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Old 13-01-2011, 01:05 PM
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Paddy (Patrick)
Canis Minor

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Observation notes 7/1/11

Dear all,

Here are some notes from my observing session on 7th Jan. I started with some beautiful open clusters in Puppis (after chasing NgC1792 and 1808 aroudn the zenith) and ended up drifting into the Large Magellanic Cloud. Just for a change.

Thanks for reading.

Telescope 410mm (16”) f4.9 tri-dob reflector
Eyepieces 28mm UWAN, 17,13,9 mm Naglers, Paracorr
Navigation: Night Sky Observer’s Guide, my own charts of LMC Chart (#14 and #11 in particular) available at http://www.cloudsofmagellan.net.au

2305

Seeing good 2/5
Transparency good 6/7

Position data for NGC objects are from the NGC/IC Project web site (http://www.ngcicproject.org/ngcicdb.asp) and those for SL objects from Mati Morel’s revised Shapley Lindsay catalogue at http://www.asnsw.com/articles/clouds/lmc-sl.asp and Henize nebula data from his similar work at http://www.asnsw.com/articles/clouds/lmc-henize.asp

Quite bright zodiacal light is visible to the west. Mosquitoes are abundant.

NGC 1808 GX in Columba
05h 07 42.3 -37 30 47
V = 9.9; Size 6.5x3.9; SB = 13.3

135X Appears about 5’x3’ oval with marked nucleus and some mottled texture, accentuated at 175X. A foreground star at each end of the oval. Although NGC 1792 was at first apparent in the wider field eyepiece, manoeuvering the dob at zenith is too tedious to find it again.

NGC 2477 OC in Puppis
07h 52 10 -38 32.0
V = 5.8; Size 27

Quite obvious as a bright haze in the finderscope. 135X it fills the 37’ TFOV as a broad spray of hundreds of stars which appear of similar magnitude and colour but with many distinct asterisms and dark patches within the cluster itself. Although distinct there are many background stars so that its edges appear softened.

NGC 2451 OC in Puppis
07h 45 15 -37 58.1
V = 2.8; Size 45

135X Very different to neighbouring 2477 – fewer stars about a dozen, but very bright . c Puppis is the brightest of these and is apparently a K giant 1500x the luminosity of the sun. Picking the edges of the cluster is a challenge due to the many adjacent stars.

NGC 2546 OC in Puppis
08h 12 16 -37 35.7
V = 6.3; Size 41

135X A very wide OC with indistinct edges and many bright stars and a small column shaped clustering of stars at the northern edge.

NGC 2360 OC in Canis Major
07h 17 43 -15 38.5
V = 7.2; Size 13

135X A large and intricate OC between the M46/47 area and Sirius. Appears about 17’ across to me with a point to the east. Many stars of similar magnitude and colour. Many interesting little patterns of stars and lanes through the cluster. My first impression was that it could be “the Cauliflower cluster” due to its overall shape and the complexity of star patterns within it.

NGC 2453+2452 OC and PN in Puppis
07h 47 34 -27 11.7
V = 8.3; Size 5

07h 47 26.2 -27 20 08
V = 11.9; Size 31"x24"

135X A very attractive, kite shaped cluster of about 20 stars and some nebulosity, elongated E-W with the lucida to the north and another bright star to the south. UHC filter confirms that there is some emission nebula associated with this OC with the same shape as the cluster. A line of haze to the south increases the apparent size of the object. Nearby is NGC 2452, a faint N-S oval of haze with no central star. I have the impression of 2 lobes which is more marked at 250X. This is more like 2 areas of brightness, not a division by a distinct waist. Appears fairly uniform. Responds better to OIII than UHC filter. No more detail, appears a bit grainy and more distinct. The double lobed appearance remains.

NGC 2483 OC in Puppis
07h 55 39 -27 53.2
V = 7.6; Size 10

80X Just to the north of a little triangle of stars. Not incredibly distinct against the Milky Way disc. Elongated E-W, but appears to have a central part with somewhat curled projections to the east and west, looking vaguely uterine. Appears about 10’x6’

NGC 2489 OC in Puppis
07h 56 16 -30 03.9
V = 7.9; Size 8

135X Well defined cluster as the background stars are fainter than those around other OCs in the area and the cluster is relatively concentrated. Appears about 10’ across with about 40 stars of similar magnitude. Several graceful arcs of stars adorn this cluster. Nearby to the south is Haffner 20

Haffner 20 OC in Puppis
07h 56.3 –30 24
V11.0 Dia2.2’

135X Quite faint with some resolvable stars against irregular patch of diffuse luminosity

I move to the southern part of the Large Magellanic Cloud…

To the south of the LMC bar is a wide triangle formed by the stars 53, 55 and 63 Mensae with 53 at its apex. Just to the northeast of 53 Mensae is another star then NGC 1848.

NGC 1848 OC + Emission nebula in LMC
05h 07m 27.2 -71 11' 44"
V 9.7 Size 3’

135X A fairly extended and irregular patch of stars and haze. Some resolvable stars form a broad U shape with the base pointing back towards 53 Mensae but other strands of stars and haze surround this U. Looks quite a bit bigger to me than 3’ (I estimate 10’x6’) NSOG lists it as 5’ across. 175X A patch of haze on the NE side stands out more. UHC filter further accentuates this knot and the western edge shows a distinct line of haze. The NGC/IC project lists this as an open cluster, NSOG as a cluster and nebulosity – the results with the UHC filter suggest the latter to me.

To the north of 1848 is

Shapley/Lindsay 209 OC in LMC
5h 4 37.7 -70 54 37
1.1’x0.9’

135X A bright distinct double clump of gossamer sitting in a small triangle of stars. Appears to me 2’x1’. 175X Seems to now have 3 sub-sections and itself becomes a triangle within the triangular asterism. Less distinct with UHC filter.

Further to the north is the spectacular NGC 1845 complex

NGC1845/1833/1837 + SL 232 OCs and Emission nebulae in LMC

1845 05h 06m 22.0s -70 28' 45" V 10.2 Size 21’
1833 5h 04m 21.8s -70 43' 54" Size 2’
1837 05h 04m 55.9s -70 42' 51" Size 1.4’
SL232 5h 6 27.6 -70 28 48 Size 1.3’

135X A large SW-NE oval of many resolvable stars at least 20’ long by 10’ wide, patchy and interesting structure. 2 bright patches at the SE pole are NGC1833 & 1837, both clusters with nebulae. 1833 is the westernmost of the 2 and significantly larger, but 1837 is brighter with more resolvable stars. At the northern end is another bright and large knot of haze, which is SL 232 with no resolvable stars. 175x The whole thing becomes even more interesting 1833 looks about 2’x3’ across and 1837 about 2’ dia. More stars can be resolved in 1837 at this power and 1833 looks to have an arched shape a bit reminiscent of Delphinus. Throughout 1845 there are many patches of stars and haze. SL 232 appears as a broad oval of haze slightly elongated NE-SW, but with no discernible texture. With UHC filter 1833 and 1837 light up considerably, but many other small clumps of luminosity become apparent in 1845. There seem to be strands of clumpy haze through 1845 culminating in a U shape at the northern end with the base of the U pointing west. SL 232 disappears.

To the west of 1845 is an equilateral triangle of stars. Between this triangle and middle of 1845 is

NGC 1815 OC in LMC
05h 02m 27.3s -70 37' 16"
V 12.4 Dia .3’

175X A small circle of haze with very distinct core surrounded by a small gentle halo <1’ across

To the north is another complex area – in one AFOV of 28’ from the NW edge of NGC 1845 is a flat triangle of clusters -SL 200, and NGCs 1823 & 1813

Shapley Lindsay 200 OC in LMC
5 h 3 45.0 -70 24 0 1.3’x 1.1’

175X Elongated roughly E-W, fairly faint with no distinct core looks much longer than wide – I estimate 2’x1’

NGC 1823 OC in LMC
05h 03m 25.0s -70 20' 08"
V 12.1 dia 0.9’
175X Bright and distinct with some resolvable stars slightly elongated SE-NW. Appears about 2’x1’

NGC 1813 OC in LMC
05h 02m 40.3s -70 19' 05"
V 12.8 dia 0.7’
175X Fairly round 1’ across with impression of core in an otherwise soft glow. With UHC filter, the trio of SL200 & NGCs 1823 & 1813 appear to be set within a boomerang shape of faint nebulosity.

NGC 1791 + Shapley/Lindsay 158 + Henize N186 Open Clusters and Emission nebula in LMC
04h 59m 06.5s -70 10' 08"/ 4 59 14.4 -70 15 24/ 5 0 52 -70 13 40

175X N186 is a fairly broad, faint patch of haze with few resolvable stars. On the western edge, 2 knots stand out. To the south is the brighter of the two, SL158 which looks about 1’ across, quite round and even with distinct wide core in soft halo. NGC 1791 is a very soft, broad glow with some central concentration fading evenly to the edges. With UHC filter, the nebula stands out a little more but is still quite faint, looks round and about 15’ across.

Last edited by Paddy; 13-01-2011 at 01:10 PM. Reason: trying to stop position data being registered as phone number
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Old 16-01-2011, 12:09 PM
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Ngc 2477

Nice report Paddy. How good is NGC 2477! My first encounter with 2477 occured when I swept it up by chance with the 120st and my first thought was wow another Omega Centauri . Not sure why this stunning object is virtually unheard of both in literature and amongst amatuers, it's not that uber far south! It's made even better by its neighbour 2451, lovely in the 120st at low power, showing two extremes in the varieties of open cluster shoulder to shoulder, however according to Steve Gottleib's notes in NGC IC, 2451 might actually be a random grouping. Either way, what a gem of a pair.

Incidentally I observed NGC 2452 aswell last night and clearly saw those 2 lobes you mentioned. Reminds me of a hamburger, which did not help the late night hunger pangs! The southern lobe seems to have a nearly stellar bright spot in it.


I hear ya about the mozzies, damn things were giving me hell last night. There wasn't many biting me, but when they buzz around your head, that noise they make is enough to make me scream in pure rage Hate this summer, cold, cloudy and mosquito ridden, first time in my life I'll say, bring on winter!

Cheers

Last edited by pgc hunter; 16-01-2011 at 10:06 PM.
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Old 16-01-2011, 10:24 PM
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barx1963 (Malcolm)
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Nice report Paddy and thanks for sharing. Seeing your notes and Sabs comments prompted me to lookup my notes from observing NGC 2477 back in Dec 09. I described it as glorious and would love to see it from a darker site, must remember to have a look at it when at SV in March.

Malcolm
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Old 17-01-2011, 07:10 AM
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orestis
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Hi Paddy,

Nice report,I haven't had a clear night in ages.Yesterday was clear but the moon washed out most things(still should of observed,but still have mosquito bites from 2 weeks ago)

thanks for posting
cheers Orestis
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Old 17-01-2011, 10:25 AM
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Paddy (Patrick)
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Thanks all! The old Argo Navis constellation must be one of the riches for DSOs especially OCs. You could spend years on it I reckon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pgc hunter View Post
Nice report Paddy. How good is NGC 2477! My first encounter with 2477 occured when I swept it up by chance with the 120st and my first thought was wow another Omega Centauri . Not sure why this stunning object is virtually unheard of both in literature and amongst amatuers, it's not that uber far south! It's made even better by its neighbour 2451, lovely in the 120st at low power, showing two extremes in the varieties of open cluster shoulder to shoulder, however according to Steve Gottleib's notes in NGC IC, 2451 might actually be a random grouping. Either way, what a gem of a pair.

Incidentally I observed NGC 2452 aswell last night and clearly saw those 2 lobes you mentioned. Reminds me of a hamburger, which did not help the late night hunger pangs! The southern lobe seems to have a nearly stellar bright spot in it.


I hear ya about the mozzies, damn things were giving me hell last night. There wasn't many biting me, but when they buzz around your head, that noise they make is enough to make me scream in pure rage Hate this summer, cold, cloudy and mosquito ridden, first time in my life I'll say, bring on winter!

Cheers
I'll have to go back to 2452 and see if I can find the cherry in the hamburger. Hmmm... strange culinary thought that. The worst thing about the heat is that it's impossible to cover up enough to keep the mozzies at bay. the only problem with hoping for winter is wishing away some great constellations and they already seem to march across the sky so quickly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by barx1963 View Post
Nice report Paddy and thanks for sharing. Seeing your notes and Sabs comments prompted me to lookup my notes from observing NGC 2477 back in Dec 09. I described it as glorious and would love to see it from a darker site, must remember to have a look at it when at SV in March.

Malcolm
Maybe we could do a tour of some of the Puppis clusters - if I remember correctly, you've done obs on heaps of them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by orestis View Post
Hi Paddy,

Nice report,I haven't had a clear night in ages.Yesterday was clear but the moon washed out most things(still should of observed,but still have mosquito bites from 2 weeks ago)

thanks for posting
cheers Orestis
2 weeks - that's dreadful. At least mine are gone by the morning. 'Twould be a very strong disincentive to get the scope out.
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Old 17-01-2011, 12:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddy View Post
Thanks all! The old Argo Navis constellation must be one of the riches for DSOs especially OCs. You could spend years on it I reckon.
Come to think of it, I cannot think of a better region of sky for Open Clusters.



Quote:
I'll have to go back to 2452 and see if I can find the cherry in the hamburger. Hmmm... strange culinary thought that. The worst thing about the heat is that it's impossible to cover up enough to keep the mozzies at bay. the only problem with hoping for winter is wishing away some great constellations and they already seem to march across the sky so quickly.
Yeah give 2452 another crack and concentrate on the southern lobe, you'll likely pick up a bright almost stellar patch in it. Get the barlows out if seeing cooperates

Last edited by pgc hunter; 17-01-2011 at 12:28 PM.
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