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Old 05-04-2021, 05:33 AM
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Astrofriend (Lars)
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3D-print: EQ6 Pad

If you have a EQ6 mount as I do you maybe noticed that the bottom of it is not flat. If you want to install it on a pier you must have something between the EQ6 mount and the pier. I started with one made of wood and planned to replace it with one made of aluminum. But now when I have a 3D-printer, can it be made of plastic and still be stiff enough ?

Curious as I'm I have to do a test:
http://www.astrofriend.eu/3d-printin...1-eq6-pad.html

Still printing.

Lars
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Old 05-04-2021, 10:48 PM
Saturnine (Jeff)
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Hi Lars

I understand the benefits of having a 3D printer and the versatility they bring to designing bits and pieces but in the case of the spacer between the EQ mount and the plate , wouldn't it be just as practicable to find a local machine shop and have them machine one on a lathe or milling machine from either steel or aluminium or Delrin.
But I have to admit that being a tinkerer and having made lots of bits and pieces that there is some satisfaction to doing the work yourself.
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Old 06-04-2021, 04:36 PM
TrevorW
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Don't overestimate the rigidity of 3d printed plastic
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Old 07-04-2021, 03:01 AM
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Astrofriend (Lars)
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In this case the pad is squized between to metal plates. It's not rubber, maybe work. Interesting to know for the future were the limit is for what plastic can be used for.

It cost me 4 Euro in material to print it, if I had let a workshop make the pad in metal it had cost at least 40 Euro, and it had been of much simpler shape. The weight of plastic material is much lower and it don't rust either :-)

Some updates:
http://www.astrofriend.eu/3d-printin...1-eq6-pad.html

/Lars
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Old 07-04-2021, 04:58 PM
TrevorW
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This may be of interest


https://www.researchgate.net/publica...in_FDM_Process
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Old Yesterday, 05:33 AM
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Astroman (Andrew Wall)
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Although it might initially work, I think over time and various atmospheric conditions the plastic (depending on what you use) may deteriorate and possibly delaminate. You may be better off getting someone with a lathe to turn one up for you. I did that for my HEQ5Pro, just turned up some scrap mild steel billet, 10 years strong and still going.

Having said that it's an interesting project and I would recommend you giving it a go, but check it carefully. Maybe I can be proven wrong In that design there are many holes in it, I would remove them and increase the layer thickness to about 5mm or so with as much infill as you can. Experiment on different layer thicknesses and infill.

Please keep us informed of your progress. I have been thinking about getting a 3d printer for a while now. What Printer do you have?
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