Go Back   IceInSpace > General Astronomy > Celestial and Astronomical Events

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 04-12-2020, 10:36 AM
John W (John Wilkinson)
Registered User

John W is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Castlemaine, Victoria, Australia
Posts: 630
Hyabussa2 probe to land at Woomera Dec 6th

Japanese Space probe has landed at Woomera Dec 6th…. By John Wilkinson
A capsule containing rocks from an asteroid has landed near Woomera in South Australia on Sunday December 6, 2020. This event will mark the end of a six-year mission for the Hayabusa2 spacecraft. Hayabusa2 was launched in December 2014 to study the asteroid Ryugu and collect samples to bring to Earth for analysis. When the spacecraft arrived at the asteroid in June 2018, it deployed two rovers and a small lander onto the surface. These were the first rovers ever to operate on an asteroid. Hayabusa2 then fired an impactor into the asteroid in February 2019 to create an artificial crater. This allowed the spacecraft to collect a sample from beneath the surface of the asteroid.

After Hayabusa2 dropped the capsule it continued into deep space. As about half of the fuel (xenon) for the ion engine is expected to remain at this time, the explorer will continue on to a new mission – to visit a very small asteroid called 1998 KY26. At only 30m across, it was a world-first to rendezvous with this type of asteroid. As large meteorites that are likely to impact the earth, are believed to be the same type of asteroid as 1998 KY26, knowing its characteristics are therefore very important for planetary defence.



Latest update after landing confirmed:
<https://www.space.com/japan-hayabusa2-asteroid-samples-land-australia>

Last edited by John W; 06-12-2020 at 09:55 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-01-2021, 04:58 PM
cannon_gray (Cannon Gray)
Member

cannon_gray is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2020
Location: Dresden
Posts: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by John W View Post
Japanese Space probe has landed at Woomera Dec 6th. By John Wilkinson
A capsule containing rocks from an asteroid has landed near Woomera in South Australia on Sunday December 6, 2020. This event will mark the end of a six-year mission for the Hayabusa2 spacecraft. Hayabusa2 was launched in December 2014 to study the asteroid Ryugu and collect samples to bring to Earth for analysis. When the spacecraft arrived at the asteroid in June 2018, it deployed two rovers and a small lander onto the surface. These were the first rovers ever to operate on an asteroid. Hayabusa2 then fired an impactor into the asteroid in February 2019 to create an artificial crater. This allowed the spacecraft to collect a sample from beneath the surface of the asteroid.

After Hayabusa2 dropped the capsule it continued into deep space. As about half of the fuel (xenon) for the ion engine is expected to remain at this time, the explorer will continue on to a new mission to visit a very small asteroid called 1998 KY26. At only 30m across, it was a world-first to rendezvous with this type of asteroid. As large meteorites that are likely to impact the earth, are believed to be the same type of asteroid as 1998 KY26, knowing its characteristics are therefore very important for planetary defence.



Latest update after landing confirmed:
<https://www.space.com/japan-hayabusa2-asteroid-samples-land-australia>
Hayabusa2 then fired an impactor into the asteroid in February 2019 to create an artificial crater. Is it allowed to harm space objects? As far as I know, there is an agreement signed in the 60s according to which any of the countries are not permitted to make any changes to space objects. According to the treaty, outer space is intended only for peaceful use and scientific research.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 08:02 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Testar
Advertisement
Limpet Controller
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement