#361  
Old 20-05-2007, 04:30 PM
erick's Avatar
erick (Eric)
Starcatcher

erick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Shoalhaven Heads
Posts: 8,479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petzza View Post
Thanks erick, the eyepieces I have, or borrowed, I should say are Tele-Vu, I think thats spelt correctly, and a 2X barlow tube all made in Japan as they are a few years old. I have been told thats a very good brand. I'm still interested to know if if there's any difference in the optical quality, like the primary mirrors, between a Skywatcher / Saxon and a Bintel / GSO.
Sorry, away for a couple of days. We need the eyepiece experts to step in and advise, but, depending on which range of Tele Vue eyepieces, they should be good, and, I would expect, better than the basic plossl eyepieces that will come standard with an 8" or 10" dob from most suppliers. Talk to your potential telescope suppliers - some will be really helpful. try to get to a viewing night of a club - you'll learn a lot and will be able to see for yourself what the differences are.
Reply With Quote
  #362  
Old 25-05-2007, 10:22 PM
Tiger74's Avatar
Tiger74
Did you just moon me?

Tiger74 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 3
I can't get the scope to balance - is there a secret to it?

Getting it to balance is annoying me....!

Last edited by xstream; 26-05-2007 at 02:32 AM. Reason: removed offensive language
Reply With Quote
  #363  
Old 26-05-2007, 01:06 AM
erick's Avatar
erick (Eric)
Starcatcher

erick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Shoalhaven Heads
Posts: 8,479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger74 View Post
I can't get the scope to balance - is there a secret to it?

Getting it to balance is annoying me....!
Need more information please, Tiger 74. My guess is that you are talking a dobsonian reflector? Doesn't balance under some conditions?? under any conditions?? With OTA horizontal? vertical?? 45 deg?? What's up top - finderscope, focuser, anything else? What is in the focuser - eyepiece, barlow? Are there friction springs on the altitude bearings? Or some other form of tensioner?

Last edited by xstream; 26-05-2007 at 02:34 AM. Reason: removed offensive language from quote
Reply With Quote
  #364  
Old 03-06-2007, 03:18 PM
Shaun
Registered User

Shaun is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Kellerberrin ,WA
Posts: 175
Couple of questions, do i have to use the tension springs on the Dob it moves better without them and balences ok?

I tried the milkbottle idea i read about and it moves a lot easier now, i do have a plastic type washer there already so if i put more than 1 bottle washer i get to much rocking, is it normal to have the plastic washers there i have read some people use 4 or 5 bottle washers?

My Dob has like a dust cover on the top with a small cap on it about 2.5" round that can be removed any ideas what this cap is for?round
Reply With Quote
  #365  
Old 03-06-2007, 06:20 PM
iceman's Avatar
iceman (Mike)
Sir Post a Lot!

iceman is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Gosford, NSW, Australia
Posts: 36,712
Hi Shaun.

You don't *need* the tension springs. Most people take them off or just unclip them, but if you use a very heavy eyepiece down low on the horizon you might need the spring(s).

The small cap in the dust cover is to stop the aperture down - so instead of taking the whole dust cover off, you'll only take off the camp - so instead of a 12" f/5 telescope it would become a 2.5" f/25 or something. Honestly forget about it, you'll never use it.
Reply With Quote
  #366  
Old 03-06-2007, 07:02 PM
Jarrod
Professor Chaos

Jarrod is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Geelong
Posts: 196
hi, i just set up my newtonian scope outside, i roughly collimated it a few days ago. i noticed while looking at venus that there is a slight "trail" of light pionting down from the planet to the lower right of my view. it's only slight, a fraction the width of the planet itself. i pointed the scope at some random stars and all stars appear to be doubles. i don't want to touch any screws unless someone can tell me what the problem is.

thanks, jarrod.

BTW, i don't own any collimation tools yet, so i can only judge the collimation by eye.
Reply With Quote
  #367  
Old 03-06-2007, 07:48 PM
erick's Avatar
erick (Eric)
Starcatcher

erick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Shoalhaven Heads
Posts: 8,479
Don't be shy - adjust one of the primary mirror collimation (tilt) screws a little - say half a turn (monitor which way so you can restore it) and see what happens to the image. Better? Worse? no change? You'll be learning. But invest in some collimation tools soon. If nothing else, try the 35mm film container with a hole drilled in the centre of the end, or cap. That will fit into the 1.25" holder and allow you to better centre your viewing eye on the optical axis of the focusser.
Reply With Quote
  #368  
Old 03-06-2007, 08:48 PM
Jarrod
Professor Chaos

Jarrod is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Geelong
Posts: 196
thanks eric (or erick?), i adjusted the secondary a few minutes before i read your post but it worked. jupiter looks alot nicer when you can actually see the cloudbands, .

you will proberly find this a bit strange, but i've never seen mars through a telescope, what time will it be best to view it in the morning?

thanks, jarrod.
Reply With Quote
  #369  
Old 03-06-2007, 09:38 PM
erick's Avatar
erick (Eric)
Starcatcher

erick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Shoalhaven Heads
Posts: 8,479
Mars - not sure, I haven't been up early with the scope or binoculars for some months! However, check when Mike Salway has been taking his Mars photos (see threads) - that would be a good time. I just checked some details for tomorrow - look like Mars rises in Melbourne around 2:40am. Sunrise around 7:30am - so let's guess 6am would be a good time. Mars seems to be at an elevation of about 40 deg, NE at that time.
Reply With Quote
  #370  
Old 03-06-2007, 10:00 PM
Jarrod
Professor Chaos

Jarrod is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Geelong
Posts: 196
thanks, i'll set my alarm clock. a question regarding EQ mounts, is the RA axis meant to be set for the magnetic poles or celestial poles? my EQ mount works alright when in line with the magnetic poles, but should it be lined up with the celestial poles for best results. i dont worry about incredible accuracy so ive never looked into it.
Reply With Quote
  #371  
Old 03-06-2007, 10:24 PM
erick's Avatar
erick (Eric)
Starcatcher

erick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Shoalhaven Heads
Posts: 8,479
I know nothing about EQ mounts, but you certainly need to point to the South Celestial Pole, rather than South Magnetic Pole.

