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  #21  
Old 23-07-2018, 01:57 AM
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Phil, this is a clean install, was getting them before the re-install.
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  #22  
Old 23-07-2018, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Exfso View Post
Andy it is a Gigabyte Z77MX-D3H.
Thanks Peter. I suspected it may be something of that vintage. I had 20+ of an Intel brand equivalent to this M/B until recently. I'd sling you one if I had any left. Sorry about the delay, I just got back to the office to check the "stock". All gone though
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  #23  
Old 23-07-2018, 10:44 PM
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Thanks Andy, appreciate the thought.
Don't suppose you would know of any other mobo that would fit the bill and take my ram, cpu etc..clutching at straws here.

Last edited by Exfso; 23-07-2018 at 11:07 PM.
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  #24  
Old 23-07-2018, 11:26 PM
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Hi Peter,

It's not hard to find something that fits the bill. Here's an initial idea:
https://www.ebay.com.au/sch/i.html?_...acat=0&_sop=15

All that essentially matters is that the CPU fits. The memory controller is on the CPU (which you're keeping), making them a matched pair. You can find the broader list of options by seeing what's in common with that CPU socket:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LGA_1155
(Alternative Chipsets are listed in the different Intel Chipsets in the 1st and 2nd tables). One simply needs to find a product wrapped around said chipset. As they are all old/monetarily worthless, simply aim for Q/H/Z77.

The limits of the first table may be an issue, which is easily clarified by stating which CPU you actually have - apologies if you did, my eyes are a little blurry this late

I'll have another look at work. $130 is too much to pay for this old junk. No offence meant - my fave home PC is exactly the same age...

Last edited by AndyG; 23-07-2018 at 11:44 PM.
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  #25  
Old 25-07-2018, 09:01 PM
dpastern (Dave Pastern)
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Try this for me - uninstall the AV software, reboot and re-test for a few weeks. I've seen AV do some very funny things over the years.

If you can, unplug the PC from mains AC, pop the sides of the case off and check the caps (capacitors) to see if they're bulging into a dome like structure on their top.

Cheap PSUs can do all sorts of weird things too, I *never* recommend going cheap when it comes to PSUs.

Another thought - reboot into safe mode and keep it like that for several weeks and see if it BSODs. if it doesn't, then it's almost certainly a driver or software related issue.

Curious to see what the outcome of this problem is.
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  #26  
Old 25-07-2018, 09:16 PM
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Dave, have done the uninstall of Eset, also have a pretty good power supply Thermaltake. Also looked at all the caps on the mobo, they look to be in good condition, no bulging/leaking etc. (I am a wire jerker by trade so have a pretty good idea what to look for)
The really strange thing is it was doing the BSOD before the OS was re-installed, so I doubt it is software. All the drivers are up to date. I disconnected all the external drives just to make sure it was not one of these.
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  #27  
Old 25-07-2018, 11:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Exfso View Post
Dave, have done the uninstall of Eset, also have a pretty good power supply Thermaltake. Also looked at all the caps on the mobo, they look to be in good condition, no bulging/leaking etc. (I am a wire jerker by trade so have a pretty good idea what to look for)
The really strange thing is it was doing the BSOD before the OS was re-installed, so I doubt it is software. All the drivers are up to date. I disconnected all the external drives just to make sure it was not one of these.
Thermaltake PSUs are quality, and uninstall of ESET should eliminate it from the equation. If Caps look good, then I'd say that they're good.

How many RAM slots are being used? If possible, keep it simple and just use One RAM slot/stick and see what happens.

When you did the wipe, did you just do a basic wipe of the HDD? If possible, use a bootable tool (USB stick) to do a low level format of the HDD, including the MBR, running the tool 3 or 4 times on a detailed low level format. Then reinstall Windows, and Windows ONLY and monitor for 2-3 weeks (keep it off the network/Internet during testing is my advice). I tend to not only format the drive, but run a fdisk on the /mbr.

My mate had issues with an older SSD a few years back, with BSODs and it was down to a firmware issue with said drive. It had to be sent back to base/manufacturer. I can't remember the brand.

Also, another suggestion, is to wipe (as per above paragraph to be thorough) and install GNU/Linux (my suggestion is Debian, but Ubuntu will suffice I guess). GNU/Linux is both very stable, and works well with hardware at a hardware layer, much better than MS Windows imho (sorry, but Windows is a terrible O/S) . GNU/Linux will also have many tools to help diagnose issues, including excellent logging. Yes, MS Windows logs stuff, but it's logs are truly HORRID. Having managed Linux and Windows mail/web/SQL servers for near 8 years in my last job, I know which operating system was more robust and nicer to use. Horses for courses though i guess - Linux is not everyones cuppa tea!
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  #28  
Old 26-07-2018, 05:32 PM
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I have 4 Ram sticks and my mate, a computer tech who has been building computers for years as his business, did the re install, so I would suggest he knows his stuff based on the amount of customers he has. My SSD is a Samsung, must admit, I am leaning toward this possibly being the culprit. I have another SSD with the operating system on it which was done via this computer a few months ago, so I will connect that one to the computer and see what happens. The BSOD reboots within 10 secs now where-as before it took about 20 mins to do the crash dump.
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  #29  
Old 26-07-2018, 08:31 PM
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I have seen memtest fail on detecting faulty memory in the past (admittedly, it's rare for memtest to be wrong from my experiences). Any hardware troubleshooting process with PCs is to keep it simple - i.e. the process of elimination.

I've seen people fail to spot things in the industry (20 years building my own PCs, 15 years working in IT) - for example, my last job, we had an older server that wouldn't boot. 2 other guys looked at it, and the boss, and gave up. I had a look at it and noticed popping caps on a daughterboard. Did some research, it was a known issue with this Dell server board, found a 2nd hand replacement for said daughterboard, told the boss, he went ahead and bought the 2nd hand part on my advice, we got it, swapped it out, and voila - Dell server started working again.

3 other people missed this. All of them pretty experienced and knowledgeable.

Always keep it simple. Linux is far better with hardware than any form of Windows, definitely worth testing the rig with that imho.
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  #30  
Old 26-07-2018, 09:33 PM
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If you want to use linux to test stability just download a bootable DVD or USB stick. It won't be very fast as it is running from a DVD or USB stick but there is no need to wipe your drive and install it.
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  #31  
Old 26-07-2018, 09:38 PM
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If you want to use linux to test stability just download a bootable DVD or USB stick. It won't be very fast as it is running from a DVD or USB stick but there is no need to wipe your drive and install it.
and if it's a SSD issue? Running Linux from a bootable DVD/USB stick is a hack solution. If you're gonna do it, do it properly. Since the machine is rather problematic, I doubt the OP has any data on it to worry about, so installing shouldn't be an issue other than time taken to do so. Most modern Linux installations are easier and quicker than Windows too...and detect all of your hardware OOTB, unlike Microsoft Windows.
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  #32  
Old 27-07-2018, 06:09 PM
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Originally Posted by dpastern View Post
and if it's a SSD issue? Running Linux from a bootable DVD/USB stick is a hack solution. If you're gonna do it, do it properly. Since the machine is rather problematic, I doubt the OP has any data on it to worry about, so installing shouldn't be an issue other than time taken to do so. Most modern Linux installations are easier and quicker than Windows too...and detect all of your hardware OOTB, unlike Microsoft Windows.
Why is it a hack solution? It will be slightly slower at worst and as you said it will detect hardware automatically. If it is an SSD issue then there will be no crashes as it won't be used. If it is issue with other hardware then there will be crashes.
Keep in mind that Windows was running nicely until recently and that a clean reinstall did not help.

And in this case it is not just the extra time of reinstalling Linux and then Windows again, Peter said that he had to ask his mate to do a install Windows for him.

Peter, if you do the test with your other SSD make sure you disable Windows updates. That may be another possible culprit.
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  #33  
Old 27-07-2018, 06:18 PM
dpastern (Dave Pastern)
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Originally Posted by luka View Post
Why is it a hack solution? It will be slightly slower at worst and as you said it will detect hardware automatically. If it is an SSD issue then there will be no crashes as it won't be used. If it is issue with other hardware then there will be crashes.
Keep in mind that Windows was running nicely until recently and that a clean reinstall did not help.

And in this case it is not just the extra time of reinstalling Linux and then Windows again, Peter said that he had to ask his mate to do a install Windows for him.

Peter, if you do the test with your other SSD make sure you disable Windows updates. That may be another possible culprit.
Installing on said SSD vs running a live disk is why it's a hack. Actually installing on the SSD and running the O/S from said SSD will stress the SSD from an I/O perspective.

Another thing with a live disk setup is that no log files will be written to disk, which will make checking problems more problematic.

I have a good number of years in the industry, and also troubleshooting problems for friends/family.
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  #34  
Old 30-07-2018, 01:02 PM
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I removed the old SSD and replaced with the new Samsung with Windows 7 Pro on it, so far so good, all working, I suppose now I have posted this bloody Murphy will intervene.
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  #35  
Old 30-07-2018, 01:23 PM
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two things:

SSD: we had a similar problem at work.
uninstalling and re-installing the Samsung Magician software resolved the problem.
we did not even need the latest version


BSOD reboots:
you can disable the automatic reboot of windows after a BSOD, which helps immensely

here's a link to instructions
https://www.lifewire.com/how-do-i-di...indows-2626067
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  #36  
Old 30-07-2018, 04:53 PM
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Thanks for that, appreciated.
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  #37  
Old 30-07-2018, 07:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJDD View Post
two things:

SSD: we had a similar problem at work.
uninstalling and re-installing the Samsung Magician software resolved the problem.
we did not even need the latest version


BSOD reboots:
you can disable the automatic reboot of windows after a BSOD, which helps immensely

here's a link to instructions
https://www.lifewire.com/how-do-i-di...indows-2626067
Ah, that's pretty cool, I didn't know that. That said, I don't use Windows @ home and in the work environment, reboots are a bad thing lol. another win for GNU/Linux - I can update without a reboot, including drivers. Windows, nope...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Exfso View Post
I removed the old SSD and replaced with the new Samsung with Windows 7 Pro on it, so far so good, all working, I suppose now I have posted this bloody Murphy will intervene.
well that sounds encouraging, fingers crossed!
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  #38  
Old 30-07-2018, 08:05 PM
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Dave, I have everything crossed
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  #39  
Old 30-07-2018, 09:07 PM
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Dave, I have everything crossed
as do I! There's nothing more frustrating than an intermittent issue that's non-sensical in its nature! When you get a fix to one of those types of situations, it's a case for a huge party and dance imho!
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  #40  
Old 30-07-2018, 09:36 PM
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The Samsung 850EVO which is the dodgy one has a 5 yr warranty and I purchased it 3 years ago. So if it is in fact faulty I will get a replacement. I rang Samsung Australia today and they will obviously want it back to be tested, all at their cost.
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