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Old 04-09-2019, 09:18 PM
willilamwgn (William)
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India's Vikram Lander is now orbiting the moon

The Vikram Lander successfully separated from Chandrayaan2 Orbiter on September 2, 2019. It is expected to touch down on the lunar surface on September 7, then the Pragyan rover would get down on the moon surface.

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com...w/70945529.cms
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Old 07-09-2019, 06:19 PM
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Originally Posted by willilamwgn View Post
The Vikram Lander successfully separated from Chandrayaan2 Orbiter on September 2, 2019. It is expected to touch down on the lunar surface on September 7, then the Pragyan rover would get down on the moon surface.

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com...w/70945529.cms



How sad that it failed.
That is a terrible setback for India.
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Old 09-09-2019, 11:25 AM
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They found the Vikram with the orbiter's help on the surface. Now they are attempting communication with it - don't give up hope yet!
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Old 09-09-2019, 06:21 PM
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They found the Vikram with the orbiter's help on the surface. Now they are attempting communication with it - don't give up hope yet!



But I can't find the thermal image they claim to have of the lander.
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Old 09-09-2019, 07:21 PM
Hans Tucker (Hans)
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How sad that it failed.
That is a terrible setback for India.
India now one with the British.
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Old 11-09-2019, 09:29 PM
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India now one with the British.



Yes - failed just like the POMs.


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Some Updates - ISRO says that have taken an image, using the high resolution camera on the orbiter, (note that this not a thermal image as some reports suggest, the thermal camera has much too low resolution). Given the size of the lander and the resolution of the camera this will be less than 10 pixels across, making claims that it's merely sitting at a bad angle dubious at best. They have not shared this image so there's no way to know how accurate their claims are. The only reliable velocity data for the impact comes from the doppler trace, and this showed no significant deceleration therefore the lander crashed at 200-400km/h. This is what they mean when they say 'hard landing'. Given the high lateral velocity it likely bounced and rolled across the surface before coming to a stop. The transmitter cut off at impact, it's likely that everything else broke at the same time and communications will not be esablished.
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