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Old 13-09-2019, 03:39 AM
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billdan (Bill)
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Another Interstellar Visitor - Comet C/2019 Q4

A new 20Km wide comet has been seen that is 3 AU from the Sun and it appears to have come from a different star system.
Known as Comet C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) - has a hyperbolic orbit eccentricity of 3.2, based on current observation.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49676757
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Old 13-09-2019, 01:11 PM
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This is exciting. I don't imagine we could launch anything to gather some dust...dust possibly from another solar system.
Alex
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Old 13-09-2019, 02:31 PM
Sunfish (Ray)
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Thanks for that. All over the news also and so people seem interested.

I am sure a lot of astronomers will have their spectrographic analysis underway and we might hear what the tail is made up of.

Perhaps some our own members could tell us.

Quote:
Originally Posted by billdan View Post
A new 20Km wide comet has been seen that is 3 AU from the Sun and it appears to have come from a different star system.
Known as Comet C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) - has a hyperbolic orbit eccentricity of 3.2, based on current observation.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-49676757
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Old 13-09-2019, 02:39 PM
Sunfish (Ray)
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Look at Grennady Borisov and the 0.65m scope he built. What sort of instrument is that, SCT, Maksutov?

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astr...eaded-our-way/
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Old 13-09-2019, 03:11 PM
Sunfish (Ray)
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https://rastreadoresdecometas.wordpr...AR25AIu_AGR8NQ
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Old 14-09-2019, 02:01 PM
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Its travelling incredibly quickly if you consider the average speed of stars relative to the Sun in the solar neighborhood is 20 km/s.

Its on a rapid (41km/s+) , highly eccentric, hyperbolic orbit from another Star system..
So indeed... Another visitor!
Bigjoe
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Old 14-09-2019, 05:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfish View Post
Look at Grennady Borisov and the 0.65m scope he built. What sort of instrument is that, SCT, Maksutov?

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/astr...eaded-our-way/
It looks like a F2 hyperstar setup, there is no room to have a camera and focuser behind the mirror on that fork mount.

Appears us Sth Hemisphere folk are going to get the best chance of seeing it around the 10th Dec at its closest approach to the sun. Its DEC will be -20į near the constellation Sextans.
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Old 15-09-2019, 06:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billdan View Post
It looks like a F2 hyperstar setup, there is no room to have a camera and focuser behind the mirror on that fork mount.
Custom built f1.5 scope with aperture 650mm.
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Old 15-09-2019, 11:02 AM
Sunfish (Ray)
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Thanks for the answers people and that photo of the scope mounted. Could not find that?

Now that is a project for those Byers worm drives. A hyper hyper star. Is the mirror spherical or some more complex shape I wonder.
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Old 15-09-2019, 12:17 PM
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Photos are from a video interview on youtube.

It's a Hamiltonian catadioptric. It's been built by the author including the fork mount.
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Old 27-09-2019, 06:27 PM
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Get ready for more interstellar objects - Yale astronomers

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Shelton, Yale University
Gregory Laughlin and Malena Rice weren't exactly surprised a few weeks ago when they learned that a second interstellar object had made its way into our solar system.

The Yale University astronomers had just put the finishing touches on a new study suggesting that these strange, icy visitors from other planets are going to keep right on coming. We can expect a few large objects showing up every year, they say; smaller objects entering the solar system could reach into the hundreds each year.

The study has been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal Letters.
Story here :-
https://phys.org/news/2019-09-ready-...tronomers.html

Paper here :-
https://arxiv.org/pdf/1909.06387.pdf
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Old 27-09-2019, 07:15 PM
Sunfish (Ray)
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Interesting stuff Gary.
An interstellar hail storm.
All our planets are more than pretty pictures.

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Old 28-09-2019, 11:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Professor Alan Fitzsimmons, Queen's University Belfast
New frontier for science as astronomers detect gas molecules in comet from another star

An international team of astronomers, including Queen’s University Belfast researchers, have made a historic discovery, detecting gas molecules in a comet which has tumbled into our solar system from another star.

It is the first time that astronomers have been able to detect this type of material in an interstellar object.

The discovery marks an important step forward for science as it will now allow scientists to begin deciphering exactly what these objects are made of and how our home solar system compares with others in our galaxy.

“For the first time we are able to accurately measure what an interstellar visitor is made of, and compare it with our own Solar system” said Professor Alan Fitzsimmons of the Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen’s University Belfast.

Comet Borisov was discovered by Crimean amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov in August. Observations over the following 12 days showed that it was not orbiting the Sun, but was just passing through the Solar system on its own path around our galaxy.

By 24 September it had been renamed 2I/Borisov, the second interstellar object ever discovered by astronomers. Unlike the first such object discovered two years ago, 1I/'Oumuamua, this object appeared as a faint comet, with a surrounding atmosphere of dust particles, and a short tail.

Alan Fitzsimmons and colleagues from Europe, the United States and Chile used the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma in the Canary Islands to detect the gas in the comet. But doing so was tricky.

He said: “Our first attempt was on Friday 13 September, but we were unlucky and were thwarted by the brightness of the sky so close to the Sun. But the next attempt was successful.”
Full Press Release :-
https://www.qub.ac.uk/News/Allnews/N...otherstar.html

The research has been submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Letters for scientific peer review, and is available at https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.12144
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Old 30-09-2019, 08:13 PM
Sunfish (Ray)
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Very interesting thanks Gary. That analysis was quick off the mark.

Same material but from another system.

So we donít have to go up there to find out although it seems like that might also be a possibility.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gary View Post
Full Press Release :-
https://www.qub.ac.uk/News/Allnews/N...otherstar.html

The research has been submitted to the Astrophysical Journal Letters for scientific peer review, and is available at https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.12144
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