Go Back   IceInSpace > Beginners Start Here > Beginners Equipment Discussions

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1  
Old 15-12-2019, 05:54 PM
Alandanny's Avatar
Alandanny (Alan Danny)
Registered User

Alandanny is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 2
Please advice to buy an astrophotography camera

Hi all,

I have a project to upgrade my refracting telescope to capture Jupiter and Mars images. After many days of repairing and upgrading, the glasses are almost finished, so I want to ask people to buy a good camera.

Through learning about photography techniques on the forum, I found that they have suggested some criteria for cameras for astrophotography:

1. Easily customize elements: ISO, speed, aperture, set time, exposure (bulb)
2- Remove the lens
3- Light
4- Sensor (sensor) to
5- Live view, LCD sharp
6- High ISO, fast focus, anti-shake ...

The guide also suggests that some models that integrate the above criteria are mirrorless models, with models such as Sony Nex, Olympus EP, Nikon V1, Panasonic ...

It is miserable that my knowledge of cameras and photography is so shallow that I should ask for advice, in particular:

With a budget limit of buying about $ 600, a set of refracting telescopes d70f900 (homemade <3), geodetic pins, EQ1 bulbs (without a motor), which camera should I buy to fulfill my desire to shoot Jupiter, Saturn, Mars? Is there any simple guide for beginners like me about astrophotography?
Hope everybody help please! Thanks very much!
Best regards,
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 16-12-2019, 12:37 AM
Outcast's Avatar
Outcast (Carlton)
Always gonna be a NOOB...

Outcast is online now
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Cairns, Qld
Posts: 1,057
Alan,

This is a really good question but, we probably need more information in order to answer it properly...

Do you only want to do planetary & lunar imaging or, do you want to do deep sky as well?

I see that you don't have a tracking mount so, that kinda rules out deep sky stuff but, within reason you will be able to do some planetary & lunar imaging...

In general, video is the best format for planetary & lunar imaging then you process the video into stacked frames & then sharpen for a nice tight image. This is still possible on a non tracking mount; it's a lot trickier but, it is still able to be done...

Tell us some more about what you want to do & then we will see if we can steer you in the right direction..

Cheers
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 16-12-2019, 07:07 AM
Startrek (Martin)
Registered User

Startrek is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Sydney
Posts: 2,619
Alan
I started with a Canon T3i or 600D nearly 4 years ago and still use it
It does a great job imaging planets and the moon
You should be able to pick one ( body only) up for under $600 and all you need is a T ring and adapter so it can be inserted into your focuser ( you do need a 2” focuser in your telescope )
Later when you have more experience, you can upgrade to a tracking Goto mount like a HEQ5 and use BYEOS software to capture your images with the same camera Canon T3i or 600D via a laptop near the mount ( BYEOS was developed by fellow Canadian Guylain Roche )
Recommend you watch YouTube videos of Trevor Jones from Astrobackyard ( another fellow Canadian ) who demonstrates how to use a DSLR for astrophotography
Cheers
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 16-12-2019, 07:27 AM
ChrisV's Avatar
ChrisV (Chris)
Registered User

ChrisV is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Sydney
Posts: 1,466
Take this all with a grain of salt as I'm a planetary failure.

Sounds like you might want one of those small sensor fast usb3 cameras - I don't know which would be best.

I'd be concerned that you
- don't have a motorised go-to mount. That might make it difficult.
- Also you'll want a longer focal length than 900mm - a x2 or more Barlow or powermate? But I suppose it all depends on how good the optics are on your custom scope?
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 16-12-2019, 08:51 AM
Nikolas's Avatar
Nikolas (Nik)
Dazed and confused

Nikolas is offline
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 1,762
zwo 224mc or 290 mc would work for planetary quite well as they both have very fast shutter rates
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 16-12-2019, 10:08 AM
Outcast's Avatar
Outcast (Carlton)
Always gonna be a NOOB...

Outcast is online now
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Cairns, Qld
Posts: 1,057
Quote:
Originally Posted by Startrek View Post
Alan
I started with a Canon T3i or 600D nearly 4 years ago and still use it
It does a great job imaging planets and the moon
You should be able to pick one ( body only) up for under $600 and all you need is a T ring and adapter so it can be inserted into your focuser ( you do need a 2” focuser in your telescope )
Later when you have more experience, you can upgrade to a tracking Goto mount like a HEQ5 and use BYEOS software to capture your images with the same camera Canon T3i or 600D via a laptop near the mount ( BYEOS was developed by fellow Canadian Guylain Roche )
Recommend you watch YouTube videos of Trevor Jones from Astrobackyard ( another fellow Canadian ) who demonstrates how to use a DSLR for astrophotography
Cheers
This is great advice for future proofing & giving yourself options later on down the track

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisV View Post
Take this all with a grain of salt as I'm a planetary failure.

Sounds like you might want one of those small sensor fast usb3 cameras - I don't know which would be best.

I'd be concerned that you
- don't have a motorised go-to mount. That might make it difficult.
- Also you'll want a longer focal length than 900mm - a x2 or more Barlow or powermate? But I suppose it all depends on how good the optics are on your custom scope?
I'd find it hard to disagree with this comment too

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikolas View Post
zwo 224mc or 290 mc would work for planetary quite well as they both have very fast shutter rates
For what it is worth, I use a 224mc for planetary work & a DSLR for Deep Sky stuff so, good advice here too...

All of the above is good advice Alan, just depends what exactly you want to achieve in the end... & how deep your pockets might be in the future...

Whilst taken on tracking mounts, through totally different scope to yours, I've added what I think are two pretty reasonable examples of what you might achieve... note, they are captured using video, stacked in Autostakkert & sharpened in Registax.. they are not, single shot exposures.

I'm sure others could provide considerably better examples...
Attached Thumbnails
Click for full-size image (Jupiter IR Cut after Wavelets.jpg)
25.4 KB36 views
Click for full-size image (Lunar Surface Annotated Low Res.jpg)
163.9 KB32 views
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 16-12-2019, 11:35 AM
Startrek (Martin)
Registered User

Startrek is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Sydney
Posts: 2,619
Alan,
My apologies, Backyard EOS was developed by Guylain Rochon ( not Roche ) and BYEOS is availability through O’Telescope in Ontario ( If you prefer Nikon cameras they also have Backyard Nikon as well )
Trevor Jones has also a great site with plenty of information and tutorials. Trevor hails from St Catharines and is a member of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada ( Niagara)
Trevor also recommends Ontario Telescopes and Accessories for all your astronomy needs
You may already have the above information but I thought I would suggest these astronomers and suppliers as the are in your region of Toronto
Cheers
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +10. The time is now 08:31 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Version 3.8.7 | Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Advertisement
Bintel
Advertisement
Limpet Controller
Advertisement
NexDome Observatories
Advertisement
Testar
Advertisement
Astronomy and Electronics Centre
Advertisement