

http://www.ozscopes.com.au/celestron...binocular.html
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  #1506  
Old 24-12-2013, 07:33 AM
TerryC
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OK, this is where I will start !

I have just purchased a Celestron CEGM 11" EdgeHD which I set up for the first time two nights ago, and was very pleased with the first up performance in the polluted Brisbane sky.

My main focus will be astrophotography, however I looked at the "beginners astrophotography" section, and....are you serious ? I've been around long enough to know that most if not all the photos posted there simply cannot be achieved by real beginners.
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  #1507  
Old 24-12-2013, 07:54 AM
philipheaven (Philip)
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Hi Budi,
Binoculars are a good choice for starting out in astronomy.

I wouldn't recommend those Celestron 15x70 unless you wanted to get a tripod as well. Binoculars with magnification more than 12x are usually not suited to being hand held, as the extra magnification will emphasise any wobbling from your hands, making whatever your looking at dance around a lot. This is especially the case with heavier binoculars.

I think one of the best places to buy binoculars is Obewerk. Check out this site

http://www.bigbinoculars.com

I've bought binoculars from these guys and their service is fantastic and the binoculars are brilliant. They all have fully multi coated lenses and BK4 prisms. With the market in optical products these days I would't purchase binoculars unless they had these two things at minimum. I don't think those celestron sky masters are fully multi coated.

I've recently purchased the 11x56 from Oberwerk and they're brilliant. Also took less than 2 weeks to come from Ohio. Including postage they were only $135, which is a much better deal than $239 for the celestron sky masters. The 11x56 are well suited to astronomy, with big 56mm aperture and good magnification for hand held use. Also, they come in at exactly 1kg, which makes therm perfect for long periods of hand held use.

One other thing, I'd steer clear of ozcsopes. Their staff are not knowledgeable at all (the people I've dealt with aren't even interested in astronomy, nor use astronomical products) and their service post sale is non existent.
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  #1508  
Old 24-12-2013, 01:16 PM
budich (Budi)
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Hi Philip !

Thanks for the advice unfortunately I just ordered it yesterday and the package supposed to come today or tomorrow but it comes with a tripod package luckily .

After reading your suggestion, i have no idea whether i bought the right things, anyway i'll take it as a lesson as im totally new to this things and yes they have fully multi coated lenses and BK4 prisms

I saw your location was in Melbourne too ! any idea where to start this star-gazing or how to do it better?




Quote:
Originally Posted by philipheaven View Post
Hi Budi,
Binoculars are a good choice for starting out in astronomy.

I wouldn't recommend those Celestron 15x70 unless you wanted to get a tripod as well. Binoculars with magnification more than 12x are usually not suited to being hand held, as the extra magnification will emphasise any wobbling from your hands, making whatever your looking at dance around a lot. This is especially the case with heavier binoculars.

I think one of the best places to buy binoculars is Obewerk. Check out this site

http://www.bigbinoculars.com

I've bought binoculars from these guys and their service is fantastic and the binoculars are brilliant. They all have fully multi coated lenses and BK4 prisms. With the market in optical products these days I would't purchase binoculars unless they had these two things at minimum. I don't think those celestron sky masters are fully multi coated.

I've recently purchased the 11x56 from Oberwerk and they're brilliant. Also took less than 2 weeks to come from Ohio. Including postage they were only $135, which is a much better deal than $239 for the celestron sky masters. The 11x56 are well suited to astronomy, with big 56mm aperture and good magnification for hand held use. Also, they come in at exactly 1kg, which makes therm perfect for long periods of hand held use.

One other thing, I'd steer clear of ozcsopes. Their staff are not knowledgeable at all (the people I've dealt with aren't even interested in astronomy, nor use astronomical products) and their service post sale is non existent.
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  #1509  
Old 24-12-2013, 03:00 PM
philipheaven (Philip)
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Hi Budi,
That's good they included a tripod. You'll still get excellent use out of them, especially with the 70mm aperture.

Get yourself a good sky map. I find the maps in Sky and Telescope Australia mag to be very useful. The current issue December/January also has a guide to some excellent summer time binocular targets and information on how to find them.

Where in Melbourne are you? I'm in Camberwell.
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  #1510  
Old 24-12-2013, 04:50 PM
budich (Budi)
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Hi Phillip,

thanks for the response, it was very helpful .

is this an example of skymap you talking about ?

http://www.skymaps.com/skymaps/tesmn1312.pdf

If so, I'm totally lost about how to use it, not even able to get what it means .

Why the west side are on the right whilst the east side are on the left ?

Any idea where i can get an information to start using the map ?

I'm in Nunawading


Quote:
Originally Posted by philipheaven View Post
Hi Budi,
That's good they included a tripod. You'll still get excellent use out of them, especially with the 70mm aperture.

