#1  
Old 09-06-2012, 12:45 PM
04Stefan07 (Stefan)
Make it so! - Capt.Picard

04Stefan07 is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 1,982
Photoshop Transit of Venus, advice

Hey all.

What a transit that was! I could only see it between 8:16 (when it started) til around 11am. I managed to get just under 80 photos now I would like to photoshop some!

I have been playing around with Photoshop but I wanted to ask on here if anyone has properly done any photos from the transit? The most I have done is put an orange/yellow filter on the image (because of my solar filter the sun comes out white). Could anyone share or give me some advice on improving some images?

I also would like to have one image showing all the positions of Venus, I do have Registax but have no idea how to use it properly (the tutorials on youtube arnt too helpful either).

Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 09-06-2012, 04:39 PM
naskies's Avatar
naskies (Dave)
Registered User

naskies is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 1,865
Quote:
Originally Posted by 04Stefan07 View Post
The most I have done is put an orange/yellow filter on the image (because of my solar filter the sun comes out white). Could anyone share or give me some advice on improving some images?
White light solar images usually have lots of granulation detail - but the detail is all bunched up in the highlights. Try playing around with the curves to see if you can bring out the granulation and sunspot detail, without over-darkening the limb or blowing the highlights.

Quote:
I also would like to have one image showing all the positions of Venus, I do have Registax but have no idea how to use it properly (the tutorials on youtube arnt too helpful either).
Recent versions of Photoshop have an auto-align function (I've never used it), but I believe you can get Registax to output each frame post-alignment (again I've never used it). Once you have a sequence of frames properly aligned, you can add them as layers to the same image and choose a "darken" blending mode.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 30-10-2017, 12:38 AM
OzEclipse's Avatar
OzEclipse (Joe Cali)
Registered User

OzEclipse is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Canberra, Australia
Posts: 948
Hi Stefan. What do you register on to stack?
Did you track with eq or alt-az? If altaz then the positions of Venus will have a curved locus due to the earth's rotation. No auto alignment I know can do this for you.
Cheers
Joe
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 30-10-2017, 01:12 AM
AstroJunk's Avatar
AstroJunk (Jonathan)
Shadow Chaser

AstroJunk is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 1,667
If you take a natural light photo of the sun, you will find that it is actually white Some solar filter and eclipse glass makers add a yellow or orange tinge to falsely represent the 'perceived' colour. We only ever see the sun when it is near the horizon, and those glorious sunsets have much more to do with atmospheric refraction than the real colour of the sun.

BTW, not much yellow in the moon, and guess where that light is coming from indirectly!

I've added a colour shot from 2004.
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (2ndcontact.jpg)
8.9 KB14 views
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-11-2017, 04:06 PM
sil's Avatar
sil (Steve)
Not even a speck of dust

sil is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Canberra
Posts: 1,285
Quote:
Originally Posted by OzEclipse View Post
Hi Stefan. What do you register on to stack?
Did you track with eq or alt-az? If altaz then the positions of Venus will have a curved locus due to the earth's rotation. No auto alignment I know can do this for you.
Cheers
Joe
I shot the entire event, I aligned two ways to get two ways of showing the path venus took. I shot dslr on tripod so one stack is basically aligned to the horizon and you see the arc path of venus.

The other stack I derotated, thankfully the sun was active and lots of interestin sunspots to help with alignment here and this got me the string of pearls straight line path of venus. I think i was the only person in the southern hemisphere to shoot the whole transit and contribute a full data set to a project in Germany to test alternate method of measuring the earth sun distance in a collaboration like Captain Cook was a part of in the last part of the transit cycle. Always regreted not making a hasty camera upgrade at the time, ended buying the camera i would have bought at the time, gave up on nikon releasing the camera i actually wanted.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 04:11 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Meade Australia
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Celestron Australia
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
SkyWatcher Australia
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement