#901  
Old 24-09-2009, 06:26 PM
Doc63 (Neil)
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Hi everyone,

I'm very new to astronomy, and don't own a telescope yet. I have a pair of 7 X 50 binoculars and I'm planning on buying a pair of 10 x 50s soon. I didn't realise how much you could actually see through a pair of binoculars until a couple of weeks ago. Now I'm hooked! I bought a copy of "Heavens Above" by Robert Bee and a Star Wheel and as soon as there is a clear sky, I'm out there.

I've joined the Astronomical Society of Victoria and was planning to do their New Astronomers Group course next year. I was wondering if anyone here had done the course, and if so, is it worth doing, keeping in mind that my knowledge of the subject is very limited. I thought that at the very least, I'd be able to look through a few different types of telescopes before taking the plunge.

Regards

Neil
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  #902  
Old 24-09-2009, 08:41 PM
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erick (Eric)
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Neil, you are on the right path. I haven't done the course. By the time one became available, I was a six month "expert"! Sounds like you are catching it at the right time.

10x50s plus Robert's book plus a Planisphere - You're laughin'!

Tell us what you see.
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  #903  
Old 25-09-2009, 05:53 AM
Doc63 (Neil)
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Hi Eric,

Well, so far with the 7 x 50s, I've been able to identify the Southern Cross (of course), a fair bit of Centaurus and Triangulum Australe. I also think I've identified Aquila. The fun part is pointing them at a part of the sky where, to the naked eye, there doesn't appear to be any stars, then all of these little points of light appear from nowhere.

How much more should I expect to see through 10 x 50s?

Neil
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  #904  
Old 25-09-2009, 07:07 AM
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erick (Eric)
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Look for Jupiter, the brightest object (apart from the Moon) high above in the early evening. Find NGC 4755 (the Jewel Box Cluster), near the Southern Cross. Try to find the Globular cluster NGC 104 (47 Tucanae) later in the evening. Get up early in the morning and look at the Seven Sisters (The Pleiades, M45). Then look at the great nebula in Orion (M42, the middle "star" of the Sword of Orion).
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  #905  
Old 25-09-2009, 07:13 AM
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Esseth (Alan)
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Yeah, i can vouch for that... i just saw my first nebula last night (M42) and i was just scanning the sky with my 8x60's when i saw this faint bright patch, so i pointed the scope at it... oooh

Binos are so much easier to scan the sky with, now i know why everyone swears by them lol
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  #906  
Old 25-09-2009, 07:35 AM
Doc63 (Neil)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erick View Post
Look for Jupiter, the brightest object (apart from the Moon) high above in the early evening. Find NGC 4755 (the Jewel Box Cluster), near the Southern Cross. Try to find the Globular cluster NGC 104 (47 Tucanae) later in the evening. Get up early in the morning and look at the Seven Sisters (The Pleiades, M45). Then look at the great nebula in Orion (M42, the middle "star" of the Sword of Orion).
Thanks for the advice Eric. I was looking for The Jewel Box last night, but couldn't make it out. I'll look for 47 Tucane next time as well. I forgot to mention that I had also seen Jupiter.

Unfortunately, it looks like the next few nights are going to be pretty ordinary. Hopefully next week we'll get some clear skies.

Neil
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  #907  
Old 25-09-2009, 07:36 AM
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jjjnettie (Jeanette)
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They're great aren't they. Next time you see a really bright meteor, use the binos to check to see if it left a trail behind it. That is awesome. Real star dust.
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  #908  
Old 25-09-2009, 07:57 AM
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erick (Eric)
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Quote:
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Thanks for the advice Eric. I was looking for The Jewel Box last night, but couldn't make it out. ....
Yes Neil, 7x are right on the limit to resolve the stars - I struggled with my old 7x. But with 10x, I think you'll just resolve the main stars, particularly the red/orange star in the middle.
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  #909  
Old 28-09-2009, 03:25 PM
Pogers (Rick)
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Thanks iceman and erick,

I have a Celestron NexStar 130 SLT

It was a gift from my family as they know of my interst in space, i am slwoly learning but any help is really apprciated.

I've been realy interested in Jupiter and i wanted a closer look. What can i do?

thanks for your help.


Quote:
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Hi Rick. 6mm eyepiece x2 sounds like quite high magnification. Could you identify the scope a bit better for us - there are a few "130"s in the Celestron range. Is it a basic EQ mount?

And what are you seeing that you are happy with, using that combination?
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  #910  
Old 28-09-2009, 03:42 PM
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erick (Eric)
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Sorry Rick, don't know that model. I would think it shouldn't wobble too much, so should be OK at reasonable magnifications. Was there much breeze blowing when you were trying that higher magnification? Breeze against a big tube is a problem. Do you have it assembled properly? Everything done up tight that should be?

Won't it GOTO Jupiter for you? Anyway, at present, Jupiter is the brightest spot above us (apart from the Moon) in the mid to late evening. You should be able to point it there.

As suggested, don't try the barlow with the 6mm eyepiece except on those one or two nights a year when the view through the eyepiece is superb.
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  #911  
Old 28-09-2009, 03:55 PM
Pogers (Rick)
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Thnaks - no issue finding Jupiter, i just want a closer look - i will check my scope to ensure its all tight. It was a very breezey night, will try without the barlow.



Quote:
Originally Posted by erick View Post
Sorry Rick, don't know that model. I would think it shouldn't wobble too much, so should be OK at reasonable magnifications. Was there much breeze blowing when you were trying that higher magnification? Breeze against a big tube is a problem. Do you have it assembled properly? Everything done up tight that should be?

Won't it GOTO Jupiter for you? Anyway, at present, Jupiter is the brightest spot above us (apart from the Moon) in the mid to late evening. You should be able to point it there.

As suggested, don't try the barlow with the 6mm eyepiece except on those one or two nights a year when the view through the eyepiece is superb.
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  #912  
Old 03-10-2009, 09:36 AM
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Scorpius51 (John)
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Celestron 130 SLT

Rick, you may like to check out this site that reviews the 130 SLT: http://www.jb.man.ac.uk/public/im/cel130SLT.html. He does talk about tube vibrations. He also adds some extra weight to the mount to help stabilize it.

Cheers & good viewing
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  #913  
Old 13-10-2009, 09:18 AM
romeriolopez (Matt)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pogers View Post
Thanks iceman and erick,

I have a Celestron NexStar 130 SLT

It was a gift from my family as they know of my interst in space, i am slwoly learning but any help is really apprciated.

I've been realy interested in Jupiter and i wanted a closer look. What can i do?

thanks for your help.
Hi,

My father is recently retired and has been a space / astronomy nut for years. I'm thinking of getting him a telescope of some description. He's interested in viewing the planets (and personally I think it would be cool to be able to see Jupiter or the rings on Saturn - even if they are a little fuzzy).

I had settled on a Celestron NexStar 130SLT (reflector) with a 2x Barlow, however someone has suggested a Celestron 102SLT (refractor), which has thrown a spanner in my decision making processes.

There's only a $100 difference in cost at my local shop (Bintelshop).

In short i'm after something that:
- simple enough for a first timer to use (he's a computer geek, so shouldn't have too many problems operating the skyaligh system)
- provides good visibility of objects in the sky (stars / nebulae as well as nearby planets)
- can be packed up and thrown (placed delicately) into the boot of a car and driven to the hills around Adelaide.

The motorized goto system on both these models seem handy, as it will give Dad plenty of things to look at while he discovers how to use it.

I guess i'm after any tips / advice from people who have purchased one or both of these scopes, and their experiences with the scopes.

Is a 2x Barlow a useful addition to each scope?

Is there any other scopes I should consider for the same budget ~$1000?

Sorry for the long first post - i'm still getting my head around the astronomy and telescope vernacular.

Cheers,

Matt
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  #914  
Old 13-10-2009, 09:59 AM
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erick (Eric)
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Hi Matt

The 102 SLT sounds like it might suit your father. No tweaking needed, as you would need to do with a reflector (collimation). Nice and compact. Easy to view through. Computerised GOTO. Should make using it a breeze. I have no direct experience of it, however. Go into Bintel and have a good talk to the guys, explain the situation and see what they recommend. Don't worry about a barlow lens now, in fact it may not be used very much even if you had one. Instead, perhaps one or two better quality 1.25" eyepieces later on?

Let us know how it goes
Eric
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  #915  
Old 14-10-2009, 06:12 AM
Orbit (Guy Walsh)
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New To Southern Forums

HI

My name is Guy and I'm checking out your forum from Preston Lancashire England.

I wanted to see some of the Southern images your taking and see how its all done down under

Cheers
Guy
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  #916  
Old 24-10-2009, 01:29 PM
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Kevnool (Kev)
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Welcome Guy to IIS.

Its a grand place here, we are a friendly bunch of people here.
Enjoy your stay with us,lay back and see how its all done southern style.
Cheers Kev.
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  #917  
Old 27-10-2009, 12:06 AM
Dielectric (Arif)
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Newbie from the Northern Hemisphere

Firstly, I really do envy you guys for being in the southern hemisphere and being in the least light polluted country in the world (well almost).

I was fascinated by IIS- really great stuff and great articles. Many thanks for squeezing in a pomme.

Cheers Arif
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  #918  
Old 28-10-2009, 10:12 AM
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kingkong01 (James)
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hello i am fairly new to astronomy and don't quite know to much about it but i find it really intriguing and fun so i hope i can learn a lot from this site. cheers
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  #919  
Old 28-10-2009, 10:18 AM
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iceman (Mike)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orbit View Post
HI

My name is Guy and I'm checking out your forum from Preston Lancashire England.

I wanted to see some of the Southern images your taking and see how its all done down under

Cheers
Guy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dielectric View Post
Firstly, I really do envy you guys for being in the southern hemisphere and being in the least light polluted country in the world (well almost).

I was fascinated by IIS- really great stuff and great articles. Many thanks for squeezing in a pomme.

Cheers Arif
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingkong01 View Post
hello i am fairly new to astronomy and don't quite know to much about it but i find it really intriguing and fun so i hope i can learn a lot from this site. cheers
Hi guys, and to IceInSpace!

I hope you enjoy your time here, and if you have any questions please don't hesitate to ask!
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  #920  
Old 29-10-2009, 10:01 PM
sushant (Sushant)
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hello everybody... i am a newbie here.... i know very lil abt astronomy n very eager 2 know.... always had many question... first thing first.... d coolest thing is to watch the existence of nothing n everything..... what shows dat ? pictures yes cool wallpapers which brings back d mood even when i just had most frustrating day.... where on this site i can get some cool pictures to fulfill this addiction i have....?
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