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  #1  
Old 28-07-2018, 11:25 AM
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Weekend Aust. Mag. Story on Prolific Supernova Hunter Rev. Bob Evans

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/lif...5c90d36254429e - You will Enjoy this Story But it has a sad Ending- Tony
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Old 28-07-2018, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anthony.tony View Post
https://www.theaustralian.com.au/lif...5c90d36254429e - You will Enjoy this Story But it has a sad Ending- Tony
You have to subscribe and pay before you can watch it.
Cheers
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Old 28-07-2018, 01:08 PM
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I went in first time got the Story -Then posted it- The went back again - it locked me out You have too pay - Go to your newsagent buy the Weekend Australian its in The Magazine inside the Paper.
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Old 28-07-2018, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by anthony.tony View Post
I went in first time got the Story -Then posted it- The went back again - it locked me out You have too pay - Go to your newsagent buy the Weekend Australian its in The Magazine inside the Paper.
Thanks
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Old 28-07-2018, 01:53 PM
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In 2004 Bob Evans Gave a talk at our Parkes Astrofest - Tony.
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Old 28-07-2018, 07:47 PM
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Robert was the 2nd guest speaker at the Queensland AstroFest in 1994.
I have a signed "AAVSO SUPERNOVA SEARCH MANUAL" compiled and written by Robert O Evans Chair AAVSO Supernova Search Committee.
Bob is the holder of the record for the most Visual Supernova Discoveries.
As a visual Supernova searcher myself for many years,using 8 and 16" telescopes I can really appreciate how much dedication and skill it required to find so many Supernovae.
CCD imaging has now superseded visual searching,but I still go out sometimes and reel off fifty galaxies in a long nights search.
Robert would do that number in a couple to a few hours, and without the aids I have.
Memory was his major tool.
Cheers
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Old 31-07-2018, 01:56 PM
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That was a really good article!

Bob would often come to Linden Observatory and roll out his 16inch on our observing nights. Through that scope alone he has made about 18 supernova discoveries.
It was amazing how he could hop through a couple of hundred galaxies in just 2 hours.

Regards, Rob
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Old 04-08-2018, 08:55 AM
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From 1981 to 1997, one man would dominate the world of amateur supernova
discovery: the Rev.Robert Evans of New South Wales. By April 1997, Evans had discovered
an incredible 38 supernovae visually using mainly a 25-cm Newtonian (a
larger, more cumbersome, 40-cm Newtonian was also employed at times for the
later discoveries). A few other amateur astronomers did succeed in those 16 years
(Okazaki, Horiguchi, Kushida, Johnson, and Aoki, for example), but it was only
when U.S. amateur Michael Schwartz used an early robotic Paramount mounting
mated to a Celestron 14, in 1997, that Evansí rate of discovery was under threat - From a springer Book - AM Super Nova Hunting In The 21 Century - A Tribute To Bob Evans.
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:06 AM
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From 1981 to 1997, one man would dominate the world of amateur supernova
discovery: the Rev.Robert Evans of New South Wales. By April 1997, Evans had discovered
an incredible 38 supernovae visually using mainly a 25-cm Newtonian (a
larger, more cumbersome, 40-cm Newtonian was also employed at times for the
later discoveries). A few other amateur astronomers did succeed in those 16 years
(Okazaki, Horiguchi, Kushida, Johnson, and Aoki, for example), but it was only
when U.S. amateur Michael Schwartz used an early robotic Paramount mounting
mated to a Celestron 14, in 1997, that Evansí rate of discovery was under threat- Springer Book Excert - Tribute to Bob.
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