#1  
Old 14-07-2018, 05:11 PM
bluesilver (Peter)
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Adaptors for SLR Camera to Telescope

Hi, i finally made up my mind and went ahead and placed an order for a SkyWatcher 10" Dobsonian goto Telescope.
I didn't go over board with accessories as i finally decided just an light shroud, collimator tool, 5mm eyepiece just to get me started and go for there.
Have to say thanks heaps to everyone helping me out with the basic questions.

I am just chasing up some information on Connecting a Camera to the Dobsonian if anyone can help me out again ( sorry )
The camera is a Digital Canon EOS 5DSR SLR Camera
I have done heaps of research on this and no real answer apart from people having focusing issues due to can't get camera closer enough in to get in focus.

I think you can get a adaptor that goes onto the camera and then you unscrew the piece on the Dobsonian and that lets you mout the camera and adaptor straight on.
Basically just this if i am correct.
https://www.opticscentral.com.au/t-m...U#.W0mf5dIzayI
Am i correct so far or completely wrong?
If i want to use a Barlow X2 which i haven't got yet as i wasn't too sure which way to go, how would i get from this mount above to the barlow?
Completely lost here sorry.
Then the next question is possibly a silly one, but can you actually mount an eye piece to this setup also?
Say for instance, i was viewing something and had a Barlow X2 and a 10mm eyepiece, then i decided i might want to take a photo of it, can i connect up to camera to get this photo, sorry if this is an extremely bad description or idea, just kind of interested to hear what anyone thoughts or ideas would be.
It would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
Peter.
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  #2  
Old 14-07-2018, 07:45 PM
Malcolm
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afaik you only need a Canon t-ring plus a 2" adapter. There's a chart around on the net somewhere that shows the limit of exposures you can make for your latitude before field rotation sets in. From memory about 25 secs max and it's decided on the altitude above the horizon of the target. But you could take multiple shots and stack them. You could possibly use a 2"' GSO barlow but I can't say if you'd achieve focus with it. I use a cmos and or a ccd camera opn my GOTO with average results. A Canon on a SkyWatcher can achieve focus with just the t-ring and adapter, at least it does on mine. The link you posted is for a Sony, not a Canon. https://www.opticscentral.com.au/sax...canon-eos.html Apparently you need a T Adapter as well but I don't see it there.
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Old 14-07-2018, 07:52 PM
astro744
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Have a look at http://www.televue.com/engine/TV3b_p...n=Advice&id=85 for some advice on different imaging methods.

You will at the very least need a Canon EOS T-Ring to connect to your camera body (without lens). Then if you want to photograph at prime focus you need a 2" T-adapter. That connects to the T-ring and slips into the focuser. The focuser needs to be low profile or you won't reach focus. Normally telescopes suitable for photography require extension tubes when used visually.

The above is prime focus photography and your telescope is a 1200mm f4.7 prime lens. The advice on the Tele Vue site mentions other methods. Eyepiece projection is possible with another adaptor to hold the eyepiece in place, (still no camera lens). Afocal is with camera lens attached also known as digiscoping. Note your f ratio and effective focal length increases significantly with eyepiece projection and exposure times increase too. The best method for capturing planets is with video and software that selects the sharpest frames and stacks them together. Deep sky is best at prime focus. Note without a proper equatorial mount you will get field rotation that is noticeable at longer exposures.

Your 5mm eyepiece will be good on only the nights of best seeing. You may want to complement it with something around 7-8mm.

Enjoy!
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Old 14-07-2018, 09:48 PM
bluesilver (Peter)
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Thanks for the pick up on that link Malcom, i posted the wrong one somehow there, sorry about that.
Also thanks for the link astro744, will have to read that a few times.
Haven't yet been able to find a T-Adapter yet for some reason, must be looking at them but not actually knowing what i am looking at i guess.

I think i will end up with more eye pieces when i get going with it for sure, i am thinking i should of got a decent Barlow X2 lens, might get one when i sort out what to get for mounting the camera.
I have a bit more information now to head back off to do a bit more research.
Really appreciate it, also if anyone dose know of a place where i can get this T-Adaptor it would be greatly appreciated.
I am guessing it is going to be very obvious, but still learning sorry.
Thanks.
Peter.
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  #5  
Old 15-07-2018, 07:09 AM
astro744
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T-Adapter suitable for 2" focuser

https://www.bintel.com.au/product/bi...dapter-2-inch/


T-Ring (choose one suitable for your camera body mount)

https://www.bintel.com.au/product/t-rings-dslrs/


Some also here http://www.andrewscom.com.au/optical-telescopes

There are many other vendors that you may prefer to deal with. Just search 'T-adapters in Australia'

Note your Skywatcher may already come with a proprietary adaptor that simply replaces the upper end of your focuser draw tube. (Don't quote me on that though I just know that Skywatcher is a little different to others on the market). This proprietary adapter will be shorter and have a thread on one end. This thread is the T-thread and if you have this you don't need the T-adapter, only the T-ring.

To reach focus the camera needs to be racked in more than for visual. It's important that the focuser can be adapted to provide this or is of a low profile design in which case extension tubes are used for visual.
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Old 15-07-2018, 08:52 AM
bluesilver (Peter)
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Thanks heaps for those links, I now know what i was suppose to be looking for,
I will do a bit more research up on them now, I have heard of some people putting Barlow X2 lens on them also,
Plenty more to learn.
Thanks heaps,
Appreciated.
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  #7  
Old 15-07-2018, 10:39 AM
astro744
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The purpose of the Barlow would be to increase image scale. A 2x will double your focal length and focal ratio but also considerably increase your exposure time. It is useful for say the Moon on a full frame camera. It is also useful on say an SCT for planetary imaging with a small sensor CCD or CMOS imaging camera taking many frames per second.

Normally at 1200mm focal length the 0.5 deg. Moon will give you a 10.5mm image on the sensor. A 2x Barlow will increase that to 21mm which fits nicely inside the 24mm short sde of a full frame sensor.

Note if you are contemplating imaging a 2x Barlow is fine but a better method is with a 2x Powermate and although you can use it as a standard Barlow with standard T-adapter the Powermate has an optional T adapter that is a better match for it to provide the correct amplification factor.

See http://www.televue.com/engine/TV3b_p...d=123&Tab=_con

and http://www.televue.com/engine/TV3b_p...d=123&Tab=_app

and http://www.televue.com/engine/TV3b_p...d=123&Tab=_acc

Note you may also want to consider a wide aperture T-ring and T-adapter to avoid vignetting with full frame sensors. (A standard one will work fine if you want to experiment first).

See also https://www.telescopeadapters.com/

specifically https://www.telescopeadapters.com/94...format-t-rings and true ultra wide is https://www.telescopeadapters.com/89...ters-for-canon This last one has integrated T-ring and saves about 10mm focus distance required. This would be for prime focus use and not with the Powermates for which I recommend their own T-ring adapter. Lots to choose from.

Enjoy!
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  #8  
Old 15-07-2018, 04:59 PM
bluesilver (Peter)
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Thanks again for the information.
I have had of the powermates, just didn't know what they were, so kind of just glanced over them, I will have to go back now and do some research on them as well.
Sounds like they might be the better option from what you are saying.
Plus being able to use them also as a Barlow is a plus as well.
Never even though of the wide aperture T-ring and T-adapter, another bonus of asking questions i guess, Very much appreciate it.
Will definitely have to sit down now and go through a few things,
I appreciate all the inputs, Helps to guide me in the right direction.
Thanks heaps.
Peter.
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  #9  
Old 15-07-2018, 05:12 PM
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Merlin66 (Ken)
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Peter,
Softly, softly.......
don't spend any money unless you're 99% sure that it's worth it to you.

On my SW gear the 2" to 1.25" eyepiece adaptor comes with an external T thread which would fit any T2 camera adaptor.
Wait until yours arrive to see if this is the case with your gear.......
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Old 16-07-2018, 08:51 AM
bluesilver (Peter)
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Appreciate the advice,
Yes, not actually going to get anything as of yet, I am just at the moment doing a bit of research up on all the options.
But do appreciate the advice for sure,
Very much appreciated.
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Old 17-07-2018, 11:58 PM
TwistedRider (Drew)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merlin66 View Post
Peter,
Softly, softly.......
don't spend any money unless you're 99% sure that it's worth it to you.

On my SW gear the 2" to 1.25" eyepiece adaptor comes with an external T thread which would fit any T2 camera adaptor.
Wait until yours arrive to see if this is the case with your gear.......

This is good to know, I'm also likely to be wanting to take some photos at some stage. Will have to look at what my shiny new Dob has to support such endeavours
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Old 18-07-2018, 05:58 AM
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skysurfer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by astro744 View Post
Have a look at http://www.televue.com/engine/TV3b_p...n=Advice&id=85 for some advice on different imaging methods.

You will at the very least need a Canon EOS T-Ring to connect to your camera body (without lens). Then if you want to photograph at prime focus you need a 2" T-adapter. That connects to the T-ring and slips into the focuser.
On a full frame 5DSR this will vignette. Use a 48mm adapter which I use for my 6D.
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Old 18-07-2018, 11:18 PM
astro744
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skysurfer View Post
On a full frame 5DSR this will vignette. Use a 48mm adapter which I use for my 6D.
Yes I mentioned vignetting and some wider options in my previous reply. A standard one will get the OP started and that is what I used on my Nikon FE2 many years ago. I did eventually upgrade to a special focuser from Tectron that had a very wide draw tube and very thin T-ring.
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Old 19-07-2018, 01:58 PM
bluesilver (Peter)
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Thanks again for all the information. appreciated.
Lots there and still lots to learn.
I might actually be researching a bit too far in front of myself now.
The scope isn't due to arrive until mid next week now,
But appreciate all the information provided on here.
Thanks.
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Old 19-07-2018, 04:16 PM
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Allan_L (Allan)
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As mentioned earlier by Merlin,
The normal SW eyepiece adaptor unscrews and you can attach you Canon T Ring directly to the focus tube. This is the same on mine. But mine is not the current model. (read parallel import). so may work on yours

This method does not involve eyepieces, barlows or camera lens. The telescope is your lens.

You can alternatively buy another type of adaptor (projection adapter) that will slide into the 1.25 eyepiece adaptor and facilitate an eyepiece. Presumably if it slips into an 1.25 eyepiece focuser, it will also slip into a barlow. But don't quote me on that.

Sorry, I only know enough to be dangerous.

Good luck and let us know how you go.
I suspect there is a whole bunch of SW owners who may want to do something similar.
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Old 19-07-2018, 05:33 PM
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Allan_L (Allan)
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Just to clarify:
The 1.25 adapter barrel screws off leaving a thread that accommodates the T-Thread which attaches directly to the camera.

Being inspired, I tried it for myself and produced this (see attachment)
my first ever Astro photo with my DOB
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (IMGP0629 (Medium).JPG)
104.2 KB28 views
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Old 20-07-2018, 02:12 PM
bluesilver (Peter)
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Hi Allan, Nothing at all wrong with that photo, well done.
Yes it all make sense to me, at least i think it dose.
When i get everything here and up and running plus get use to it, i will let you know how things go with the camera setup.
SW looks to be a fairly popular unit with the amount.
Thanks.
Peter.
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  #18  
Old 25-08-2018, 09:39 PM
bluesilver (Peter)
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Hi, sorry about bringing up this old post,
I did mention a while ago that o would let you know how i went with the camera attachment to the 10 inch Dobsonian.
In the end i ended up making my own attachment.
Basically i have the Canon T-ring, then i made my own T- adaptor
This got me the photo of the Moon, below is the attachments i used.
Then i use a barlow to get photos of the planets but not used for the moon, I am sure there are better photos out there, but this is done straight off the camera, no work editing or anything, no tracking, just lined up and photo taken,
So with a bit of tracking and the like you should be able to get good images with this sort of setup.
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (Moon1.jpg)
183.4 KB20 views
Click for full-size image (lens1.jpg)
191.9 KB14 views
Click for full-size image (lens2.jpg)
172.5 KB13 views
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