#1021  
Old 27-09-2010, 02:29 PM
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erick (Eric)
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Originally Posted by TheFacelessMen View Post

.... I ordered a takahashi mewlon 250 and takahashi em400 mount.
Nice!
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  #1022  
Old 27-09-2010, 02:44 PM
TheFacelessMen (Rob)
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Nice!



Now all i need is some advice on aligning the darn mount and ota properly
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  #1023  
Old 27-09-2010, 02:55 PM
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erick (Eric)
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Are you planning visual or photography (or both), Rob?
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  #1024  
Old 27-09-2010, 03:01 PM
TheFacelessMen (Rob)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erick View Post
Are you planning visual or photography (or both), Rob?
Hi Erick,

Mainly continuing primarily with visual but getting into a little bit of astrophotography which is why I spent a little more money on the mount.

I hope to buy a second hand or new CCD when I can affort the extra dollars.
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  #1025  
Old 27-09-2010, 08:06 PM
flyingbaby (Allan Chan)
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I am new and need someone to help me... all about astronomy... in Perth, WA.... Not sure if anyone can kindly help me...
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  #1026  
Old 28-09-2010, 03:36 AM
TerryM (Terry)
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Hey guys,

have never looked through a telescope but am very eager to get involved. i would like some advice on selecting a telescope, my price range would be up to $1500, at the moment i only want to do visual but later down the track maybe a little photography.
Any help would be much appreciated.

Thanks
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  #1027  
Old 28-09-2010, 03:55 AM
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bartman (Bart)
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Hi Terry and Allan,
Welcome to IIS !http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/....elcomesign.gif
I'm still relativley new to astronomy but I can tell you you have come to the right place!
Have a look through this thread ( or do a search) and you will find lots of posts regarding " what telescope to buy for X amount of dollars".
As a lot of members will say ...'join a club' or 'head up to one of our local observatories' ( such as the one in Bickley www.perthobservatory.wa.gov.au), and I thoroughly recommend that.

Good luck and clear skies!
Bartman
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  #1028  
Old 02-10-2010, 02:06 AM
Chancellor (Jeff)
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Mornin' all
After a few months of lurking on the IIS forums I thought it is time to say a proper hello.
I was introduced to astronomy a few months ago by a friend, and have not turned back. Since looking at the moon through his 8" dob there have been many moments that can only be described as "damn that's pretty".

So far my main interest has been astrophotography, so I guess I have started in the deeper end especially considering never really using a camera before. I actually bought a camera with the main intention of pointing it at the sky causing the guy at camerahouse to look at me a little odd. (Tip: Before going out with a brand new camera, read the manual and learn the camera, especially if it's a new moon and you can't see what you are doing.)
Since then I have purchased an ED100, EQ6Pro and a few of the accessories associated. It's a steep learning curve, but a fun one. Plus, with the images posted on the ISS forums, there is an endless source of inspiration.
Hopefully in the coming months I'll be looking at a nice dob, however until then I'm very happy with what I have and will continue to curse the seemingly endless clouds.
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  #1029  
Old 03-10-2010, 09:30 PM
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Gday, newbie from Brisbane. Gr8 site.
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  #1030  
Old 03-10-2010, 09:34 PM
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Cosmic (Daniel)
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G'day all,

I'm 25 and new to everything related to space and astronomy. I live in Darwin and I am a night-shift worker from time to time. I believe this is where my interest has first stemed from and this is where it will hopefully continue! As a family man im very busy and spare time is getting more and more important to me. I have been told a goto telescope is a good option for viewing multiple points in a short time, so this maybe what im after?? I honestly don't know.

Once I have done and obtained the necessary research on telescopes, ill be purchasing one asap...I just cant wait lol Well my budget is $1000...ish lol it never turns out under budget I do plan to record and connect a laptop to the scope....but is my budget going to allow me to do that. I'm very interest to see how far these retail telescopes reach out there in the great beyond.

My apologizes for all these questions, I know I could of google half of them, as everyone dose these days lol. But hearing it from enthusiasts sounds more like a sensible.

Cheers,

Cos

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  #1031  
Old 06-10-2010, 11:00 PM
BorisM (Boris)
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Hi all, just a quick intro: Joined an Astronomical Society at the beginning of the year (Macarthur Astronomical Society). Bought a Celestron NexStar 6SE with the neximage software. Finally got back into astronomy after a long absence (20 years) you know work, kids etc.....
Astronomy as you know, you learn something every day which is great. I get my kids involved aswell and the added bonus they are enjoying the wonders and distances that can bee seen. Just recently I've tried some planetary photogrophy ad managed to some images of Jupiter (I'll post them on here once I have the opportunity).
Have to recommend the ICEInSpace 2009 compendium Very nice book and very imformative with the equipment used per photos, well done.
Anyway I could go on and on.....lol
Boris
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  #1032  
Old 08-10-2010, 08:37 PM
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sirius0 (Chris)
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Hello Hello it's Chris...

Hi all. Just joined, have had you all pop up a few times when googling and thought it was time I joined.
Be back soon..
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  #1033  
Old 18-10-2010, 08:26 PM
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Kevnool (Kev)
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Gday to Jeff / Litte Bloke / Daniel / Boris and Chris.
Welcome to IIS enjoy your stay here with us.
Ask some questions and tell us some yarns.
Most of all participate.

Clear skies to you all which ever way you want to go as in Astro photography or casually observe the wonders of the night sky.

Cheers Kev.
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  #1034  
Old 18-10-2010, 10:02 PM
Trixie (Carey)
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Hi, I have just joined up after lurking for a while on the beginners forums. I am a total newbie but everyone here seems so nice and polite that I have decided to delurk.

I dont yet have a telescope but am looking to buy one. I have been reading everything I can find on purchasing a telescope and that is how I found this site. I have found so many helpful posts on here and as a result have almost made up my mind to buy an 8 inch Dobsonian but still have about 20 pages of this thread to read through and I still dont quite have my head around eyepieces!

I have always had an interest in space and as my work often had me stuck out in the middle of the desert or the ocean (and much of the time working at night) I enjoyed many nights watching the stars.

Last year I was outside with my then 3 year old looking at the stars and he kept asking me questions about the stars and moon then he spotted Mars and wanted to know what the "orange star" was. I had no idea and had to look it up. Ever since then I have been trying to learn the constellations and now I want to see more!

At the moment I have some ancient old binoculars and, a star chart and a couple of books. So far I have mostly been learning the constellations and havent had much chance to even use my binoculars.

Anyway, I just popped in to say what a great site this is and I have already found answers to most of my newbie questions.

I look forward to spending more time on here!
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  #1035  
Old 18-10-2010, 10:37 PM
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jjjnettie (Jeanette)
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Welcome to IIS Carey. The 8" dob is a great choice. You'll get many years of enjoyment out it. They usually throw in a few eyepieces with the scope to get you started.
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  #1036  
Old 19-10-2010, 08:45 AM
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mental4astro (Alexander)
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Hi Carey,

to IIS!

Binoculars are a fantastic instrument for astronomy! Believe it or not, there are some objects in the sky that are so large that binoculars and not a telescope are the best way to observe the entire object.

In the 'Oberservational and visual astronomy' forum, there is a monthly Challenge. It is not a competition but a resource for new comers to have somewhere to start finding objects, and for old dogs to either reaquaint themselves with old fav's or help with ideas for planning sessions.

I've got a thread running in the 'beginners talk' forum with links to the monthly Challenges, with a little blurb relating to each month's focus objects.

This month's in particular has emphasis on binoculars.

http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/s...ad.php?t=58900

Or you can go directly to the 'observational and visual astronomy' forum and have a look through the various topics raised. It is also a good place to ask questions for tips on looking for particular targets.

Before you purchase a scope though, I'd suggest you go to an astro club or some other 'star party' to have a look at what these scopes both look like and perform like. You might be surprised at just how big an 8" dob can be if you've never seen one before. I realise that it might be tricky with a 3 year old, but they might surprise you with their enthusiasm and excitment. The astro clubs are most welcoming places and you can stay as short or as long as you like. You will find many listed under the "Our Community" heading in the top left margin of the IIS pages. You can also start a thread asking for a local get-together either here in the Beginners forum or even in the Star Parties forum.
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  #1037  
Old 19-10-2010, 09:54 PM
Trixie (Carey)
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Thanks for the link. I havent been to look at that forum yet so will certainly have a go at this months challenge.

Yes going to a Astro club is certainly what I should do but the idea of turning up all by myself is just too scary for me, especially given how little I know about the subject just yet. I have a hard enough time posting on online forums!

I am not in a hurry as I have been enjoying using my binoculars at the moment, so I have plenty of time to read up on it all.
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  #1038  
Old 19-10-2010, 10:08 PM
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mental4astro (Alexander)
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Carey, please don't feel intimidated. Star Parties are informal gatherings, and everyone will be most impressed that you should have a go. And if you take your binos, even more so, and they will be able to point out little treasures to chase down.

Just don't bug the imaging boys and girls, they are rather precious folks,
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  #1039  
Old 19-10-2010, 10:49 PM
buddinseeker (Mike)
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Been a while since my mind turned seriously to getting telescope but recently I have been reading alot recently and the choice doesn't get any easier.

Go cheap and cheerful to see if it turns into flash in the pan and struggle with frustrations of poor equipment, invest in good gear for it to gather dust or regret the purchase when it takes off and find the initial investment lost and need to start save up from new again...

My desire to enjoy the hobby and share it with my young son is the main drive, ultimately I wouldn't mind getting into astrophotgraphy so ultimately I would like the scope to be versitile enough to turn to this much further down the track.

I have spoken to a few suppliers and looks like I am heading the way of a dobsonian with most suggestion it would be a good place to start, am reading through options and upgradability but not ruling out other options yet.

I must admit reading through these beginner threads are very informative keep up the good work ! I got a lot of deciding to do...
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  #1040  
Old 21-10-2010, 01:07 PM
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iceman (Mike)
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Hi buddinseeker.

It's a difficult balance, where you want a telescope that's great for a newbie, great for kids, and yet versatile enough to be able to be used for astrophotography later on.
Astrophotography really is a whole other ball game and can require a much larger investment in gear, and time!

How old is your son?

A dobsonian is certainly a recommended way to go for newbies, and 6-8" or 10" dobs are good for kids too as they're fairly low to the ground and depending on how old the kids are, might be able to get by with a small step ladder or crate.

An 8" dob is really the ideal starting size, because it's big enough to be able to see excellent detail on the planets, moon and see galaxies and nebulas, while still being small enough and cheap enough to be a first telescope and portable.

Stay away from small, cheap refractors because they're really only good for looking at the moon.

As always, if you can, try to get along to an astro society meet neet you (not sure where Wanneroo is!?) and have a look at and through some of the different sized telescopes you'll see there. It'll help you refine your decision process.

Good luck!
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