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Old 13-11-2016, 03:51 PM
Sol-Skysailor (Sol)
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3D? Super Mars by citizen experiment

Hi Markus and All,

Thought I'd shift this to a new thread to leave the moon experiment progress.

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Originally Posted by Stonius View Post

Anything should work, as long as you can get a different view in the left and right eyes. You could even use the rotation of a planet or the sun as a means to fake 3D. Terrestrial planets may work better as the rotation on gas bodies is differential between the poles and the equator, but how much of a difference that makes remains to be seen. Anyone want to send me some data? Any images with around 5 degrees or rotation between pics?
http://www.mars.dti.ne.jp/~cmo/ISMO.html Would this give some materials for you?

And in particular the super Mars http://www.kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~cmo...6/f_image.html

Am curious whether Mars atmosphere will hinder the 3D effects very much.

Cheers
Sol
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Old 13-11-2016, 07:22 PM
Sol-Skysailor (Sol)
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Found this on APOD

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160520.html APOD_ 2016 May 20 - 3D Mercury Transit

Marvellous 3D!! Floats right out. And, Markus, I can see your 3D view of the moon in the same way! Wowww.. Thank you. The sun clips through fast though, so by the time I could see 3D it blinked out.

All these must mean there could be loads of things that can become 3D. Can you do Saturn? What targets possible with Earth orbital parallax?

(Yes, maybe lots of people already know all these but it's fun to explore anyway.)

Cheers
Sol
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Old 13-11-2016, 11:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sol-Skysailor View Post
Found this on APOD

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap160520.html APOD_ 2016 May 20 - 3D Mercury Transit

Marvellous 3D!! Floats right out. And, Markus, I can see your 3D view of the moon in the same way! Wowww.. Thank you. The sun clips through fast though, so by the time I could see 3D it blinked out.

All these must mean there could be loads of things that can become 3D. Can you do Saturn? What targets possible with Earth orbital parallax?

(Yes, maybe lots of people already know all these but it's fun to explore anyway.)

Cheers
Sol
Wow, that transit is an excellent use of 3D! Amazing to see it floating in front of the sun. Gives you a real sense of scale. Nice find!

Yes, sorry, the sun thing was just a little experiment. I could have done longer, but...time and resources. Besides the youtube codec munched the details which are needed for a good 3D effect. Not quite sure the best way to append video to posts here, it's not really set up for it.

I've already done a 3D test with a mars video, but the data is not mine, so I'm asking permission of the original owner. The data you showed me would work, if I could capture it. Pity it's not a full rotation.

As far as possible targets, Saturn is a bit featureless. the rotation method is unlikely to provide enough eye - to eye difference to give good 3D (unless there is a storm or some prominent feature) And it changes phase so slowly. You may find that you get better 3D by waiting a week or two. Presuming the actual planet looks the same, you would be using part of the earth's orbit round the sun to get a slightly different illumination angle, which you could pass off as 3D.

Essentially, the moon is close enough to get good data using the earth's rotation as a baseline for the parallax..

Mars works if you just leave it a few hours to rotate a bit. Likewise with the sun and, I imagine, with Jupiter.

Saturn you'd have to use the orbit of the earth to get enough shift, I think.

I like the idea of capturing conjunctions like this. Like Saturn with the moon as happened a while back, or, if you are quick, the ISS skimming over the moon. The baseline for this would be shorter in accordance with the useful width of the satellite track on the earth's surface.

It did occur to me that you could use the earth's orbit as a baseline to try and image objects further out, but I don't think it would work. The moon is about 30 earth diameters away from us here, but when you compare the diameter of the earth's orbit to the distance to even our closest star, the ratio is more like 300,000 times. I know they do use this system to measure our stellar neighbours, but I'm guessing they are using extremely high magnification and observing sub-pixel shifts, which are not going to result in much 3D for visual purposes. Happy to be proven wrong though, if anyone has some data to play with. :-) It might work for comets though, or showing the parallax of the outer planets against the background of the stars.

Cheers

Markus
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Old 14-11-2016, 10:02 AM
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Quote:
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I've already done a 3D test with a mars video, but the data is not mine
Managed to find some data over at NASA's JPL.

Here's Mars in 3D :-)

https://youtu.be/jA-qIRYW4BI

As with all these things, it'll look more 3D if there's a background of stars, or a foreground object, such as phobos or deimos.

Cheers

Markus
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Old 14-11-2016, 05:07 PM
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Markus,

That is so cool! That’s exactly… what… perfect!
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Old 14-11-2016, 06:38 PM
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Quote:
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Markus,

That is so cool! That’s exactly… what… perfect!
Aw thanks! If I get a chance I'll make it a little bit cooler so you can see what I mean about the layers thing :-)
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Old 15-11-2016, 09:32 PM
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Okay, I put together a Mars visualisation so you can see what I mean. Same deal - Mars rotating, but you'll see it's much more 3D. Having the context of the stars behind is a huge help because it gives the 3D some context, as does the little Phobos zooming around. The more objects you can put in there at different depths, the better it looks.

https://www.youtube.com/v/ngEOFR3ykZ...st=ngEOFR3ykZA

Cheers

Markus
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Old 17-11-2016, 08:19 PM
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Absolutely marvellous! Mesmerisingly beautiful. Couldn’t help reaching out to hold it midair.

Fell in love with zooming Phobos. 'elp!

And it's addictive! Now I worry about not being able to uncross my starry eyes → ←
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Old 17-11-2016, 10:05 PM
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:-) No worries. Let me know if you need any help putting your own 3D shots together. Are you still trying to get people to do the moon in 3D at different locations at the same time? Some interesting things to try would be the moon at a young phase with a lovely cratery limb, or even some close-up work?

Maybe put the word out on Cloudy nights? I think most ppl here tend to be aussies, which limits your baseline. Happy to help with this project if desired. :-)

Cheers

Markus
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