For Melbourne, the South Pole is 11 deg East of magnetic south. So, when facing towards magnetic south, the South Pole is 11 deg to the East (your left hand). (Sorry if that is too simplistic, but I keep forgetting it myself - is it to the left or to the right???).
Reply With Quote
  #372  
Old 03-06-2007, 10:30 PM
Jarrod
Professor Chaos

Jarrod is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Geelong
Posts: 196
thanks, i'll try that out.

i feel silly now .
Reply With Quote
  #373  
Old 03-06-2007, 10:33 PM
erick's Avatar
erick (Eric)
Starcatcher

erick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Shoalhaven Heads
Posts: 8,479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarrod View Post
i feel silly now .
join the club! we've all got stupid stories to tell - did I tell you about my finderscope where I've dropped the eyepiece lenses in a pile and don't know what orientation they should be in...................duh!
Reply With Quote
  #374  
Old 04-06-2007, 04:10 PM
Jarrod
Professor Chaos

Jarrod is offline
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Geelong
Posts: 196
yeah i read about that. we do learn from these experiences though, so a suppose that makes it worthwhile.
Reply With Quote
  #375  
Old 06-06-2007, 12:22 AM
flearosie
Registered User

flearosie is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: INVERLEIGH
Posts: 22
Total Novice!!

Hello

I am a total newbie to astronomy and quite green! I have purchased an 8" Skywatcher Dobsonian which came with the two standard eyepieces.I have bought a few magazines and am reading everything I can come across(so am now totally whacked with info I cant take in!).

I have been to an Astronomical Society a few times and they have been very friendly and helpful thus my purchasing this scope. I have had some spinal ops and find it hard to use the finderscope.I have looked at both the Telrad and the Red Dot Finder and would like to ask what would be the best one to buy? I have trouble bending my neck fully to the side so wondered if it was possible to buy a 90deg angled finder that I could look straight into??

I thought I would get comfortable at home for a couple of months and then venture back to the club.I would also like to ask how people adapt wheels etc to the base of the Dobs for ease of movement etc. as I have to get down stairs at home to take it out.

Sorry for the long epic,but any help would be very appreciated.

Cheers
Reply With Quote
  #376  
Old 06-06-2007, 09:34 AM
erick's Avatar
erick (Eric)
Starcatcher

erick is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Shoalhaven Heads
Posts: 8,479
Hi Flearosie - Welcome!

Yes, you can buy FinderScopes with a right angle at the eyepiece.

There are lots - look at Bintel's website under FinderScopes:-

https://www.bintelshop.com.au/welcome.htm

Both the Telrad and Red Dot finders don't solve the problem of having to get directly behind them to look at the sky.

Eric
Reply With Quote
  #377  
Old 06-06-2007, 11:27 AM
cahullian's Avatar
cahullian
Hapkido = Pain

cahullian is offline
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Newcastle NSW
Posts: 1,014
Hi flearosie
I have the same size scope as you and I just use a trolly bought from super cheat auto for $22.00 and I use luggage straps to hold it in place when im moving it around. I have a crook back and I find this way of transporting the scope around the yard or viewing site very easy.

Gazz
Reply With Quote
  #378  
Old 07-06-2007, 11:22 PM
flearosie
Registered User

flearosie is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: INVERLEIGH
Posts: 22
Hi Eric

Thanks so much for the info. I have looked at the Bintel site and they have 2 right angled finderscopes - their own 8x50 and an Orion 6x30mm both for the same price. Do I need to buy the new individual bracket for it or will the orig Skywatcher one adapt? I would rather save up and buy a better quality from the start,so just wondering if these are both ok quality?
Reply With Quote
  #379  
Old 07-06-2007, 11:38 PM
ballaratdragons's Avatar
ballaratdragons (Ken)
The 'DRAGON MAN'

ballaratdragons is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: In the Dark at Snake Valley, Victoria
Posts: 14,412
The Bintel marked 90 degree finder will fit straight into your finder bracket. Not sure about the Orion one, but you can ask Bintel. Plus the 8x50 finder is a good size for a finder.
Reply With Quote
  #380  
Old 09-06-2007, 01:24 PM
Universal's Avatar
Universal
Registered User

Universal is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Blackmans Bay, Tasmania
Posts: 3
Thumbs up

G'day!
I'm new to the site, and astronomy. Have been lurking on the site for a while and finally decided to post. I was looking to buy a telescope, but saw a lot of you recommending binoculars for a newbie as the first point of call in light gathering equipment.
I can tell you I'm not disappointed! I went out last night with my AOE 9x60 binoculars and was amazed to see stars which I couldn't see with the naked eye in suburban Melbourne.
Terrific site you have here.

Cheers,
Mark
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 06:20 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Testar
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Astromechanics
Advertisement
Lunatico Astronomical
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement