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Old 02-07-2018, 02:00 PM
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LewisM
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Is true RGB imaging dead?

I note the distinct lack of true RGB imagery these days - every man and his dog is NB. Thankfully (my opinion), some still do do RGB - be it OSC or filtered - but the vast majority have gone NB - presumably because of the rapid and vapid increase in LP. Nevertheless, I still persevere with an OSC CCD and use PI to eliminate the LP and gradients.

So, do you think more imagers will move away from RGB and just do NB? And do you like NB imagery? (personally - and no offence - I am not a fan of pure NB images. RGB/NB combine is fine, just not pure NB). To me, NOT imaging RGB is stepping away from "respecting the light" (purely IMHO, so no hissy fits )
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Old 02-07-2018, 02:19 PM
glend (Glen)
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Even though it is dark enough at my Obs for RGB, I actually prefer NB for the level of detail it brings out in my primary targets - emission nebulae. The most beautiful structures in the Southern Hemisphere can be seen in all their glory in NB.
I also see a trend towards RGB Ha, particularly for those galaxies with Ha emission blooms. M83 is a good example where Ha enhances a good RGB image.

And of course I must add that PI is not required.

As far as "respecting the light" is concerned, narrowband is light as much as RGB is light. The poorly performing human eye does not really capture Ha, but it's still part of the spectrum, and flooding the universe with its glory.
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Old 02-07-2018, 03:12 PM
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Stonius (Markus)
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It's an interesting point, because you could then say RGB is what you'd see through a telescope, only, it's not, is it? We should all just capture luminance in that case :-)

I'm very much not a purist. I just like pretty pictures. I don't even mind diffraction spikes (I'll show myself out).

Markus
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Old 02-07-2018, 03:41 PM
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graham.hobart (Graham stevens)
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RGB imaging

I like both and have to say I agree with you that I have noticed the pervasive LP in the past few years in my Bortle 6 skies. I do appreciate the star colours on my OSC though as I have problems getting nice star colours with my NB.
I shoot both at the same time but at different scales anyway.
And I love diffraction spikes!!
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:13 PM
raymo
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You would see RGB through your scope if it were insanely huge.
raymo
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:41 PM
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Atmos (Colin)
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For me it comes down to where I am. Exclusively narrowband from home, exclusively RGB from Heathcote
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Old 02-07-2018, 07:56 PM
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Slawomir (Suavi)
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I started out my adventure in astro imaging with narrowband purely because of where I used to live.

I like NB imaging because of the intensity of detail and that is provides with some information about processes within the nebulae and gas distribution. IMO NB brings up the hidden beauty of emission nebulae.

I also like RGB images of galaxies and looking at options to get a fast RGB astrograph for chasing fainter and smaller galaxies.

Therefore, IMO, both NB and RGB imaging have their uses and complement each other.
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Old 02-07-2018, 08:24 PM
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h0ughy (David)
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too lazy and not enough time - so OSC
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Old 02-07-2018, 08:50 PM
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RGB is hardly dead....might be resting...or...pining for the fjords.
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Old 02-07-2018, 08:58 PM
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Andy01 (Andy)
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Nb gives me creative freedom to interpret HST type colour palettes.
In turn this allows me to put my own spin on familiar & not so familiar targets.

At risk of being controversial- Where’s the fun in shooting the same thing the same way as 10,000 other people? Limited only by one’s equipment $ value?
Sorry not meaning to offend.

And as mentioned above, there’s just more “stuff” to see in NB.

RGB done well looks right or done badly looks wrong- not much tolerance or creativity there.

And for me it’s mostly academic- I live under LP.
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Old 02-07-2018, 10:11 PM
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I use an Astronomic 2" CLS-CCD filter in front of all other filters.
I have to due to sodium & mercury lamp light pollution.
That effects the colours as well.
It obviously blocking some of the yellow/orange colour.


I find that an Ha filter gives a slightly better FWHM on stars so
it is giving sharper images.
It helps to combine it with the Red channel & even a bit of the Luminance
channel to make a much nicer picture.
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Old 02-07-2018, 11:09 PM
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troypiggo (Troy)
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My RGB filters sit unused in my filter wheel almost as much as my NB ones
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Old 03-07-2018, 08:11 AM
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multiweb (Marc)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by troypiggo View Post
My RGB filters sit unused in my filter wheel almost as much as my NB ones
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Old 03-07-2018, 10:59 AM
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If you wish to image galaxies or anything dusty ie reflection nebulae and image them in colour....you will certainly need RGB filters, as both are essentially invisible in NB filters. Star clusters, both open and globular, also look a lot better in RGB too . If however you are happy to be restricted to imaging emission nebulae only, then yes, you can do this with narrowband emission line filters alone.

Mike
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Old 03-07-2018, 12:08 PM
glend (Glen)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by strongmanmike View Post
If you wish to image galaxies or anything dusty ie reflection nebulae and image them in colour....you will certainly need RGB filters, as both are essentially invisible in NB filters. Star clusters, both open and globular, also look a lot better in RGB too . If however you are happy to be restricted to imaging emission nebulae only, then yes, you can do this with narrowband emission line filters alone.

Mike
It should be pointed out that some galaxies have very strong emissions, the Hamburger being one, and are certainly not invisible in NB. There are no absolutes in regard to imaging. NB accents are easily captured in M83 and enhance the appearance imho. The Helix Nebula looks great in both RGB and NB.
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Old 03-07-2018, 12:24 PM
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ZeroID (Brent)
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RGB +Ha at present, still learning the art. I can manage the LP better after my earlier OSC efforts with a DSLR. I'll play with OII and SIII ( when I can afford the SIII) later. Mainly just as an option, something else to try and see what else is up there to see. RGB is not dead, it is another step on the path.
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Old 03-07-2018, 12:33 PM
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LewisM
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I like RGB/NB combos...I am NOT a fan though of pure NB. Loses all the splendour IMO (and mine alone ) and just becomes a Hockney colour drama. (wonder if Hockney ever invigilated imaging contests? )

Horses for courses.

I live and image under EXTREME LP - try living next to a domestic/international/air force airport, with 24/7 lighting, PLUS a major shopping centre/Bunnings a kilometer away...a 2 sec exposure at night with a DSLR is RED. Yet, I still plug away and let PI take away my LP woes (no filters). Not saying my images are good, just saying that RGB (OSC in my case) can and is entirely possible. Just get to know your software (took me - no joke - 5 years to come to terms with PI )

I like looking at and imaging what the - EXTENDED - eye can/could see. That is my ideal. NB is not my flavour, yet also recognise that it too respects the light (just not what the eye can typically see)
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Old 03-07-2018, 12:53 PM
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strongmanmike (Michael)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glend View Post
It should be pointed out that some galaxies have very strong emissions, the Hamburger being one, and are certainly not invisible in NB. There are no absolutes in regard to imaging. NB accents are easily captured in M83 and enhance the appearance imho. The Helix Nebula looks great in both RGB and NB.
Of course, you are quite right Glen, Ha and even OIII emission in some cases, can certainly be recorded in many galaxies but this will be used to enhance an RGB or LRGB shot. There are not too many good looking galaxy images compiled from narrowband data alone ...In other words, you really do need RGB filters (and/or L) to get a good shot of galaxies, produce natural colour star cluster images or have any hope of recording reflection nebula

Mike
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Old 03-07-2018, 02:42 PM
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SimmoW (SIMON)
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Population increase and the increased popularity of imaging has skewed many of us to go NB. Geeky blokes with disposable income and a love for accessories like Astrodons!

Its just logical, essential and yes it has a massive allowance for interpretation and i love adding nb to my pristine rgb. When i can get things to work!

I have the luxury of choice, able to get nice rgb and loving to combine it with nb. A deliberate decision, a true investment and commitment to my hobby/love.

Ive seen stunning rgb from many folks here, it will always have a place and i suppose might become more precious over time. I admire folks who slowly gather their precious RGB over months or even years
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Old 03-07-2018, 05:22 PM
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Paul Haese
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LewisM View Post
I note the distinct lack of true RGB imagery these days - every man and his dog is NB. Thankfully (my opinion), some still do do RGB - be it OSC or filtered - but the vast majority have gone NB - presumably because of the rapid and vapid increase in LP. Nevertheless, I still persevere with an OSC CCD and use PI to eliminate the LP and gradients.

So, do you think more imagers will move away from RGB and just do NB? And do you like NB imagery? (personally - and no offence - I am not a fan of pure NB images. RGB/NB combine is fine, just not pure NB). To me, NOT imaging RGB is stepping away from "respecting the light" (purely IMHO, so no hissy fits )

Hmm respecting the light. I seem to have heard that before somewhere. It keeps coming back to bite me on the butt. See 2011 Malin M42 entry in which David spoke about respecting the light and visibly gesticulating toward my image.

Well it you think about it Lewis, NB is all part of the spectrum of light, even radio is part of the spectrum of radiation which RGB light is seen within. So what is respecting the light or what is True RGB imaging? Aren't we just capturing the part of the spectrum, should we only stick to one part of the spectrum? So long as you respect that part of the spectrum should that not be the criteria?
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