Get yourself a good sky map. I find the maps in Sky and Telescope Australia mag to be very useful. The current issue December/January also has a guide to some excellent summer time binocular targets and information on how to find them.

Where in Melbourne are you? I'm in Camberwell.
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  #1511  
Old 24-12-2013, 09:29 PM
philipheaven (Philip)
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Yep that is the kind of map I'm talking about. I'd still recommend going to your local newsagent and picking up a copy of the Australian Sky and Telescope. The maps in there are very clear and easy to read.

I'll use the instructions listed in the magazine to help explain how to use the map.

Go outside and turn the map around so the label you're facing is right side up. For example, face south, and then hold the map so the word south is facing right side up. At this point you'll notice that west is on the right hand side of the map, and east is on the left hand side. This will also be the case with your actual directions - when facing south, west is also on the right, and east on the left. The curved edge of the map will now represent the horizon. You'll notice the southern cross (or crux) is on the edge of the map, i.e. on the curved edge of the map. Crux is also low on the horizon. Moving away from the edge of the map towards the middle of the map corresponds to moving away from the horizon towards the point directly over your head (known as the zenith). Stars halfway between the middle of the map (zenith) and the edge of the map (horizon) are located in the sky halfway between the horizon and zenith.

An example from the magazine reads as follows -

Face north east. Now turn the map around so the label "facing north east" is the right side up. About halfway between the edge of the map and the centre of the map is the star Procyon. Now look north east, halfway between the horizon and the zenith (point directly over your head). There's Procyon.

It takes a bit of getting used to. I found it hard a first corresponding stars and lines on the maps to the night sky, but stick with it. It will eventually get easy and you'll soon be star hopping your way around the sky in no time at all.

Also that map you've linked to on the thread is for the northern hemisphere. You need to make sure you stick with the southern hemisphere maps. So if you were in the northern hemisphere and you followed the instruction above and faced north east, the star Capella should be roughly half way between the horizon and the zenith.

Hope that helps.
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  #1512  
Old 24-12-2013, 10:55 PM
budich (Budi)
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That is awesome ! helped me so much, eventhough still didnt get it on some parts, but yea thanks for your help, i'll take a look of that mag you recommended for tmr .


Quote:
Originally Posted by philipheaven View Post
Yep that is the kind of map I'm talking about. I'd still recommend going to your local newsagent and picking up a copy of the Australian Sky and Telescope. The maps in there are very clear and easy to read.

I'll use the instructions listed in the magazine to help explain how to use the map.

Go outside and turn the map around so the label you're facing is right side up. For example, face south, and then hold the map so the word south is facing right side up. At this point you'll notice that west is on the right hand side of the map, and east is on the left hand side. This will also be the case with your actual directions - when facing south, west is also on the right, and east on the left. The curved edge of the map will now represent the horizon. You'll notice the southern cross (or crux) is on the edge of the map, i.e. on the curved edge of the map. Crux is also low on the horizon. Moving away from the edge of the map towards the middle of the map corresponds to moving away from the horizon towards the point directly over your head (known as the zenith). Stars halfway between the middle of the map (zenith) and the edge of the map (horizon) are located in the sky halfway between the horizon and zenith.

An example from the magazine reads as follows -

Face north east. Now turn the map around so the label "facing north east" is the right side up. About halfway between the edge of the map and the centre of the map is the star Procyon. Now look north east, halfway between the horizon and the zenith (point directly over your head). There's Procyon.

It takes a bit of getting used to. I found it hard a first corresponding stars and lines on the maps to the night sky, but stick with it. It will eventually get easy and you'll soon be star hopping your way around the sky in no time at all.

Also that map you've linked to on the thread is for the northern hemisphere. You need to make sure you stick with the southern hemisphere maps. So if you were in the northern hemisphere and you followed the instruction above and faced north east, the star Capella should be roughly half way between the horizon and the zenith.

Hope that helps.
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  #1513  
Old 24-12-2013, 11:57 PM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
Bright the hawk's flight

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Quote:
Originally Posted by budich View Post

Why the west side are on the right whilst the east side are on the left ?
This is a map of the sky, so it shows what you would see if you are looking up.
Walk out side, face south and look straight up, the west will be on your right side and east on your left, south in front and north behind you. If you print out the map, walk outside and hold it above your head it will be aligned the same way.

Malcolm
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  #1514  
Old 24-12-2013, 11:59 PM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
Bright the hawk's flight

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When Phillip said skymap, he was of course referring to any chart or map, not a particular one.

The one I started with can be bought here http://www.bintel.com.au/Accessories...oductview.aspx and is a good starting point

Malcolm
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  #1515  
Old 11-01-2014, 09:41 AM
downhill (Brenton)
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G'day, I'm Brenton.

A couple of nights ago I was watching the sky for Auroras, and taking 30 second exposures in case they were too faint for me to see, and encountered an object that I don't understand.

I Have attached one of the photos I took.

What I am confused about is in the top right corner. It occurred in 10 consecutive 30 second exposures, and then 10 more later with the camera in a different position.

Can anyone tell me what this is or is it just lense flare?

It was taken in daylesford, vic on jan 10 at around 12-1:00 am facing what i think was roughly south.

Thanks
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (IMG_1580.JPG)
59.6 KB145 views

Last edited by downhill; 11-01-2014 at 09:42 AM. Reason: mistake
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  #1516  
Old 11-01-2014, 12:05 PM
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pluto (Hugh)
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Welcome!

The purple/blue streak in the top right corner looks like a lens flare from that bright light in the lower left of frame.
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  #1517  
Old 11-01-2014, 04:33 PM
downhill (Brenton)
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Thanks
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  #1518  
Old 12-01-2014, 12:15 PM
linstar88 (Linda and Guy)
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Hello

Hi all,
My husband (Guy) and I (Linda) are new IIS forum members. FYI we will both use this account to post messages/questions etc. provided it's not a problem (team effort).
We are both fairly new to astronomy sky watching (with a half decent telescope). Recently purchased for the task was a 12" f/5 dobsonian from Bintel.
There is quite a lot to learn as you all know, so expect to see a lot of posts with many beginners questions from us.
We will be very interested in upgrades, add-ons and what accessories to use for best results.
This site comes highly recommended and has already provided us with some much needed info. The main thing we are looking for now aside from better eyepieces to use is some choice quiet dark locations to set up on clear nights.
Using the dob in the back yard is ok, but not an ideal location as there is a lot of light interference from neighbours and or street lamps.
After making a light shield for the telescope and blocking off direct light with petitions, viewing is greatly improved. Best guess is a good quality sodium light filter may help improve things a little more from indirect light in the immediate atmosphere.
Any advice from members will be greatly appreciated and most welcome on any and all aspects of astronomy / viewing / equipment / upgrades / locations and so on.

Thank you all for your warm welcome to IIS.
Linda and Guy.
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  #1519  
Old 12-01-2014, 03:57 PM
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Allan_L (Allan)
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Hello Linda and Guy
Welcome to IceInSpace

Nice choice of scope.

Is 86k north too far?
(Google map says an hour and 10 minutes for you).

A small informal group (from Central Coast Newcastle Syney)
come here regularly, close to New Moon, at Mangrove Mountain (The Pony Club grounds on Wisemans ferry road.) (FREE to attend)
Sky is good for close to the city.

There is another group who meet similarly at the Katoomba airstrip if that is closer. (but I doubt it).

Have a look at the Star Parties Forum for other happenings (mostly informal) and location map for Mangrove Mountain.

In April is IISAC (the formal annual IIS astro camp at Lostock.) (FEES apply)

Dark sites have also been discussed in various other IIS threads, try a search.

We'd also love you to join a few of us for an astro camping trip to Chaffey Dam, Nundle from Feb 25 to Mar2. ($5 per night)
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  #1520  
Old 12-01-2014, 11:12 PM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
Bright the hawk's flight

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Hi Linda and Guy and welcome to IIS!
My 3rd scope was a GSO 12" dob which was essentially the same as the Bintel one. It is a big scope for a first one, which is not to say it is not suitable as long as you are happy with the size etc.
The good thing about a scope like that is that it is basically ready to go, the first accessory I got was Dew heaters. It is possible to use a hair dryer but it gets annoying having to stop observing to use it. I went with a set of Kendrick straps, and secondary wrap around heater and Digifire 7 controller and a battery that I mounted on the base of the scope. You can go cheaper but it worked really well for me.
The other essential is a good atlas. A big scope like this can see lots of objects so an atlas that will enable you to star hop successfully is a big help. Sky Atlas 2000 is a good starting point or even better Uranometria 2000. The Deep Sky Observers Guide 3 volume set is very good and will give you lots of targets to aim for.
My usual advice with eyepieces is to stick with the ones that came with the scope to start off. Try to get to an observing night and talk to others about eyepieces or even give them a try before spending cash. It is VERY easy to spend a lot of $$$ on eps, but you need to know that they are what you want.
With filters and light pollution I am lucky that it is not too bad a problem here so I really use them to improve contrast rather than reducing LP, so cannot comment on their usefulness for LP reduction. I have used the GSO filters that Bintel sell (both the Nebula and OIII) and found them satisfactory. Now have an Astronomik OIII and is is very nice, although a bit expensive in the 2" version. Really good contrast, sharp images.

Anyway hope this helps!

Malcolm
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