#1  
Old 17-12-2016, 12:14 PM
benklerk
Registered User

benklerk is offline
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Katoomba
Posts: 214
Baader or Astronomik filters

Hi

Time is coming close for me to get all new gear for my, home made observatory which will be finished by February.
So far as gear goes its GSO 12"RC, EQ8 and a Moravian Inst G4-9000 or G4-16803. What would be better a 7 square 50mnm filter wheel or a 9 unmounted 50mm filter wheel? At least with a 9 a can get a clear filter.

I've been look at filters and the 2 brands I choose are Baader or Astronomik. Astrodon is to expensive, so it's a long term goal.
I was thinking of getting LRGB O3 6nm S2 6nm from Astronomik and Ha 3.5nm from Baader. I did read that the filters did have light issues.

What are people's experience with these filter? Do you have any issues with them? Is there any other information I need to know?

I live between dark green and blue, so I do have good dark skies.

Ben
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 17-12-2016, 12:39 PM
glend (Glen)
Registered User

glend is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 5,258
I live in a similar sky type area. My choice was the Baaders, they are very cost effective if bought as a set (broadband and narrowband) from Teleskop-express. Make sure you open an account with them so you can see the EU export price (-19% VAT). The Baaders are parafocal and i have found that to be more than a claim, i rarely have to refocus on a filter switch. I would not suggest you mix manufacturers as you will definitely have to refocus on a switch. I have nothing bad to say about the Baaders, they work very well for me.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 17-12-2016, 03:56 PM
brisen (Brian)
Registered User

brisen is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Caboolture, Australia
Posts: 190
Given the limited chance I have had to use the Baader filters I got a few months ago, I have found them to be parfocal. I picked up the LRGB and also the Ha O3 S2 and Hb, and loaded all 9 into an electronic filter wheel.

Brian
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 18-12-2016, 08:55 AM
benklerk
Registered User

benklerk is offline
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Katoomba
Posts: 214
Would there be much of a difference from a 3.5nm baader to a 6nm Astronomik. Same goes with a 6nm O3 and S2 Astronomik compared to a 8nm S2 and 8.5nm O3?

Does anyone have screen shot comparison or links to other websites?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 18-12-2016, 09:34 AM
gregbradley's Avatar
gregbradley
Registered User

gregbradley is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 15,224
First of all I would not get the 09000 Moravian. That would be a mistake. That sensor has bad residual ghost images and the Moravian as far as I know does not have RBI (residual bulk image) option like FLI does. The 16803 is by far the better sensor and is a workhorse and has not been bettered since it was released and it would appear its unlikely to be bettered by a future CCD since CCD is on its way out.

I have had Baaders. I agree with the advice not to mix manufacturers you would regret that too. I use Astrodons which are also parfocal. Having parfocal filters (including the narrowbands) is vital. To focus my Astrodon Ha I use the luminance filter and focus that and then I switch to the Ha and bang its in focus. Focusing a Ha or S11 filter by itself is tedious and slow. You will have to use long focus exposures and it adds on a lot of time. You won't be able to program a series of exposures from LRGB to Ha without a refocus or a focus offset (and hope that offset is the same for varying temperatures which it probably isn't).

Baaders tend to give a good red response. They are not 1:1:1 colour combine like they claim. Nowhere near it. So there is some experimentation to get the correct colour combine ratios.

Astrodon are expensive but well worth it for these factors. Far easier to get a natural looking colour straight away without a lot of messing around.

Astronomik have out out some nice filters recently with their ii versions and now I think its 6nm narrowbands.Mike Sidonio is using them and he gets great colour. They promote they get smaller stellar profiles. Check they will fit in your filter wheel as they are 1mm thick not 3mm thick like Astrodons and Baaders and everyone else. So that can screw you. Gerd makes a spacer which is probably a fair bit extra. Some filter wheels will accept different thickness filters - Apogee, FLI. Not sure about Moravian. Better check there.

My opinion is the newer Astronomiks and the latest narrowband filters with correct spacers to fit would be the better set of filters over Baader.

I had a 7n Ha Baader once that was defective (lots of little salt and pepper specks in the images) and the colour balance is off with too much red.

I would predict it would be easier to get natural looking colour from the Astronomiks plus they are cheaper as well. More bang for your buck. More reliable quality control but just watch the spacers that they don't shaft you there.

Greg.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 18-12-2016, 12:07 PM
benklerk
Registered User

benklerk is offline
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Katoomba
Posts: 214
Thanks Greg for your input

I can afford Astrodon LRGB Gen 2 E Tru-balance and one narrowband.

What it be better to get LRGB and 5nm Ha Astrodon. I'll see how much the 3nm is in Australian dollars.

From reading, if I go with the 3nm I would need to get the N2 if I want to shoot in nitrogen. Is it worth getting N2 and what filter would it replace? As I will get a 7 Square filter wheel I will be limited in the number of NB filters, and I'll get the other filters as when I can afford them.

Ben
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 18-12-2016, 03:01 PM
glend (Glen)
Registered User

glend is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 5,258
The Baaders are 2mm thick.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 18-12-2016, 08:08 PM
gregbradley's Avatar
gregbradley
Registered User

gregbradley is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 15,224
Quote:
Originally Posted by benklerk View Post
Thanks Greg for your input

I can afford Astrodon LRGB Gen 2 E Tru-balance and one narrowband.

What it be better to get LRGB and 5nm Ha Astrodon. I'll see how much the 3nm is in Australian dollars.

From reading, if I go with the 3nm I would need to get the N2 if I want to shoot in nitrogen. Is it worth getting N2 and what filter would it replace? As I will get a 7 Square filter wheel I will be limited in the number of NB filters, and I'll get the other filters as when I can afford them.

Ben
I would get the LRGB and 5nm Ha. I don't see any gain in getting 3nm Ha its more the 3nm O111. 5nm Ha gets both the Ha and the N11 so no need for a 3nm Ha which just requires longer exposure time to pick up a little bit more detail. I considered getting the 3nm at one point but Don recommended the 3nm for the O111 and if you look at his images he often uses the 5nm Ha and the 3nm O111.

I'd add the O111 later as most targets are LRGB or HaLRGB.

Greg.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 18-12-2016, 09:27 PM
Camelopardalis's Avatar
Camelopardalis (Dunk)
Drifting from the pole

Camelopardalis is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 4,611
+1 the OIII is in the visual band, so the narrower filter there should help keep the sky glow under control, even while the Moon is around. Ha is outside of most (all?) man-made illumination.

FWIW, I've got the Baader narrowband set and for kicks I was imaging the other night under a full Moon, the Orion Nebula even, which was about 25 degrees away. The background sky was noticeably brighter in OIII than in Ha.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 22-12-2016, 05:15 PM
gregbradley's Avatar
gregbradley
Registered User

gregbradley is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sydney
Posts: 15,224
Even with 5nm narrowbnd filters I find its usually not good enough during a full moon. If the object is not near the moon then its usually good enough up to say a 2/3rds moon.

Greg.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 22-12-2016, 06:40 PM
glend (Glen)
Registered User

glend is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 5,258
My personal practice is to never image with Oiii when the Moon is in the sky (there are a few exceptions where you can pinch some time, like a thin crescent just setting or rising and more than 90 degrees away from your scope). It does not matter how thin the Oiii bandpass is of your particular filter. The problem is that the Oiii band pass is smack in the middle of the reflected light spectrum of the Moon. I have watched the impact of the Moon on Oiii histograms and that tells the story.
By all means do all the Sii and Ha you wish when the Moon is hanging around. Generally accepted principles still apply, do not allow the Moon to shine into the scope, keep it at least 45 degrees off the opening assuming a good light shield, and 90 degrees is preferred.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 05:29 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
SkyWatcher Australia
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
Celestron Australia
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
Meade Australia
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement