ICEINSPACE
Most Read Articles
Moon Phase
CURRENT MOON Waxing Crescent
8.5%
The Sun Now
Time Zones
Sydney*
12:52 am
Perth
9:52 pm
Auckland*
2:52 am
New York
8:52 am
Paris
2:52 pm
GMT
1:52 pm




  #1  
Old 12-05-2017, 08:00 PM
Herbie (Peter)
Registered User

Herbie is offline
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Poochera South Australia
Posts: 10
Eyepieces

Hi all I'm new to this site and I have a question that you've no doubt heard many times before I have just bought a Skywatcher 150/750 f5 and I am looking for new eyepieces there's so many different brands types it's sending me bonkers.

I've been looking at Baader Hyperion there's a lot of good reviews on them and just wondering if any of you have an option on them or point me to another brand for around the same price and quality any help will be greatly appreciated
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 13-05-2017, 12:16 AM
AEAJR (Ed)
Registered User

AEAJR is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 348
Eyepieces: A strategy to execute over time


I have spent the last two years trying and buying and looking through other people’s eyepieces and barlows in a wide range of telescopes. Mine range from 50 mm to 203 mm aperture, 350 mm FL to 1900 mm FL across refractor, Newtonian and Mak. I have looked through but never owned an SCT. I have come to the following approach for your consideration.


1 or 2 low power wide field eyepieces (30 to 40 mm for 2" or 32 mm Plossl for 1.25" )

Zoom for the midrange - 24 to 8 mm (Zoom is my most used eyepiece in all of my telescopes)

Barlowed zoom for the high range adding some single wide field eyepieces over time if the need is there.

Wide AFOV, over 60 degrees, are helpful in manual tracking scopes but may be a luxury in GoTo and motorized tracking scopes. They add a nice context but if the scope is tracking you don't need the wide field to assist in tracking.


Zoom – My most used eyepiece
- Note that one zoom can replace 3-5 other eyepieces so take that into account when you look at prices.
Note that I am in the USA so pricing shown is $US from US sources.


Higher Budget – If you tend to buy eyepieces over $150 each then consider the highly recommend and highly praised Baader Hyperion Mark IV Click Stop 8-24 Zoom. $280 or $380 with matching barlow. This would likely be your most used eyepiece. This is a very high quality eyepiece. I have links to discussion where people have stopped using their single FL eyepieces and just use this one. I have the earlier version.
http://agenaastro.com/baader-8-24mm-...e-2454826.html


Lower Budget - If you tend to buy eyepieces $80 or lower then consider the Celestron 8-24 Zoom. $60 – Good quality and very versatile. Not as good as the Baader but about 1/4 the price for the more budget minded astronomer. I have the Celestron too.
http://agenaastro.com/celestron-8-24...-eyepiece.html


I never expected the zoom eyepiece to become my primary eyepiece, but it has.

* The Celestron is good and comparable to my Plossl eyepieces but the Baader Hyperion is great and comparable to my Explore Scientific eyepieces
Watching doubles split as I rotate the barrel is wonderful
One filter serves over a wide range of magnifications, no screwing and unscrewing to try other eyepieces

* The Baader is a 1.25" zoom but it has its own 2" removable collar so, in my XT8i 2” focuser I can move from my 2" low power eyepieces to the zoom and a wide range of magnifications without playing with adapters.

* Moving smoothly from and between small changes in magnification helps when seeing is not the best.

* Sharing the view with others is easier, especially in my manual tracking Dob. I can hand it over at low mag so it stays in the view longer, and then have them zoom back in to whatever magnification works best for them rather than for me.

* Kids love the zoom

* My eyepiece case has been greatly simplified


There are some who reject this and that is fine. Everyone gets to enjoy the hobby as they wish. Some have call me lazy and that is fine, but I can do things with the zoom that I can not do with single FL eyepieces. For example I can split a double star and actually watch it split as I turn the barrel. You can't do that with single FL eyepieces at any price.

I find the zoom leaves me more time to focus on the target and less time fussing with eyepieces.


Just some ideas. If you just spent a bunch of money on a new scope, eyepieces will likely be your next additions. This is an approach that gets you the most coverage at the lowest cost. Naturally, over time you may want a special eyepiece here or there but this is your basic set. Low power wide view, zoom, barlow, and maybe a couple of short FL wide view which can be added later.

Of course, your smileage will vary.


zoom eyepiece review – Includes the Celestron zoom
http://www.chuckhawks.com/comparison_zoom_eyepieces.htm

Baader Hyperian Mark III Clickstop zoom review
http://www.weasner.com/co/Reviews/20...ece/index.html

Last edited by AEAJR; 13-05-2017 at 06:09 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 13-05-2017, 06:04 AM
Benjamin's Avatar
Benjamin (Ben)
Registered User

Benjamin is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Moorooka, Brisbane
Posts: 193
It can be confusing so perhaps the best solution is see if you can get to a star party of some sort (a local meeting of an astronomy group). Then politely ask to try some of their stuff :-) If that doesn't work take a leap. Eyepieces are sold and traded here a lot so, given you know what's generally a good eyepiece (your research will give you that info I'm sure), go for it. My advice is don't necessarily try to fill gaps in the line up but upgrade the magnifications you like or use most. This depends on your interests: splitting doubles, planets/moon, DSO hunting, star fields. Look for exit pupils that match (around 1mm for planets, 2mm for high power DSO, and 3mm to 5mm for low power DSO say). In your scope something like a 4-5mm for higher powers, 10mm for higher power DSO and 18mm and up for lower powers. If your mount tracks you don't necessarily need a huge field of view, but lots of folks like the immersive quality of theses eyepieces (anything from 68 to 100), and if your mount doesn't track the larger field of view can mean less nudging of the scope. A Zoom is great, but not necessarily everyone's cup of tea. Other factors include eye relief (particularly if you wear glasses while observing) and how well an eyepiece is corrected for abberations in the type and speed of scope you have. An f5 reflector will exaggerate some common flaws to a degree and the Televues, Pentax XWs, Vixen LVWs and the cheaper Explore Scientifics are built to minimize some of these effects (there are doubtless others too but these I have looked through). The Explore Scientifics were my first upgrade when dollar values were better and I was very happy with them. However if I had gone to a dark site more often I wouldn't have upgraded so quickly A dark sky with a any reasonable eyepiece will show heaps more than a fantastic eyepiece in light pollution.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 13-05-2017, 08:59 AM
Camelopardalis's Avatar
Camelopardalis (Dunk)
Drifting from the pole

Camelopardalis is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 3,917
Welcome to Ice in Space, Peter!

My advice is to keep your budget low...try a few different inexpensive eyepieces until you find ones that you like the view from with your scope and eyes. More expensive eyepieces are often a case of diminishing returns, and it's a very slippery slope
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 13-05-2017, 11:54 AM
coltpeacemaker (Nathan)
Registered User

coltpeacemaker is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: perth
Posts: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herbie View Post
Hi all I'm new to this site and I have a question that you've no doubt heard many times before I have just bought a Skywatcher 150/750 f5 and I am looking for new eyepieces there's so many different brands types it's sending me bonkers.

I've been looking at Baader Hyperion there's a lot of good reviews on them and just wondering if any of you have an option on them or point me to another brand for around the same price and quality any help will be greatly appreciated
I've just bought the Baader Hyperion 21mm eyepiece and for the price it's fantastic! I've been using it on star clusters and I highly recommend it!
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (IMG_0049.JPG)
141.3 KB11 views
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 13-05-2017, 05:25 PM
Herbie (Peter)
Registered User

Herbie is offline
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Poochera South Australia
Posts: 10
Hi thank you all for your info and opinions it's appreciated.

I live 700km west of Adelaide so there's no light pollution out here only the starry sky's above, as I'm so far from anything the closest astronomy club is about 2-3 hours away or Adelaide honestly I don't know anyone else that has telescops and uses them on a regular basis out here.

My scope isn't tracking so I had been looking at the wider FOV eyepieces for that reason I like the idea of the zoom's and they have good reviews too.

My daughters had there first veiw at the planets and the moon the other night and i couldn't get a go myself until MKR came on then I had it all to myself

Cheers everyone happy nights👍
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 13-05-2017, 06:33 PM
raymo
Registered User

raymo is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: margaret river, western australia
Posts: 3,929
Get a Celestron [or Seben ] 8-24mm zoom, a ripper of an eyepiece
for the price, [about $60-70 ].
raymo
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 19-05-2017, 07:57 PM
seedy (Chris)
Registered User

seedy is offline
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Cannon Hill
Posts: 5
I own far too many eye pieces.
My most used one is my Baader Hyperion Mark IV Click Stop 8-24 Zoom.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 19-05-2017, 10:43 PM
AEAJR (Ed)
Registered User

AEAJR is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Posts: 348
Quote:
Originally Posted by seedy View Post
I own far too many eye pieces.
My most used one is my Baader Hyperion Mark IV Click Stop 8-24 Zoom.
Could not have said it better myself.



Some key benefits of using a Zoom

* Watching doubles split as you rotate the barrel is wonderful - You and the kids can actually watch a double turn into a double or a tripple as each one becomes visable as you turn the barrel.

* One filter serves over a wide range of magnifications, no screwing and unscrewing to try other eyepieces

* Moving smoothly from and between small changes in magnification helps when seeing is not the best

* Sharing the view with others is easier, especially in a manual tracking telescope - you can hand it over at low mag so it stays in the view longer, and then have them zoom back in to whatever magnification works best for them.

* Kids love the zoom


Eyepiece selection is easy! Wide field low power? zoom? zoom + barlow?

3 pieces of glass and you have it all covered. If you want you can add something more later.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 24-05-2017, 01:00 PM
sil
Registered User

sil is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Canberra
Posts: 855
Quote:
Originally Posted by seedy View Post
I own far too many eye pieces.
My most used one is my Baader Hyperion Mark IV Click Stop 8-24 Zoom.
This is the Eyepiece you are looking for. You are wasting money going with anything less.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 11:52 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Tasco Australia
Advertisement
SkyWatcher Star Discovery
Advertisement
FLI Cameras and Imaging Accessories
Advertisement
Meade Instruments
Advertisement
OzScopes Authorised Dealer
Advertisement
Atik 16200
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement