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Old 05-09-2009, 09:44 PM
Hans Tucker (Hans)
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DSLR vs CCD

Ok this topic may have been covered in depth before so apologies for ressurecting it yet again.

Would using a DSLR camera be a better option to start off with rather than jumping straight in to using a mono CCD camera for deep sky imaging. I notice the majority in the deep sky folder use DSLR and only a few have posted images taken with dedicated CCD cameras

Has anyone done the transition from DSLR to dedicated mono CCD and if so did your time with the DSLR aid your transition to mono CCD. I am thinking that I have gone in to advanced to soon and maybe I should step back and work on image capture and processing with a DSLR before going back to mono CCD.
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Old 05-09-2009, 10:36 PM
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Simple answer is "Yes".
A good way to start is to start on a DSLR. A cheap modded DSLR goes for around 300 bucks or so, and gives you a nice wide sensor, and good sensitivity. Noise is your only issue, but its livable with.

Once you gain some experience, you can move to the area that best suites your purse and needs, Mono (LRGB), or one shot color.

Theo.
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Old 06-09-2009, 08:43 PM
Hagar (Doug)
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I have to agree with Theo on this question. The DSLR is in a lot of ways much easier to master than making the big step to a dedicated CCD. I for one started with a DSLR and made the step to a cooled CCD only to find it much harder to get respectable images with the CCD.
The DSLR is a wonderful learning tool to get you started on the long and at times baffling world of image processing. The images come out of a DSLR with some initial processing carried out by the internal software of the DSLR. But at this point there is still buckets full to learn.
The CCD while employing a similar sensor for capture can at times leave you wanting with the initial image and what you have learned with the DSLR stands you well to move up.

I started with a DSLR, moved on to a one shot colour CCD and then on to a mono CCD with filters only to find I was much happier with the OSC camera and since have sold the mono in favor for the OSC.
Maybe in the future I will again make the move to mono but only when my commitments allow more time to be put into the capture with the mono.
Some find the transition a breeze but I most certainly didn't for various reasons. There are gains to be made in each step but for me the gains weren't worth the effort.

Each to his own.
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Old 09-09-2009, 09:13 PM
Hans Tucker (Hans)
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Thanks all for the reply. Selecting a DSLR camera is just as complicated as selecting a CCD camera, the choices are endless...30D, 350D, 40D, 50D, 500D, 5D...and these are just the Canon range...then there is Nikon.

I even considered having the KAI-2020 sensor in my ST-2000XM replaced with a KAI-4022 turning it into an ST-4000XCM..but since ATS hasn't answered my e-mail regarding this so I have given up on this option.

Does the clip in filters for EOS cameras available from Astronomik give the same results as a modified DSLR? I have found an EOS-450D un-modified for a good price and was thinking about the Astronomik clip in filter option.
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Old 09-09-2009, 09:31 PM
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mill (Martin)
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Get an Canon and modify it.
Unmodified the filters have no use.
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Old 09-09-2009, 09:47 PM
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MrB (Simon)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans Tucker View Post
Does the clip in filters for EOS cameras available from Astronomik give the same results as a modified DSLR? I have found an EOS-450D un-modified for a good price and was thinking about the Astronomik clip in filter option.
Unfortunately, No. The OEM filter cuts the Ha response.
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Old 13-09-2009, 04:59 PM
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wysiwyg (Mark)
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I transitioned from a cooled modded DSLR to mono CCD, and I must say, that these two are not that far different. The principles are exactly the same, each have their pros and con's and the biggest difference is the price.

Yes, I learnt a lot using the DSLR first, but I dont think diving into CCD is that much more daunting , each pose their own difficulties not just in acquisition, but the right choice of software, equipment and processing techniques.

I guess its easy to say this in hindseit, but if I had my time again I would have gone straight into CCD mono imaging, would have saved quite a few bucks as well.

Mark
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Old 13-09-2009, 07:28 PM
Hans Tucker (Hans)
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Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
I guess its easy to say this in hindseit, but if I had my time again I would have gone straight into CCD mono imaging, would have saved quite a few bucks as well.

Mark
Thanks for your input Mark. I have since discovered a problem with the ST-2000XM camera I was using which is getting sorted out. This problem had me running all over the place questioning whether I picked my targets correctly and thinking (incorrectly) that there are easy (beginners) and hard objects to image. I have also found my elusive Mandel adapter for Nikkor lenses which will allow me to use a Nikon DSLR lens on my SBIG camera when I get it back so I can do some wide field imaging. I will also sell my Astrodon 'E' series LRGB filters and buy a set of Baader filters which are better suited to the Interline sensor in the ST-2000XM. After the discovering the problem with the ST-2000XM camera I have a renewed interest and have decided to give mono CCD imaging another go.
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Old 13-09-2009, 07:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Hans Tucker View Post
After the discovering the problem with the ST-2000XM camera I have a renewed interest and have decided to give mono CCD imaging another go.
Hans,

Glad to hear you got the problem sorted. There is nothing worse when you hav a new toy to play with and you just cannot get it working properly, either because you might miss something very obvious or its faulty. In my experience, its mostly been because I have missed something.

The CCD path will reward you well, just some patience and clear skies will do the trick!

Good Luck!
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Old 13-09-2009, 08:06 PM
Hans Tucker (Hans)
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Originally Posted by wysiwyg View Post
Hans,

The CCD path will reward you well, just some patience and clear skies will do the trick!

Good Luck!
I live in Melbourne....I can't even get a lousy 5 minute window of opportunity to view the ISS passing over let alone a good period to capture some worth while data...god I wish I was back in Perth.

Last edited by Hans Tucker; 13-09-2009 at 08:58 PM.
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Old 14-09-2009, 04:08 PM
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I'd consider myself a bigginer astophotography and I have both a ccd (Meade DSI2) and a dslr (canon 1000d unmodded). The DSLR is much easier to get an image out of, to be hounest I've yet to get anything decent our the the DSI 2. Focusing a CCD is the biggest hurdle because it's not live, theres always a lag from what you see from what you did, if that makes sence. If you get a DSLR with with live view on it, when you turn the focuser you see your image change instantly.

As a result I only use my DSI for guiding.
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Old 14-09-2009, 04:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Hans Tucker View Post
I live in Melbourne....I can't even get a lousy 5 minute window of opportunity to view the ISS passing over let alone a good period to capture some worth while data...god I wish I was back in Perth.
I don't think you would be very happy with Perth weather over the last 3 months, with so many UK migrants here I think they have reached critical mass and brought their weather patterns with them
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