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Old 06-10-2020, 05:27 PM
Terranova (Adrian)
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So I bought a Planisphere. Now what

Hi,
got my planisphere from the good folks at Quazer. I've looked at youtube vids but couldnt find one that actually shows someone using it outside at night. does anyone have any links or tips of how to use this thing?

cheers

Adrian
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Old 06-10-2020, 06:15 PM
astro744
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1. Confirm you have Southern Hemisphere version.
2. Line up the date with the time you happen to be outside.
3. Pick a cardinal direction, I.e. NESW and face that direction.
4. Hold Planisphere vertical at arms length matching the cardinal direction printed on the Planisphere with the direction you are facing.
5. As the night progresses, rotate the Planisphere wheel to match the time.
6. The rotation of the sky around the south celestial pole will match the rotation of Planisphere.
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Old 06-10-2020, 06:25 PM
astro744
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Just a further note. If you face south the centre of rotation is at the south celestial pole, the angle of which above the horizon is your latitude. Stars rotate clockwise around the SCP.

Note the sky at a particular time and date in say, early October at 8pm will be the same in early June at 4am.
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Old 08-10-2020, 04:24 PM
Renato1 (Renato)
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Get a dim flashlight - either with low battery power, or put a few layers of insulation tape over it to dim it down.

Set date and time on the planisphere, walk outside, and face south. Hold the planisphere over your head with the south part of the planisphere pointing south, and aim your flashlight at it.

Find the Southern Cross and Pointers on the planisphere, and match them up to the Southern Cross and Pointers in the sky. Start learning the major stars and constellations in that part of the sky by matching the planisphere to the sky.

Later, face north. Then do the same with whichever brights stars or bright constellation you see.

Though you might get thrown by planets. Look up planet rise time for Jupiter say, set that time on the planisphere, and you will know that Jupiter's position will be somewhere either side of the line marked as ecliptic on the side of the planisphere.
Cheers,
Renato
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Old 08-10-2020, 04:38 PM
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mswhin63 (Malcolm)
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There are a number of Youtube videos available that describe how to use a planisphere, although most are Northern Hemisphere. The process of looking at it is the same. I wont to any one, but have a look and get a rough idea first then more detailed questions are easier to answer. Many people use a Planisphere in slightly different ways.
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